[SOLVED] Is my motherboard broken?

Mar 13, 2020
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Specs:
Motherboard: Asus Maximus VIII Hero
CPU: Intel i7 6700K
RAM: G.Skill Trident Z 2x8GB
PSU: EVGA SuperNova NEX 650W

Hi,

I've been using my self-built PC for nearly four years when my PC suddenly shut down after booting today.
My motherboard has been completely dead since then, no active LEDs and no fans spinning (neither CPU fan, nor PSU or case fans).
I have tried all buttons on my motherboard, no response at all.
I have tried the PSU jumper test with the EVGA Detection Tool, which got my PSU fan to spin up.
The last time I changed any components or opened the case at all was months ago. I moved about a month ago, but that's about it.
If this was a CPU/RAM/whatever problem, the motherboard would at least give me some kind of signal, right?
Should I assume that my motherboard is dead? It was pretty expensive, so that would suck.

Thanks in advance for any advice.
 

Eximo

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Just seeing the PSU fan spin doesn't mean the PSU is working. You would at least need to check the open circuit voltages with a multimeter. 12V might be working, but 5V might not, for example. (And the fan might run off of an internal power supply, separate from the supply rails)

CPU/Motherboard is a bit difficult to troubleshoot without another CPU. About the only time I recommend taking it to a shop, just to get confirmation the motherboard is bad/good. Or pick yourself up a cheap Pentium to test with.

Dead CPU means no processing capability, so no brain to run POST codes. I think your board has CPU less flashing but the manual doesn't make it super clear, take the CPU out and see if it has any behavior.

And that raises another point, you might need to flash the BIOS if it has gotten corrupted somehow. That would be a last resort if nothing else turns up. Can't hurt a brick after all.
 
Reactions: bananas638

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Just seeing the PSU fan spin doesn't mean the PSU is working. You would at least need to check the open circuit voltages with a multimeter. 12V might be working, but 5V might not, for example. (And the fan might run off of an internal power supply, separate from the supply rails)

CPU/Motherboard is a bit difficult to troubleshoot without another CPU. About the only time I recommend taking it to a shop, just to get confirmation the motherboard is bad/good. Or pick yourself up a cheap Pentium to test with.

Dead CPU means no processing capability, so no brain to run POST codes. I think your board has CPU less flashing but the manual doesn't make it super clear, take the CPU out and see if it has any behavior.

And that raises another point, you might need to flash the BIOS if it has gotten corrupted somehow. That would be a last resort if nothing else turns up. Can't hurt a brick after all.
 
Reactions: bananas638
Mar 13, 2020
5
0
10
0
Just seeing the PSU fan spin doesn't mean the PSU is working. You would at least need to check the open circuit voltages with a multimeter. 12V might be working, but 5V might not, for example. (And the fan might run off of an internal power supply, separate from the supply rails)

CPU/Motherboard is a bit difficult to troubleshoot without another CPU. About the only time I recommend taking it to a shop, just to get confirmation the motherboard is bad/good. Or pick yourself up a cheap Pentium to test with.

Dead CPU means no processing capability, so no brain to run POST codes. I think your board has CPU less flashing but the manual doesn't make it super clear, take the CPU out and see if it has any behavior.

And that raises another point, you might need to flash the BIOS if it has gotten corrupted somehow. That would be a last resort if nothing else turns up. Can't hurt a brick after all.
Thanks for the reply!
I've tried two different PSUs, same result. Taking the CPU out had no effect either.
I'm getting a new motherboard to see if that fixes the problem.
Just to make sure, is it safe to use my PSU on the new motherboard? Could my PSU have somehow broken the old motherboard?
 
Mar 13, 2020
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Typically no, but anything is possible. Really only one way to find out.
So I installed a new motherboard (MSI Tomahawk Max) with a new CPU (Ryzen 7 3700X).
Still, nothing is powering up in my system.
The only thing I can think of is that I maybe didn't push the CPU in enough? I just put the CPU on the tray carefully and closed it. That should've done the job, right?
Or maybe the shop that the tried different PSUs for me failed to install them correctly?
Or did my old PSU really break my old motherboard? If so, could my new motherboard also be broken now?
Guess I'll also try to unplug the GPU and SATA ports.
 
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Mar 13, 2020
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I just noticed there is a buzzing sound from the PSU for half a second when turning off the PSU, not sure if that's normal.
Also, the PSU fan only spins up when connected to the EVGA detection tool instead of a motherboard. When it's not connected to that tool, the only response is the buzzing sound when turning it off.
 
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Eximo

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Ambassador
PSU fans on most recent models only spin when a specific temperature is reached. I'm so no load conditions are set up so that the fan spins then, just so you know it works.

Unplug everything is my only advice, install one thing at a time. AMD is still using ZIF (Zero Insertion Force) sockets, as long as you lifted the arm and the CPU dropped in, in the right orientation, and then dropped the arm again, that is the entire process.

I would have to hear this buzzing, I suppose. Some power supplies have relays in them that can make rapid clicking sounds when they shut off. But actual electrical buzz would be something else.
 
Mar 13, 2020
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Reassembling everything did the trick. I think the problem with the new motherboard was that I used the adapter for the front panel cable because the manual said that I needed that for non-Intel stuff.
It turns out my PSU is still working fine and most likely my old motherboard suddenly broke (or my CPU, but I'm pretty sure my motherboard would give me some sort of signal if that were the case). I wonder how much I can sell a used 6700k for...
Anyway, thank you very much for the help Eximo! :giggle:
 

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