Question Is my GPU the weak link?

mricon

Commendable
Feb 18, 2017
21
0
1,510
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Hi everyone - something I would appreciate help on please.

I have a general purpose Dell PC (specs below) which I bought quite a few years ago and I have gradually upgraded over the years with better RAM, SSD and GPU etc. It's been a great, solid, reliable PC for me. However...

More recently, I have started using it it for more 'serious' gaming (Apex Legends at the moment) and it's the first time I've really noticed it struggling. The settings are pretty much all on low/medium.

I would like to improve my setup to make it perform better and have a budget of around $250, maybe more. Eventually I will get a new Gaming PC but, for now, I just want the best upgrade I can for the money.

When I run UserBenchmark, all my components score in the region of 55-60% 'above average' but the GPU score is only 22% 'poor'. Here is my setup....

  • Dell XPS 8300, with stock PSU
  • Intel Core i5 2300 (Socket 1155LGA) @ 2.8 GHz
  • Dell 0Y2MRG Motherboard
  • 16GB DDR3 1333 MHz 4x4Gb
  • MSI NVIDIA GTX 750Ti 2 GB 1020 MHz Dvi-D/HDMI Pci-E Graphics Card
  • I run two monitors one a 23" Dell which came with it and an LG Ultrawide 28"
  • Sandisk SSD Plus 480Gb running Windows 10
Is the GPU my best upgrade? If so, what's the best I could get for my motherboard? Any recommendations please?

Thank you.
 

prince_xaine

Notable
Feb 3, 2018
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Yes, the graphics card is the weak link in your build. A 750 Ti is a pretty old card. The best value for performance right now really seems to be the GTX 1060.

You should get the GTX 1060 6GB and a new power supply to go with it. When you get a gaming computer, migrate the power supply and card with it. That's how I built my computer. (Total cost should be under the amount you want to spend.) I recommend EVGA Modular power supply.
 
Reactions: mricon

mricon

Commendable
Feb 18, 2017
21
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1,510
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Yeah you could do with a better CPU and GPU to be honest.

If you dont want to do a new build, then I would look for a used i7 2600/3770 to drop in, and a 1050 ti.
Thank you. Just a quick question...

Will that GPU fit my PC easily? - I am just checking because when I upgraded before, at the time, my friend (who picked installed it for me) said he needed to pick the 750Ti to fit my board / case.

Hope that makes sense!
 

RobCrezz

Titan
Herald
Should fit fine, all graphics cards these days use pci-e slot.

The only issue you may have, is that some prebuilts like dell and hp often just dont work with modern graphics cards...


Ideally, you would do a brand new build if you have budget for it.
 

mricon

Commendable
Feb 18, 2017
21
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1,510
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Should fit fine, all graphics cards these days use pci-e slot.

The only issue you may have, is that some prebuilts like dell and hp often just dont work with modern graphics cards...


Ideally, you would do a brand new build if you have budget for it.
Thank you, one final (I hope!) question please - if I do decide to build a new PC are their any components I could switch across?

On second thoughts - could I buy a PC and skip the hard drive but put my existing SSD in it? Is it that simple?

Thanks
 

prince_xaine

Notable
Feb 3, 2018
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Should fit fine, all graphics cards these days use pci-e slot.

The only issue you may have, is that some prebuilts like dell and hp often just dont work with modern graphics cards...


Ideally, you would do a brand new build if you have budget for it.
Hmm out of the dozens of computers I have built, never has an OEM computer not worked with a graphics card. I've slapped a GTX 1080 ti into computers from 2007 and haven't had any issues besides awful bottlenecks from the processor.

Reference?
 

prince_xaine

Notable
Feb 3, 2018
768
6
1,165
84
Thank you, one final (I hope!) question please - if I do decide to build a new PC are their any components I could switch across?

On second thoughts - could I buy a PC and skip the hard drive but put my existing SSD in it? Is it that simple?

Thanks
If you buy a new graphics card and power supply now, and save for the other parts later, you can migrate anything that fits in your new motherboard. For example, if you buy an Asrock Z77 Extreme4 board, you will be able to use everything you have, as the Z77 is from the LGA1155 series processors. So the RAM and CPU, and everything else would work.

If you buy something newer, you will not be able to use your processor, cpu cooler or memory, but you would still be able to use your SSD (no re-install of windows necessary), your graphics card and power supply.


My original system was this:
Motherboard: Optiplex 7010 MT(0GY6Y8)
Processor: i5-3470
Memory: 2x4 GB Hynix DDR3
HDD: Western Digital Blue 500GB
Graphics: None
Power: OEM power supply

Just like you, (probably) I was given a computer someone else didn't want. It was my first computer. It couldn't play games, so I bought a GTX 1080 Ti, Samsung 850 Evo, EVGA 850 P2 and a i7-3770K for about $1000. (used parts)

So now it looks like this:
Mainboard: Optiplex 7010 MT (0GY6Y8)
Processor: i7-3770K @3.5 GHz
Memory: 2x4 GB Hynix DDR3
SSD: Samsung 850 Evo 500GB
HDD: Western Digital Blue 500 GB
Graphics: Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini
Power: EVGA 850 P2 80+ Platinum

Then finally when I had money again a few months later I bought a Asrock Z77 Extreme4 motherboard, Hyper 212 Evo, a decent case and 2x8 GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 @1600 MHz for around $400-$500

So now it looks like this:
Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Extreme4
Processor: i7-3770K @4.6 GHz
Cooler: Hyper 212 Evo
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro DDR3 @2133 MHz
SSD: Samsung 850 Evo 500 GB
HDD: Western Digital Blue 500 GB
Graphics: Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini
Power: EVGA 850 P2 80+ Platinum

I'd say in my case the biggest compromise was the small form factor graphics card, but I think you get the idea. The sky is the limit with PC building. Plan ahead, make a budget, buy over time if you have to. Hope this helps.
 
Reactions: mricon

RobCrezz

Titan
Herald
Hmm out of the dozens of computers I have built, never has an OEM computer not worked with a graphics card. I've slapped a GTX 1080 ti into computers from 2007 and haven't had any issues besides awful bottlenecks from the processor.

Reference?
About 100 or so threads on here mostly, older HP and Dell systems just refusing to boot with new graphics card.

https://www.google.com/search?q=hp+wont+work+with+graphics+card&rlz=1C1GCEA_enGB780GB780&oq=hp+wont+work+with+graphics+card&aqs=chrome..69i57.5735j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GCEA_enGB780GB780&ei=p0FoXM6SFOWE1fAPl4-awA0&q=dell+wont+work+with+graphics+card&oq=dell+wont+work+with+graphics+card&gs_l=psy-ab.3...42004.42971..43311...0.0..0.48.179.4......0....1..gws-wiz.......0i71.G4nO0F6WI1o

Depends on the model and what motherboard, but happens enough to mention it as a warning.
 

mricon

Commendable
Feb 18, 2017
21
0
1,510
0
If you buy a new graphics card and power supply now, and save for the other parts later, you can migrate anything that fits in your new motherboard. For example, if you buy an Asrock Z77 Extreme4 board, you will be able to use everything you have, as the Z77 is from the LGA1155 series processors. So the RAM and CPU, and everything else would work.

If you buy something newer, you will not be able to use your processor, cpu cooler or memory, but you would still be able to use your SSD (no re-install of windows necessary), your graphics card and power supply.


My original system was this:
Motherboard: Optiplex 7010 MT(0GY6Y8)
Processor: i5-3470
Memory: 2x4 GB Hynix DDR3
HDD: Western Digital Blue 500GB
Graphics: None
Power: OEM power supply

Just like you, (probably) I was given a computer someone else didn't want. It was my first computer. It couldn't play games, so I bought a GTX 1080 Ti, Samsung 850 Evo, EVGA 850 P2 and a i7-3770K for about $1000. (used parts)

So now it looks like this:
Mainboard: Optiplex 7010 MT (0GY6Y8)
Processor: i7-3770K @3.5 GHz
Memory: 2x4 GB Hynix DDR3
SSD: Samsung 850 Evo 500GB
HDD: Western Digital Blue 500 GB
Graphics: Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini
Power: EVGA 850 P2 80+ Platinum

Then finally when I had money again a few months later I bought a Asrock Z77 Extreme4 motherboard, Hyper 212 Evo, a decent case and 2x8 GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 @1600 MHz for around $400-$500

So now it looks like this:
Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Extreme4
Processor: i7-3770K @4.6 GHz
Cooler: Hyper 212 Evo
Memory: Corsair Vengeance Pro DDR3 @2133 MHz
SSD: Samsung 850 Evo 500 GB
HDD: Western Digital Blue 500 GB
Graphics: Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini
Power: EVGA 850 P2 80+ Platinum

I'd say in my case the biggest compromise was the small form factor graphics card, but I think you get the idea. The sky is the limit with PC building. Plan ahead, make a budget, buy over time if you have to. Hope this helps.
Thank you.
 

prince_xaine

Notable
Feb 3, 2018
768
6
1,165
84
Okay in both cases, the person placing the graphics card in either had secure boot enabled or had a 32-bit version of windows. Unless the manufacturer of the board did not place a PCI-e slot on the board, it WILL accept a graphics card as long as you meet the power requirements, the slot is 3.0 (though they are backwards compatible) and it fits properly in the chassis.

The OP of this thread has a video card in their computer, so as long as they are able to get a new power supply (and it fits) and the card fits in the case, they should have no issues.

Not that I am trying to "prove you wrong" or anything, because it's not like that, I just want to help you too in making sure you understand it's not random that it doesn't work in older builds, it's usually just a configuration thing.
 

RobCrezz

Titan
Herald
Okay in both cases, the person placing the graphics card in either had secure boot enabled or had a 32-bit version of windows. Unless the manufacturer of the board did not place a PCI-e slot on the board, it WILL accept a graphics card as long as you meet the power requirements, the slot is 3.0 (though they are backwards compatible) and it fits properly in the chassis.

The OP of this thread has a video card in their computer, so as long as they are able to get a new power supply (and it fits) and the card fits in the case, they should have no issues.

Not that I am trying to "prove you wrong" or anything, because it's not like that, I just want to help you too in making sure you understand it's not random that it doesn't work in older builds, it's usually just a configuration thing.
That's not the case though, some older OEM systems simply will not work with some newer cards.

Its not always dependant on the GPU either, more to the bios on the card. Even with secure boot off, running latest bios etc, they can just sit on a flashing cursor on the screen and will not boot.

Trust me, i'm not making it up, its a genuine issue even if you have not seen it with your own eyes. Not saying its going to happen with this one.
 

prince_xaine

Notable
Feb 3, 2018
768
6
1,165
84
That's not the case though, some older OEM systems simply will not work with some newer cards.

Its not always dependant on the GPU either, more to the bios on the card. Even with secure boot off, running latest bios etc, they can just sit on a flashing cursor on the screen and will not boot.

Trust me, i'm not making it up, its a genuine issue even if you have not seen it with your own eyes. Not saying its going to happen with this one.
Alright, I'll take your word for it. In any event, at least most old computers and oems work fine :)
 

mricon

Commendable
Feb 18, 2017
21
0
1,510
0
Yeah you could do with a better CPU and GPU to be honest.

If you dont want to do a new build, then I would look for a used i7 2600/3770 to drop in, and a 1050 ti.
Can I just check please?...

My 750ti plugs directly into my motherboard with no additional power, will a 1050ti need that? If so, how can I check if I can do that?

Thank you.
 

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