Question Is my brand new PSU defective/burnt out?

Aug 21, 2020
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Hey guys! Hope everyone is doing well today. I have a pretty big issue with a PC I built from somewhat old parts. The power supply started off running consistently, and I actually had it running (no video card though) on the BIOS screen for some time. It properly read and showed my CPU and RAM information. Then, when I went to restart it, it just stopped turning on. When I turn the PSU switch off and back on and start the PC again, it flickers for a split second then it turns off. Sometimes, if I connect a GPU to the motherboard, it will run for a few seconds, shut off, turn on and shut off within a split second again. Here are my specs, followed by more details:

GPU: Gigabyte GeForce 1080 Superclocked (used for maybe a year)
CPU: Intel i7 4790K Unlocked (No OC) (used for maybe 3 years)
Motherboard: Asus Motherboard Q87M-E/CSM (I forget....used for a few years at least)
PSU: Gamdias KRATOS M1-750B / 750W 80 PLUS Bronze certified ATX12V v2.2 Power Supply w/ Active PFC (brand spankin' new)

So I cannot test a different CPU or anything because my personal PC mobo has a different socket. I've gotten to a point now where I'm trying to jumpstart the PSU, and here is what happens. I put a wire or clip to jump the 4th and 5th pins from the top left row (with the clip facing up) like I should to start the PSU, and even when it is not connected to anything at all and I jumpstart it, the fan starts and stops instantly every single time. I'm afraid to try this PSU in my personal PC or try my personal PSU in this PC because I really, really don't want this possibly defective PSU messing anything up on my PC and I also don't want my own PSU to get fried by a bad board. I'm basically not entirely sure if the board or the PSU is the problem. I also don't want to go ahead and buy new components and then also have to buy a new PSU in addition to CPU, Mobo and RAM. Anyone have any ideas of what might be the problem component? I can also tell you I have tried starting the PC with only the 24-pin connector attached to the board, and without the CPU at all, both with and without the 8 pin (4+4) connector. As far as I know the PSU and fans should still be running constantly, but of course it won't post without a CPU. Either way the PSU starts and stops instantly. Sometimes, if I have a GPU plugged in as well, it will go for a few seconds longer and then stop, then it will not start again until I reset the PSU. Thing is, I don't believe the GPU is the problem, because the PC still doesn't start without the GPU plugged in.

Also, when I was first trying to start this PC with the GPU in, the white LED would just blink on the GPU and it wouldn't post. I cannot get it to do this anymore, it keeps shutting off.

Sorry if I was a little confusing. I've been running around like a chicken with its head cut off trying to figure out what exactly is the culprit component. I'd be happy to provide any more info.
 
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Aug 21, 2020
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That's actually not enough information. There are great power supplies out there, and there are awful ones (the phrase "dumpster fire" comes to mind). We'd need to know the brand and EXACT model number.
Whoops, I copied and pasted the header from a website but I didn't even see that it didn't include the actual model of the PSU. It's a KRATOS M1-750B. Here is a link to the manufacturer page: https://www.gamdias.com/component/index.php/en/psu-power/kratos-m1-750b

since you have another system on hand could you try is psu in this old build .
I could try it but I'm kinda paranoid about that. Is there no chance the board could have messed up the PSU to begin with and if so, is there a possibility that the motherboard could fry my other PSU? The one in the PC that I actually use is a 1,000W. I'm not a novice at this but not an expert either. I've had a lot of weird technical issues in the past and the last thing I want to do is have to replace my working PSU.
 
Aug 21, 2020
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The PSU has RGB so it must be great :p
Lol I don't usually care about RGB but I went to Fry's and got it because they were trying to get rid of their product since business is so slow. It was like $40. Typically I don't go cheap on parts......my PC has an intel i9 9900K processor with liquid cooling, OC'd at 5.0 GHz, Nvidia 2080 Ti Founders Edition GPU, 64 GB Corsair Vengeance RAM (Overkill asf), and a Thermaltake 1,000W PSU. DESTROYS everything. I went cheapo on the PSU for this other system I used out of my old parts and the fact that the parts are old is making me wonder if the PSU is defective or if the board somehow caused it. Thing is though, the PSU actually didn't work from the beginning, so I think it's just defective. When connected to my 1080, the white LED just flashed and it never posted. That's abnormal. I have a PSU tester coming today so I can confirm that before I return it and try another one.
 
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Aug 21, 2020
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The one part you should NEVER cheap out on is the PSU.... and you hit rock bottom with that Gamdias.
That's what I thought. Better to go with a TT or Corsair. First and last time I go with a bargain product like that. the fact that when I jump the pins on the 24 pin connector (actually it's a crappy 20+4 pin...) and the fan stopped immediately, while it was not plugged into anything at all besides the AC adapter, should tell me the PSU is garbage.
 
That's what I thought. Better to go with a TT or Corsair. First and last time I go with a bargain product like that. the fact that when I jump the pins on the 24 pin connector (actually it's a crappy 20+4 pin...) and the fan stopped immediately, while it was not plugged into anything at all besides the AC adapter, should tell me the PSU is garbage.
You can actually do the same thing as the hand held tester with a paper clip and a DMM.

http://jongerow.com/PSU_test/index.html

Just "jump" the power on to ground, then probe the different voltages of the PSU with a DMM.

Also, just getting a PSU because it's Corsair or Thermaltake is not a good idea either. Those brands make a full gamut of different quality products. Some as bad as that Gamdias.
 
Aug 21, 2020
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You can actually do the same thing as the hand held tester with a paper clip and a DMM.

http://jongerow.com/PSU_test/index.html

Just "jump" the power on to ground, then probe the different voltages of the PSU with a DMM.

Also, just getting a PSU because it's Corsair or Thermaltake is not a good idea either. Those brands make a full gamut of different quality products. Some as bad as that Gamdias.
That's good to know, I just know that I have never gone cheap on PSUs before and I know those are generally good brands. I'd usually get a gold certified with more wattage than I need. What are some things to look out for?

As for the tester, that's also great to know as I do use a multimeter on a regular basis. I had $25 reward dollars on my Amazon card, making the tester free, so I got it. Lol. I will try the paperclip meter test.
 

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