[SOLVED] Is my cpu temp normal

Oct 29, 2019
5
0
10
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Intel pentium g2030 (Stock cooler)
Gt 730 2gb
8gb 1333mhz (4x2)
500gb hard drive
700 watts psu


When I'm gaming my cpu temp reaches up to 105 C. I dont experience any problems with that temperature being high but I just noticed that my temp was that high when my pc started freezing and then turns into a blue screen. It turns out that overheating was not the problem, instead, it was my hard drive. I changed my hard drive and everything works fine now. But, Im just a little bit bothered that when I searched that the temp should not exceed any further than 80 C. I haven't changed my heat sink's thermal paste since we bought this computer, can that be the problem? We bought this pc 6 or 7 years ago (2013)
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
MadsModsat,

The monitoring utility Maxell163 is using is Core Temp, which like Hardware Info, is frequently updated. Both are known to be quite accurate. Although Real Temp was developed specifically for Intel processors and most likely is still accurate for the Core i 3rd Generation Ivy Bridge Pentium G2030, Real Temp hasn't been updated for several years.

Maxell163,

105°C is "Throttle" temperature, and is the temperature at which the processor will "Throttle" or reduce its Clock speed and Core voltage to safeguard against thermal damage. This means that when a processor approaches Throttle temperature, it's already too hot. As a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature should be observed for ultimate stability, performance and longevity, Core temperatures should never exceed 85°C during stress testing, and should definitely be below 80°C when gaming.

The 65 Watt stock cooler for your 55 Watt Pentium G2030 is adequate to maintain safe temperatures while gaming. As MadsModsat suggested, dust and / or old thermal paste which has dried out may be the reason for your high Core temperatures. However, another common reason could be that the plastic "push-pins" that fasten the cooler to the motherboard have stretched over time, which causes poor contact pressure against the CPU resulting in high Core temperatures, and requires replacing the cooler.

Another common cause is that one of the push-pins has popped loose from the motherboard, which again causes poor contact pressure against the CPU resulting in high Core temperatures. Push pins can very easily pop loose, such as when the computer is moved or bumped or undergoes vibrations when being transported to a new location.

I suggest that you first check the case and cooler for dust, and verify that the CPU cooler fan hasn't failed. If it's running and is reasonably free of dust, then replacing the thermal paste is the second logical step. But to do this, you'll need to have new thermal paste on hand such as Arctic Cooling MX-4, and you'll have to deal with Intel's infamous and problematic push-pins.

The third logical step is to check for a loose push-pin which will also cause high Core temperatures. You can troubleshoot this problem by pushing firmly on each corner of the cooler for about 30 seconds while watching your load temperatures. When you see a significant drop, you've found the loose push-pin.

The push-pins can be deceivingly tricky to get them fully inserted through the motherboard and properly latched.

(1) To re-seat a single loose push-pin, rotate the head of the pin in the direction of the arrow counterclockwise 90° then retract the pin by pulling upward on the head. Rotate the head clockwise 90° to reset the latch, but do NOT push on the head of the pin yet.

(2) To get the pin fully inserted through the motherboard, push only on the leg, NOT on the head of the pin. Use a strong light to compare each pin to its neighboring pins.

(3) While holding the leg firmly against the motherboard with one hand, you can now push on the head of the pin with your other hand until the latch clicks.

(4) If you're re-seating the entire cooler, then be sure to latch the pins across from one another, rather than next to one another. Use an "X" pattern, so as to apply even pressure during installation.

Intel Stock Cooler Installation -
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qczGR4KMnY

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: WildCard999

MadsModsat

Prominent
Oct 10, 2019
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I don't recognize what software you are using for monitoring, could you specify which one?

105'c is a quite high temperature, and it should definately be posibble to reduce those temperatures to a lesser level, even with the box cooler.

But the reason why I asked about the software is, that sometimes some monitoring programs display false readings. So in connection to troubleshooting, it would make sense to verify the readings with a different program, to see if they display similar results. It is not a definitive test, but in my opinion worth spending a minute on.

RealTemp and HWInfo are often mentioned as reliable software.

Other than that, if you have had the CPU almost since launch, it would probably be a good idea to remove the old cooling paste, and perform a fresh application.

Even if you aren't really experiencing any porblems, in my opinion it would be worthwhile to try and reduce temperatures anyway in order to maintain optimal performance conditions

EDIT: Getting rid of any dust and other debris in fans or heatsinks could also be a way to improve cooling performance, if you haven't cleaned the PC recently

Since your system is still working fine, I would rule out CPU fan failure, since I would expect the PC to completely shut down with a faulty box cooler fan. But if you are struggeling to find something to spend time on, you could always take a quick look at the CPU fan, to confirm it is spinning when the system is powered on.
 
Last edited:

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
MadsModsat,

The monitoring utility Maxell163 is using is Core Temp, which like Hardware Info, is frequently updated. Both are known to be quite accurate. Although Real Temp was developed specifically for Intel processors and most likely is still accurate for the Core i 3rd Generation Ivy Bridge Pentium G2030, Real Temp hasn't been updated for several years.

Maxell163,

105°C is "Throttle" temperature, and is the temperature at which the processor will "Throttle" or reduce its Clock speed and Core voltage to safeguard against thermal damage. This means that when a processor approaches Throttle temperature, it's already too hot. As a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature should be observed for ultimate stability, performance and longevity, Core temperatures should never exceed 85°C during stress testing, and should definitely be below 80°C when gaming.

The 65 Watt stock cooler for your 55 Watt Pentium G2030 is adequate to maintain safe temperatures while gaming. As MadsModsat suggested, dust and / or old thermal paste which has dried out may be the reason for your high Core temperatures. However, another common reason could be that the plastic "push-pins" that fasten the cooler to the motherboard have stretched over time, which causes poor contact pressure against the CPU resulting in high Core temperatures, and requires replacing the cooler.

Another common cause is that one of the push-pins has popped loose from the motherboard, which again causes poor contact pressure against the CPU resulting in high Core temperatures. Push pins can very easily pop loose, such as when the computer is moved or bumped or undergoes vibrations when being transported to a new location.

I suggest that you first check the case and cooler for dust, and verify that the CPU cooler fan hasn't failed. If it's running and is reasonably free of dust, then replacing the thermal paste is the second logical step. But to do this, you'll need to have new thermal paste on hand such as Arctic Cooling MX-4, and you'll have to deal with Intel's infamous and problematic push-pins.

The third logical step is to check for a loose push-pin which will also cause high Core temperatures. You can troubleshoot this problem by pushing firmly on each corner of the cooler for about 30 seconds while watching your load temperatures. When you see a significant drop, you've found the loose push-pin.

The push-pins can be deceivingly tricky to get them fully inserted through the motherboard and properly latched.

(1) To re-seat a single loose push-pin, rotate the head of the pin in the direction of the arrow counterclockwise 90° then retract the pin by pulling upward on the head. Rotate the head clockwise 90° to reset the latch, but do NOT push on the head of the pin yet.

(2) To get the pin fully inserted through the motherboard, push only on the leg, NOT on the head of the pin. Use a strong light to compare each pin to its neighboring pins.

(3) While holding the leg firmly against the motherboard with one hand, you can now push on the head of the pin with your other hand until the latch clicks.

(4) If you're re-seating the entire cooler, then be sure to latch the pins across from one another, rather than next to one another. Use an "X" pattern, so as to apply even pressure during installation.

Intel Stock Cooler Installation -
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qczGR4KMnY

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: WildCard999

MadsModsat

Prominent
Oct 10, 2019
807
152
640
43
The monitoring utility Maxell163 is using is Core Temp, which like Hardware Info, is frequently updated. Both are known to be quite accurate. Although Real Temp was developed specifically for Intel processors and most likely is still accurate for the Core i 3rd Generation Ivy Bridge Pentium G2030, Real Temp hasn't been updated for several years.
I apologize, I got the names the wrong way round. I didn't mean recommend outdated software, that is usually something I would try not to do

I personally use HWInfo, as I also recommended, but with the intentions to add some options for OP, I manged to confuse things instead

Next time I'll make sure I don't make the same mistake
 
Reactions: CompuTronix

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