Question Is it worth upgrading my 7600k to a Ryzen 5 3600

Dammie

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In most games I get more than 60fps, but there is often stuttering which drives me crazy sometimes. For example in games like Battlefield V and Ghost Recon.


The CPU usage is mostly 100% when it happens (there are no background applications) and I already overclocked it to 4,3GHz.


Something that worries me though is that the 3600 has less clock speed, on the other hand more cores and threads.


(I have a 1070ti and 16gb 3200MHz Ram btw)
 

Dammie

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Just my opinion, if its purely for gaming I dont think youd see a huge increase, more cores would be great for video editing and the likes or having multiple tasks open at once but I feel like games just wont utalise it enough to make it worth while, id say it would make alot more sense to go for a cpu with less threads and a higher clock speed for gaming, just personal opinion though I could be wrong, im not saying the 3600 is slower just that would it be worth the money to see a fairly marginal FPS increase?
So if I get it right, the higher clock speed is better for gaming and the more threads for multitasking?

It's also really cheap right now, I maybe have to pay like €50 if I sell my i5 and MB so that's why I am considering it.
 
Triple A titles listed above will 100% night and day run smoother on a 3600. The 3600 may have less clock speed however CLOCK FOR CLOCK the 3600 is better and more cores of slightly less frequency will allow the game to run smoother than less higher frequency cores pegged at 100% load. Black friday would be an excellent opportunity to upgrade for new and up coming triple A titles and that processor will last you years due to higher cache and superior multicore performance. Even after that, you'll have a plethora of higher tier chips to upgrade to in the future.
 
As hardware unboxed demonstrated, in 2019 games the 7600k will indeed stutter due to the weak 4 core nature.

Even a Ryzen 5 1600 is an upgrade to overall fps and smoothness in many titles, so a 3600 will be night and day difference.

For example, a 3600 performs like an i7 8700k.
 
Oct 6, 2019
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If you're having those kind of issues in Ghost Recon Wildlands; that's not the CPU, something else is going on. I don't get those issues with an i7 960@4.1Ghz with 12GB RAM and a GTX 980Ti @1080p/1440p. I also don't get it on an i5 4440 with a GTX 1060 3GB @1080p, 4770K@4.3Ghz with a GTX 1080@1080p, i7 980X@4.5Ghz with a Vega 56@1080p, i7 6700 with 980Ti @1080p/1440p.
 
I think some folks' rigs were rumored to be more stutter-prone at DirectX12 than in equally gorgeous Directx11 mode....

Not every 4c/4t owner experiences it, but, those needing frame rates above 60 FPS for 100+ Hz refresh also seem more noticing of when FPS drop below 60, etc...

In any event, the 3600 is a very large 'go to' these days, approximating the 8700K's gaming performance, which even though a 2 year old processor, is not a bad place to be. (If increased CPU funds are not overly prohibitive, I think I'd opt for the 3700, figuring the two extra cores might give some future gaming release 'breathing room'. but, the 3600 seems to do great in all of today's titles.
 
I think some folks' rigs were rumored to be more stutter-prone at DirectX12 than in equally gorgeous Directx11 mode....

Not every 4c/4t owner experiences it, but, those needing frame rates above 60 FPS for 100+ Hz refresh also seem more noticing of when FPS drop below 60, etc...

In any event, the 3600 is a very large 'go to' these days, approximating the 8700K's gaming performance, which even though a 2 year old processor, is not a bad place to be. (If increased CPU funds are not overly prohibitive, I think I'd opt for the 3700, figuring the two extra cores might give some future gaming release 'breathing room'. but, the 3600 seems to do great in all of today's titles.
I certainly did notice the stutter with my 4c/4t CPU, although it isn't a high end model.

Lemme say, 6c/12t is the bees knees.
 
Something that worries me though is that the 3600 has less clock speed, on the other hand more cores and threads.
Clock speed is only responsible for part of the overall performance of a processor.

If clock speed solely determined performance, the Intel Pentium 4 570 at 3.8ghz would be significantly faster than the Intel Core I7 920 at 2.6ghz.
But that isn't the case as the i7 920 is newer and has more cores than the Pentium. This is an exaggeration, however it does demonstrate the many factors that go into the performance of a CPU.

Look at the benchmarks for performance, not the spec sheet.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0uB17Io2is

This is the 3600x vs 8700k, but the 3600 and 3600x are nearly identical.

The 3600 performs roughly around an I7 8700k in games, even though the 8700k will run at a higher clock speed than the 3600.

This is part of the reason the Ryzen 5 3600 will run cooler and draw less power than an 8700k.

The real main benefit for gaming with the 8700k is the ability to overclock farther than the 3600.
 
i'm on 4 cores as well, but although with 8 threads (OC'd 7700K), I've not experienced any stutter in BF1(even in DirectX12) in my single player or 64 player games online...; but, certainly so many 4c/4t people have complained of the phenomena that the concerns must have merit.... (Maybe I was immune to detecting any stutter as I was playing 'well within my means' with a GTX1060, at 1080P, and on a 60 Hz refresh TV....? I suspect those needing much higher sustained FPS for 144 Hz monitors are likely much more vulnerable if the monitor breaks sync dropping below a certain refresh...)

The .1% lows being high enough are indeed much more important than having average FPS way higher than needed.
 

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