Question Is my 550w power supply enough

Obsnacks

Great
Sep 21, 2019
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I wanted to know if my 550w power supply is good enough for my build I have a core i5 9400f, rtx 2060 super, 2 120mm fans ,one cpu fan ,2x8 gigs of ram ,gigabyte z370 d3 motherboard one tb hard drive, 250gb m.2
 

R_1

Illustrious
Ambassador
if its new, it should be alright, do not use that after the warranty expires. after 2 years get rid of it.
one of the worst units EVGA sells. 516W available.
if you are looking to replace the CX-series from corsair is a good entry unit, 5 year warranty.
 
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King_V

Distinguished
The Corsair CX you linked is definitely far better than the EVGA one mentioned earlier. It's a budget model, I'd prefer to go with a Corsair TX or RM, or a Seasonic Focus, but the CX should do the job.

These are expensive parts: your CPU was about $150, and that 2060 Super is around $400. Power supply prices have gone up, but I'd say going up to the $90 to $110 range for a higher quality PSU is a wise investment to protect your expensive hardware.
 
Have you bought the psu, or are you shopping?
550w is enough assuming the psu delivers advertised power.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
I have no problem overprovisioning a PSU a bit. Say 20%.
It will allow for a stronger future graphics card upgrade.
It will run cooler, quieter, and more efficiently in the middle third of it's range.
A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.
I might look for a 650w unit, it should not cost much more.

Of more importance is quality.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.

Look for a tier 1/2, no less than 3 unit from a list such as this:

Consider spending a bit more up front foe a psu like the 650w seasonic focus gold
https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-focus-plus-650-gold-ssr-650fx-650w/p/N82E16817151186
Note the compact size , gold rating and 10 year warranty.
 

Obsnacks

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Sep 21, 2019
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i already have this in my computer for about a year now i built it the Christmas of 2018 and is it still safe to use i don't want to damage anything and all my money be wasted i wanted to know these things because i ordered my rtx 2060 super and i wanted to know if my power supply can handle it and now their are other things to worry about
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
Are their any other options that aren’t that expensive
The Corsair CX series tends to be the least expensive worth buying. This isn't some crazy tier-one Titanium unit; it's a decent, well-recommended budget GPU.

Unfortunately, the cost of a GPU also must include the cost of a PSU to protect it. It's a bit like buying a Lamborghini and then running out of money to pay the car insurance; if you couldn't pay for the car insurance, you couldn't really afford the Lamborghini.
 
Reactions: King_V
I suppose we are a bit paranoid about psu quality.
Since you own the unit, go ahead and use it.
You have sufficient power and so long as you have had no indications of psu issues, I think you are safe enough for now.
What you can do:

Do not buy a factory overclocked RTX2060 super; stock is plenty strong.
Do not try to overclock it yourself either.
See that your psu has no cooling obstructions.
Insure that your psu is plugged into a grounded outlet.
The first signs of a psu issue might be artifacts on the display or unexplained shutdowns.
Another sign might be very high fan cooling noise from the psu.
 
Reactions: King_V
The Corsair CX series tends to be the least expensive worth buying. This isn't some crazy tier-one Titanium unit; it's a decent, well-recommended budget GPU.

Unfortunately, the cost of a GPU also must include the cost of a PSU to protect it. It's a bit like buying a Lamborghini and then running out of money to pay the car insurance; if you couldn't pay for the car insurance, you couldn't really afford the Lamborghini.
Buying crappy quality fuel/lubricant would be a more accurate analogy. You can buy all the expensive cars you want, but if you run it with "fake" gas from shady sellers it won't be good whether you notice it immediately or not.

I would definitely upgrade to that Focus GX right after I have the money.
 

R_1

Illustrious
Ambassador
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R_1

Illustrious
Ambassador
the GX is a focus model. the other is a focus plus, a slightly better unit. same warranty.
consider the price difference express shipping. can't go wrong with either of those in all honesty.
 

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