[SOLVED] Is it worth the time for a tech learning Robocopy?

Rodion15

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Before I continue potentially wasting my time learning how to use Robocopy, I would like to get some opinions. Is there a universal tool that does everything Robocopy and Macrium Reflect can do?

For a computer tech, such as a repair and networking technician, does Robocopy do anything, when compared with other tools like Macrium Reflect, that makes it worth learning? (besides being free…but it maybe irrational spending x hours learning when you can get a few bucks).
 
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USAFRet

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You left me intrigued...what do you mean Powershell? I see powershell as a better Command Prompt. How would Powershell improve my backups?
..I'm happy when I learn what to learn, I'm just learning based on instinct, I'd really like to have some list of "Best stuff a tech should learn without fail". Thank you guys.
Yes, powershell is CMD on steroids.
BUT....you can do a LOT with it. Basically, it is its own scripting language.

If all you're concerned about is "backups", then neither robocopy nor PS are the tools to use.
But as a "computer tech", you need to know much more than just had to instantiate a backup process.
 

punkncat

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Robocopy has it's uses, particularly in archive or mirroring case use. IMO for a system that you may or may not have working, probably don't know certain aspects about the build and it's network infrastructure and "naming", I probably would not bother in lieu of a good cloning program and a dock.
 

USAFRet

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Before I continue potentially wasting my time learning how to use Robocopy, I would like to get some opinions.

For a computer tech, such as a repair and networking technician, does Robocopy do anything, when compared with other tools like Macrium Reflect, that makes it worth learning? (besides being free…but it maybe irrational spending X hours learning when you can get a few bucks).
Why not?
Its a tool, like any other.

It has its uses, Macrium has its uses, powershell has its uses....
 

punkncat

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As an aside, Robocopy isn't hard to use it's just "fiddly" in regard to locations and specific desire for the copy (as it were). There are couple of really good console style tools that work with Robocopy to make it plug in some info and hit the go switch.
 
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Rodion15

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Why not?
Its a tool, like any other.

It has its uses, Macrium has its uses, powershell has its uses....
I'm planning to test Macrium Reflect, I heard it's very good. I posted this thinking that there may be some "universal tool", whether it's Macrium or whichever, that does everything and would make all other tools unnecessary. I'm liking Robocopy to be honest, and it's forced me to learn some stuff I new little about, like hard links, symlinks, etc, but I don't like wasting precious time.

Thanks for your answer.
 

Rodion15

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As an aside, Robocopy isn't hard to use it's just "fiddly" in regard to locations and specific desire for the copy (as it were). There are couple of really good console style tools that work with Robocopy to make it plug in some info and hit the go switch.
would those tools work from a Windows RE Command Line? like booting from a Windows 10 installer?, that would be nice. Could you please name any of those?

Thank you
 
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USAFRet

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would those tools from a Windows RE Command Line? like booting from a Windows 10 installer?, that would be nice. Could you please name any of those?

Thank you

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/whats-new-in-windows-7-robocopy
 
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punkncat

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would those tools from a Windows RE Command Line? like booting from a Windows 10 installer?, that would be nice. Could you please name any of those?

Thank you
I haven't used it in some years, and it appears that someone over at Microsoft wrote a GUI for it since.
The one I used was called RoboCop where I plugged in the parameters and it gave me 'code' that I further made into a task to automate my backups. I have since gone to another method for this.
 
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Rodion15

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Rodion15

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No disagreement with preceding posts.

I will simply suggest that learning Powershell is likely to be a better "investment" in the long run.
You left me intrigued...what do you mean Powershell? I see powershell as a better Command Prompt. How would Powershell improve my backups?
..I'm happy when I learn what to learn, I'm just learning based on instinct, I'd really like to have some list of "Best stuff a tech should learn without fail". Thank you guys.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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You left me intrigued...what do you mean Powershell? I see powershell as a better Command Prompt. How would Powershell improve my backups?
..I'm happy when I learn what to learn, I'm just learning based on instinct, I'd really like to have some list of "Best stuff a tech should learn without fail". Thank you guys.
Yes, powershell is CMD on steroids.
BUT....you can do a LOT with it. Basically, it is its own scripting language.

If all you're concerned about is "backups", then neither robocopy nor PS are the tools to use.
But as a "computer tech", you need to know much more than just had to instantiate a backup process.
 

Ralston18

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Will second @USAFRet

For example, open Powershell as Admin

Run (cmdlet)

Get-ComputerInfo

or

Get-Netadapter

or

Get-Disk


= = = =

Powershell has quite a number of "Get" cmdlets available. They do not change anything and can provide vast amounts of information from one simple line.

You can type in the cmdlet directly or copy and paste.

It is also very easy to search, filter, and sort Get results with just a few extra words and structure.

And there are scripts available to do backups. 🛑

However you do not and should not run such scripts until you are able to fully understand in detail what the scripts are doing.
 
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Rodion15

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Will second @USAFRet

For example, open Powershell as Admin

Run (cmdlet)

Get-ComputerInfo

or

Get-Netadapter

or

Get-Disk


= = = =

Powershell has quite a number of "Get" cmdlets available. They do not change anything and can provide vast amounts of information from one simple line.

You can type in the cmdlet directly or copy and paste.

It is also very easy to search, filter, and sort Get results with just a few extra words and structure.

And there are scripts available to do backups. 🛑

However you do not and should not run such scripts until you are able to fully understand in detail what the scripts are doing.
Those Powershell commands are amazing, especially get-computerinfo. I'll give some time to learning Powershell. Thank you.
 

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