Question is it worth upgrading existing CPU

Oct 6, 2019
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I am currently undecided if i should upgrade my sons rig from a 2500k to a 3770k (Just CPU), or buy a 9700k
(Bundle) and give him my 7700k(Bundle), I have a 1070 and he has a 1060 (6GB) we are looking to play RD2 and not sure if a 3770k would hold up, really appreciate others 2 cents, Thanks
 

LordVile

Admirable
I am currently undecided if i should upgrade my sons rig from a 2500k to a 3770k (Just CPU), or buy a 9700k
(Bundle) and give him my 7700k(Bundle), I have a 1070 and he has a 1060 (6GB) we are looking to play RD2 and not sure if a 3770k would hold up, really appreciate others 2 cents, Thanks
Well if you’d be upgrading to a 9700K you’d be swapping RAM and board too so I’d go Ryzen for better value. The 3770K would help but I don’t see much point investing in a platform that old especially when it’ll still cost your around £100-120 used when that’s where the R5 2600 sits new.
 
Oct 6, 2019
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Well if you’d be upgrading to a 9700K you’d be swapping RAM and board too so I’d go Ryzen for better value. The 3770K would help but I don’t see much point investing in a platform that old especially when it’ll still cost your around £100-120 used when that’s where the R5 2600 sits new.
Thank you for your thoughts.
 
Worth is something only YOU can determine.

It is worth doing some tests to see what might be your most effective upgrade.
Here is my stock approach:

Some games are graphics limited like fast action shooters.
Others are cpu core speed limited like strategy, sims, and mmo.
Multiplayer tends to like many threads.

You need to find out which.
------------------------------------------------------------
To help clarify your CPU/GPU options, run these two tests:

a) Run YOUR games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely more cpu limited.

b) Limit your cpu, either by reducing the OC, or, in windows power management, limit the maximum cpu% to something like 70%.
Go to control panel/power options/change plan settings/change advanced power settings/processor power management/maximum processor state/
This will simulate what a lack of cpu power will do.
Conversely what a 30% improvement in core speed might do.

You should also experiment with removing one or more cores/threads. You can do this in the windows msconfig boot advanced options option.
You will need to reboot for the change to take effect. Set the number of threads to less than you have.
This will tell you how sensitive your games are to the benefits of many threads.
If you see little difference, your game does not need all the threads you have.



It is possible that both tests are positive, indicating that you have a well balanced system,
and both cpu and gpu need to be upgraded to get better gaming FPS.
-------------------------------------------------------------

More than the cost involved, one of my problems with upgrading is what to do with my old system.
My sons and grandkids have been the been the beneficiaries of my castoffs to the point where they need no more. a good/bad problem to have.

I would be inclined to do the 9700K upgrade option and you both get something.
If gaming is your main purpose, there is no better processor than the 9700K.
 
Oct 6, 2019
11
1
15
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I am currently undecided if i should upgrade my sons rig from a 2500k to a 3770k (Just CPU), or buy a 9700k
(Bundle) and give him my 7700k(Bundle), I have a 1070 and he has a 1060 (6GB) we are looking to play RD2 and not sure if a 3770k would hold up, really appreciate others 2 cents, Thanks
If this is for gaming and regular work type stuff, it is not worth upgrading; there is a performance difference; however, in terms of tangible-while-doing things it is nil unless you keep an FPS counter going. There are some newer features like M2 SSDs and such that will benefit you in upgrading, but again, that doesn't do much outside help load times a bit. Even a 900 series (2009) holds up fine for modern games as long as you have a decent GPU. The biggest differences will be @1080p; but again, if you're not a over-obsessive FPS counter watcher, you're not going to notice and you'll be able to get 60-80FPS on Very High settings in most games. @1440p and above the FPS difference narrows drastically. I have everything from a Core2Duo to an i7 7800X with plenty in between (i7 930, 960, 980X, 4770K, 6700, 6850K, i5 6600K) with cards from the GTX 690 to the 2080Ti. Gaming on my i7 960 or 980X is plenty fine with a 980Ti/1070 in modern games. Overall CPU peformance increases have not been very impressive since the first gen i7s, they are incremental and dissipate quickly once you increase resolution and the work goes to the GPU. Since you are asking if it is "worth it" to upgrade from a 2500K to a 3770K or 7700K, then answer is no, not unless you obsess about frames per second, and especially not @1440p+.
 
Oct 6, 2019
4
0
10
0
Worth is something only YOU can determine.

It is worth doing some tests to see what might be your most effective upgrade.
Here is my stock approach:

Some games are graphics limited like fast action shooters.
Others are cpu core speed limited like strategy, sims, and mmo.
Multiplayer tends to like many threads.

You need to find out which.
------------------------------------------------------------
To help clarify your CPU/GPU options, run these two tests:

a) Run YOUR games, but lower your resolution and eye candy.
If your FPS increases, it indicates that your cpu is strong enough to drive a better graphics configuration.
If your FPS stays the same, you are likely more cpu limited.

b) Limit your cpu, either by reducing the OC, or, in windows power management, limit the maximum cpu% to something like 70%.
Go to control panel/power options/change plan settings/change advanced power settings/processor power management/maximum processor state/
This will simulate what a lack of cpu power will do.
Conversely what a 30% improvement in core speed might do.

You should also experiment with removing one or more cores/threads. You can do this in the windows msconfig boot advanced options option.
You will need to reboot for the change to take effect. Set the number of threads to less than you have.
This will tell you how sensitive your games are to the benefits of many threads.
If you see little difference, your game does not need all the threads you have.



It is possible that both tests are positive, indicating that you have a well balanced system,
and both cpu and gpu need to be upgraded to get better gaming FPS.
-------------------------------------------------------------

More than the cost involved, one of my problems with upgrading is what to do with my old system.
My sons and grandkids have been the been the beneficiaries of my castoffs to the point where they need no more. a good/bad problem to have.

I would be inclined to do the 9700K upgrade option and you both get something.
If gaming is your main purpose, there is no better processor than the 9700K.
Thank you for your reply, I forgot to mention i game 1440p/144hz, went to 1080p all low settings for BFV MP for the high refresh joy, you are completely right, ultimately it is something i can only determine and thanks to the help here i am set on 9700k and handing my 7700k to the lad, nice one on the info regarding the cores will check that out,
 
Oct 6, 2019
4
0
10
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If this is for gaming and regular work type stuff, it is not worth upgrading; there is a performance difference; however, in terms of tangible-while-doing things it is nil unless you keep an FPS counter going. There are some newer features like M2 SSDs and such that will benefit you in upgrading, but again, that doesn't do much outside help load times a bit. Even a 900 series (2009) holds up fine for modern games as long as you have a decent GPU. The biggest differences will be @1080p; but again, if you're not a over-obsessive FPS counter watcher, you're not going to notice and you'll be able to get 60-80FPS on Very High settings in most games. @1440p and above the FPS difference narrows drastically. I have everything from a Core2Duo to an i7 7800X with plenty in between (i7 930, 960, 980X, 4770K, 6700, 6850K, i5 6600K) with cards from the GTX 690 to the 2080Ti. Gaming on my i7 960 or 980X is plenty fine with a 980Ti/1070 in modern games. Overall CPU peformance increases have not been very impressive since the first gen i7s, they are incremental and dissipate quickly once you increase resolution and the work goes to the GPU. Since you are asking if it is "worth it" to upgrade from a 2500K to a 3770K or 7700K, then answer is no, not unless you obsess about frames per second, and especially not @1440p+.
Thank you for your reply, My son's rig is 1080p @ 144hz, I decided to get myself a 9700k bundle and give my 7700k bundle to him and sell on the 2500k bundle, appreciate you reply.
 

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