[SOLVED] Is my motherboard broken?

Sep 1, 2019
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I have

B360M PRO VH motherboard
CX450M power supply
i5-8400 cpu
single stick 16gb ram
windows 10
Kingdian 1tb ssd.

I just installed a new GPU (Radeon 580 8gb) and nothing would run. I tried putting back my old GPU( MSI 710 1gb) still nothing. The power supply fan won't spin no lights on the motherboard would light up, nothing. The only thing that happens is a little square heat sink (1inch x 1inch) heats up, it's right by the GPU slot. I couldn't even find out what its purpose was or what it's called.
Any help is appreciated.
How can this be fixed?
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Where did you buy this graphics card from? Not that it REALLY matters at this point, but the bottom line is that it is likely this is a card that was either returned because it had a problem and was shipped back out, or just HAD a problem, and has taken the motherboard out with it.

There is really nothing we can tell you for certain at this point.

Let's take some basic steps. Unplug the PSU from the motherboard and the wall. Flip the power supply switch to the off position on the back and let it sit for about ten minutes. Then, plug it back into the wall, flip the switch back to the on position and perform this test with it unplugged from the motherboard.

Also, it would be a good idea to unplug EVERYTHING from the motherboard and check for any bent over pins that might have been damaged while plugging something in including those going to the graphics card AND on the power supply end where the cables plug in there.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixcWCrYpw3Y



If it fails the paper clip test, then you need to start with a new PSU and go from there. I really doubt it's just a faulty PSU because that would be unlikely to heat up the chipset if nothing else was working, but it might definitely be the PSU, AND something else like the motherboard OR the motherboard AND graphics card. Something has almost certainly shat the bed in this equation and I'd be very surprised if the motherboard wasn't a big part of the overall picture but it might not be the ONLY part.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Your PSU is grossly underpowered and potentially way below acceptable quality, for that graphics card.

You need a very good 550w unit or a halfway decent 650w unit for the RX 580. Or at least that is what is commonly recommended.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

Whether you can get by with a lower capacity unit is another story, but you'd want a very high quality unit to try running that graphics card on a 450w unit and that CX450M, isn't. It's an "ok" unit for a slot powered card, but anything beyond that is not a good pairing.

There are no heat sinks that should "heat up" or "light up" on your graphics card. Sounds like something is directly shorted.

A picture would be helpful.



I believe I would first try switching off the PSU on the back of the PSU by moving it to the "0" position, unplugging it from the wall, remove the RX 580, remove the CMOS battery for five minutes and DURING those five minutes press the power button on the case continuously for 30 seconds. Reinstall the CMOS battery, install the GT 710, plug the PSU back into the wall and flip the switch back on, to the "I" position, then try to power on the unit.

If nothing happens, I would either test the power supply or replace it.

How long has that CX450M been in service?

Where did the RX 580 come from? New or used?

Was everything working normally with NO issues prior to installing the RX 580?
 
Sep 1, 2019
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I did the thing where you wait 5 min spam the button without battery and put back old GPU, still. Nothing is happening the square is heating up.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
PCPP is not who you ask for power supply capacity recommendations. Nor should you use any kind of "PSU calculator". Avoid doing that.

Use the recommendations at RealHardTechX and you will never go wrong. The recommendations found there are a result of extensive REAL WORLD testing using average baseline systems. You can assume there is a small amount of headroom added to accommodate the idea that many users will be incorporating mediocre quality power supplies into their build, and that THOSE power supplies will be unable to continuously supply their full rated wattage under 40°C or higher conditions, so a small amount of padding for safety is acceptable and wise. If you have a very good unit, you can MAYBE, in SOME cases, take about 50w off those recommendations but personally I'd much rather see a unit that is about 100w OVER those recommendations be used for the sake of quiet fan operation and unit longevity. Cooler running power supplies last a whole lot longer.

Beyond that, your CXm unit is both under powered AND less than desirable quality for the card you are trying to power. It could be the entire problem, or it could only be a part of the problem, but in any case, it is A problem.

If the heatsink for the motherboard chipset is getting hot, then that is a serious problem and likely tells us there is a direct short somewhere on the motherboard. It's a rather low end board to start with so a quality control flaw wouldn't be terribly surprising, but it would be MORE likely that something else has caused it such as user error in installation in some way. Hard to say that, and I certainly don't mean to point fingers, but that is USUALLY the case in cases like this. Something plugged in wrong, CPU installed wrong or bent pins on the motherboard. Memory installed wrong. Graphics card installed wrong or not fully seated. Lot's of things. Motherboard standoff in the wrong place under the motherboard where there is no matching mounting hole in the board.

Something.

How do you know the chipset heatsink is heating up or getting hot. Is it getting hot enough to glow or let off smoke?
 
Sep 1, 2019
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How do you know the chipset heatsink is heating up or getting hot. Is it getting hot enough to glow or let off smoke?

I just touch it. Overtime it cools off if the power supply is off but if I turn the power supply on with my old card in, no fans spin not even the powersupply fan and that heatsink starts to get hot. Everything was fine before I tried putting in the new card for the 5 months the PC worked perfectly.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Where did you buy this graphics card from? Not that it REALLY matters at this point, but the bottom line is that it is likely this is a card that was either returned because it had a problem and was shipped back out, or just HAD a problem, and has taken the motherboard out with it.

There is really nothing we can tell you for certain at this point.

Let's take some basic steps. Unplug the PSU from the motherboard and the wall. Flip the power supply switch to the off position on the back and let it sit for about ten minutes. Then, plug it back into the wall, flip the switch back to the on position and perform this test with it unplugged from the motherboard.

Also, it would be a good idea to unplug EVERYTHING from the motherboard and check for any bent over pins that might have been damaged while plugging something in including those going to the graphics card AND on the power supply end where the cables plug in there.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixcWCrYpw3Y



If it fails the paper clip test, then you need to start with a new PSU and go from there. I really doubt it's just a faulty PSU because that would be unlikely to heat up the chipset if nothing else was working, but it might definitely be the PSU, AND something else like the motherboard OR the motherboard AND graphics card. Something has almost certainly shat the bed in this equation and I'd be very surprised if the motherboard wasn't a big part of the overall picture but it might not be the ONLY part.
 
Sep 1, 2019
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I bought the graphics card from newegg. Well. All of my PSU cables are black but I still did the test by looking at the cable arrangement, the fan spins everything is good. The motherboard is fried. Thank you for your help. I don't really know much about computer, my job is woodwork and such. Thermaltake Smart 700W ATX 12V V2.3/EPS 12V 80 Plus Certified Active PFC Power Supply, do you think this would be good for the new graphics card?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Honestly, I'd avoid all Thermaltake units EXCEPT for the Toughpower models.

Here is a list of my recommendations and some extra information to help with selecting a power supply. If the motherboard is dead, I would avoid connecting a new power supply to it. I'm very skeptical in this case of installing that graphics card as well. I think I would immediately return the graphics card AND I'd file an RMA on the motherboard. You may be able to get it replaced for free as it should still be under warranty.

 
Sep 1, 2019
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The motherboard died probably because I put the wrong cables in. The cable that has type 4 written on it, I put that in the card, but the side that said pcle I put it in the power supply. I think that killed the board :/ do you think the card might be dead or no? When I first plugged it in its fans didn't move so I suppose that no electricity went through it. Yea I'm buying a new motherboard too.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, I think you are correct. I think that likely killed the PSU, motherboard and graphics card. That sucks. It's a lesson learned though. Be SURE what you are plugging in and WHERE you are plugging it into, BEFORE you do it or at least before you power anything on.

It never hurts to come here and ask questions FIRST. Myself, and many others here, are perfectly willing to help you anytime you need help with questions like that no matter how basic they might seem. Sometimes you might have to be a little patient though as many of us are only online here at certain hours of the day since we mostly all have jobs during the day, but if you ask a question directly or create a thread and shoot a PM, usually one of us will get to you before the day is done unless it's a very unusual circumstance where we happen to not be online that day.

Anyhow, I hope you have better luck going forward and again, if I can help you to avoid similar mistakes in the future, don't hesitate to ask. IF I can help, or many others here, we will.

Better to feel a little silly, if that, then have to replace hardware. Ouch.
 

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