Question Is my new PC okay?

Feb 4, 2020
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Greetings all

I have purchased a new gaming setup which is already PRE built by a trusted seller which I have bought from in the past, i would like some advice in terms of whether this system is worth the money and whether there is any bottlenecking or possible flaws in this system:

Intel Core i5 7500 3.4ghz (never overclocked or messed with)

MSI GTX 1080 8GB VRAM
Gigabyte Motherboard (no other info)
16GB DDR4 3000MhZ RAM
HyperX CPU cooler
250GB Samsung EVO SSD
2TB HDD
2 INTERNAL FANS
EVGA 450W PSU

I want to play most modern titles at 1080p or possibly 1440p using a 60hz or 144hz monitor

Haven't yet tested as been working 12 hour shifts so will get round to doing so

Please leave your thoughts and feedback

I would appreciate constructive feedback
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
Are these used parts? That makes a huge difference. You say it's a "new" gaming setup, but then refer to the 7500 as never having been overclocked, which suggests that it's used. That's a very big deal.

$800 if these are new parts is a not particularly good, not particularly bad deal. The Skylake/Kaby Lake era i5s have aged extremely poorly as core count usage has swamped an unimpressive four core/four thread configuration. The cooler is extremely basic and not really needed on a locked CPU and the 1080 is dated. You left out specifics about the PSU, but if this is one of the Bronze-rated EVGA 450s, then it's a mediocre, entry-level PSU and a poor choice with a GPU that can instantly demand 200W. If this comes with a legitimate copy of Windows (sourced from Microsoft or an authorized reseller, not a $30 gray market money laundering dump), it's not an awful deal, but it's not a great use of $800.

If these are used parts, it's a pretty bad deal. Because now you're paying for all the additional risk as well without factory warranties, which have a great deal of value. If this is an $800 build with used parts, then it ought to be something like a $1200 type of build when new. This would be an extremely inefficient use of $1200.

In the end, though, it comes down to whether you're happy with it or not. I'd build a very different gaming PC for $800, using a Ryzen 5, waiting for a GTX 3060, etc. But I'm not you.
 
Feb 4, 2020
26
2
35
0
Are these used parts? That makes a huge difference. You say it's a "new" gaming setup, but then refer to the 7500 as never having been overclocked, which suggests that it's used. That's a very big deal.

$800 if these are new parts is a not particularly good, not particularly bad deal. The Skylake/Kaby Lake era i5s have aged extremely poorly as core count usage has swamped an unimpressive four core/four thread configuration. The cooler is extremely basic and not really needed on a locked CPU and the 1080 is dated. You left out specifics about the PSU, but if this is one of the Bronze-rated EVGA 450s, then it's a mediocre, entry-level PSU and a poor choice with a GPU that can instantly demand 200W. If this comes with a legitimate copy of Windows (sourced from Microsoft or an authorized reseller, not a $30 gray market money laundering dump), it's not an awful deal, but it's not a great use of $800.

If these are used parts, it's a pretty bad deal. Because now you're paying for all the additional risk as well without factory warranties, which have a great deal of value. If this is an $800 build with used parts, then it ought to be something like a $1200 type of build when new. This would be an extremely inefficient use of $1200.

In the end, though, it comes down to whether you're happy with it or not. I'd build a very different gaming PC for $800, using a Ryzen 5, waiting for a GTX 3060, etc. But I'm not you.

Just to add on that I was told that this pc was newly built however I am not entirely sure how it was treated or how old the parts truly are

I have an option to return it for a full refund within 14 days and I am still well within in the 14 day limit to return it

As stated I've been working long hours and haven't had a chance to try it yet but i don't think I will

You mentioned that the entry level bronze EVGA PSUs are garbage and I'm afraid that's exactly what the machine is fitted with, its an EVGA 450W Bronze power supply

So in essence this build is not worth 800 dollars and I am better off building a gaming computer myself using the Ryzen series cpus with an AM4 mobo.

Thanks for the input fellas, you're saving me big bucks.
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
Just to add on that I was told that this pc was newly built however I am not entirlwy sure how it was treated or how old the parts truly are

I have an option to return it for a full refund within 14 days and I am still well within in the 14 day limit to return it

As stated I've been working long hours and haven't had a chance to try it yet but i don't think I will

You mentioned that the entry level bronze EVGA PSUs are garbage and I'm afraid that's exactly what the machine is fitted with, its an EVGA 450W Bronze power supply

So in essence this build is not worth 800 dollars and I am better off building a gaming computer myself using the Ryzen series cpus with an AM4 mobo.

Thanks for the input fellas, you're saving me big bucks.
As I said, it really comes down to whether new or used. It's a very big deal! Here's an example.

If I buy an new, unused GTX 1080 from a retailer, I get three years of warranty. I've used this plenty in my life, most recently when a fan on a GTX 1070 stopped working after two years and EVGA replaced the entire GPU with a new GTX 1070 Ti for free.

A used GPU, my experience would be different. If the GTX 1080 was already two years old when I purchased it, I'd only have a one-year warranty. And that's if the manufacturer honors a warranty to anyone but the original purchaser and they don't all do so.

With new parts you're protected. But if they were used parts, you could be out of luck if something went belly-up after a year.
 
Reactions: ImranUl-Haq
Feb 4, 2020
26
2
35
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As I said, it really comes down to whether new or used. It's a very big deal! Here's an example.

If I buy an new, unused GTX 1080 from a retailer, I get three years of warranty. I've used this plenty in my life, most recently when a fan on a GTX 1070 stopped working after two years and EVGA replaced the entire GPU with a new GTX 1070 Ti for free.

A used GPU, my experience would be different. If the GTX 1080 was already two years old when I purchased it, I'd only have a one-year warranty. And that's if the manufacturer honors a warranty to anyone but the original purchaser and they don't all do so.

With new parts you're protected. But if they were used parts, you could be out of luck if something went belly-up after a year.
What's your best advice for me? Should I return it and get my money back and reinvest in a new setup with new parts or should I risk keeping the system and upgrading the PSU?
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
What's your best advice for me? Should I return it and get my money back and reinvest in a new setup with new parts or should I risk keeping the system and upgrading the PSU?
I would personally return the PC. If these are used parts, this wasn't a good deal. If these are new parts, you can make choices that are less likely to hamstring you long-term.
 
Reactions: ImranUl-Haq
Feb 4, 2020
26
2
35
0
I would personally return the PC. If these are used parts, this wasn't a good deal. If these are new parts, you can make choices that are less likely to hamstring you long-term.
I appreciate your advice and feedback, i shall return it at the earliest convenience and reinvest in some new parts.

Thank you ever so much
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
I appreciate your advice and feedback, i shall return it at the earliest convenience and reinvest in some new parts.

Thank you ever so much
I'd definitely come back and talk your build when you're assembling it. In just moderators alone, there are more than a thousand years of building experience combined. We'll hopefully get you the best buy for your money!
 
Reactions: ImranUl-Haq

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
I5 7500 was released in mid 2017. Pretty much halted production with the release of the 8th gen cpus. We are now on the 10th generation. At best, if new, that cpu has been sitting around on a shelf for a couple of years.

The 7500 is not able to be overclocked at all, it's a locked cpu, which explains the very low wattage rating of the psu, but that's most likely a W or N series Evga, bottom of the barrel in quality and ability.

Gtx1080 was released in Q1 of 2019, superceded by the 2000 series shortly after, and again by the 3000 series just recently.

Pretty much everything in that build is New Old Stock, stuff they've been trying to get their investment back on. It's not a bad price at all, but its not a pc that's going to be worth anything or be able to keep up with newer titles, even at 1080p, in a few years.

You can get better prices, even with covid, on used equipment from eBay that will put-perform that build.
 

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