[SOLVED] Is my overclocking reasonable?

Jul 6, 2020
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Hi, I decided to overclock my CPU, It's a I5 3570k currently running at 4.7ghz with 1.25v. I'm using Prime95 to stress test it and maximum temp reaches about 66-72 and idle is about 50. Can I keep pushing on this OC or should I stop here?
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
You have a decent motherboard which is quite capable of supporting an overclocked 3570K, as well as the 3770K, which has higher actual power consumption due to Hyper-Threading. As long as you have an adequate Power Supply (PSU) and you don't exceed 1.3 Vcore and 80°C, you shouldn't have any concerns.

Here's our PSU tier list so you know where your PSU ranks in terms of quality.

CT :sol:
 
That is not bad at all and the temps are well within the safe area and your voltage is very good at 1.25v...anything under 1.3v is good and you can go to 1.35v safely anything above is just too much though some say up to 1.4v.

The one thing of concern is your idle temps as 50 degrees C is a bit to high. I would expect somewhere between 30 and 40 degrees C dependant on whether you live in a hot country...but 40 degrees C would be max for idle... what cooler are you using, case etc?
 
Jul 6, 2020
16
1
25
1
That is not bad at all and the temps are well within the safe area and your voltage is very good at 1.25v...anything under 1.3v is good and you can go to 1.35v safely anything above is just too much though some say up to 1.4v.

The one thing of concern is your idle temps as 50 degrees C is a bit to high. I would expect somewhere between 30 and 40 degrees C dependant on whether you live in a hot country...but 40 degrees C would be max for idle... what cooler are you using, case etc?
I cleaned my cpu fan after I read your text, it's now down at minimum 32 and maximum 39! I'm using a corsair 12v dc 0.24 brushless fan
But even if my CPU can handle it, are there not other components that could break?
 
Reactions: vMax

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
NoTraX,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

As vMax has already pointed out, 4.7 at 1.25 shows that you have a good 3570K. But just so our other Forum Members and visiting readers don't become confused about Core voltage, let's take a closer look:

... voltage is very good at 1.25v...anything under 1.3v is good and you can go to 1.35v safely anything above is just too much though some say up to 1.4v ...
vMax,

CPU Degradation has always been a controversial topic among overclockers on a quest to squeeze out another 100MHz. Respectfully, opinions abound; especially when "some say" are somewhat less than well informed, and are simply repeating what "some say".

Since Intel's launch of 14 nanometer processors in 2015, users have become accustomed to seeing Vcore numbers around 1.4 getting tossed around on forums like gorilla poo in a cage. Most who are new to overclocking and lack fundamental knowledge and experience simply jump to the conclusion that the older 22 nanometer microarchitecture tolerates the same Vcore. Not true.

Each Microarchitecture has a “Maximum Recommended Vcore”. For example, it’s important to point out that 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation processors will not tolerate the higher Core voltages of other Microarchitectures.

Here's the Maximum Recommended Vcore per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:


We know that over time, excessive voltage and heat damages electronics, so when using manual Vcore settings in BIOS, excessive Core voltage and Core temperature can cause accelerated "Electromigration". Processors have multiple layers of hundreds of millions of microscopic nanometer scale components. Electromigration erodes fragile circuit pathways and transistor junctions which results in the degradation of overclock stability, and thus performance.

Although your initial overclock may be stable, degradation doesn't appear until later, when increasingly frequent blue-screen crashes indicate a progressive loss of stability. The more excessive the levels of voltage and heat and the longer they're sustained determines how long until transistor degradation destabilizes your overclock. Decreasing overclock and Vcore may temporarily restore stability and slow the rate of degradation. Extreme overvolting can cause degradation in minutes, but a sensible overclock remains stable for years.

Each Microarchitecture also has a "Degradation Curve". As a rule, CPUs are more susceptible to electromigration and degradation with each Die-shrink. However, the exception to the rule is Intel's 14 nanometer Microarchitecture, where advances in FinFET transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

Here's how the Degradation Curves correspond to Maximum Recommended Vcore for 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation, which differs from 14 nanometer 5th through 10th Generation:


Degradation Curves are relative to the term “Vt (Voltage threshold) Shift” which is expressed in millivolts (mv). Users can not monitor Vt Shift. With respect to overclocking and overvolting, Vt Shift basically represents the potential for permanent loss of normal transistor performance. Excessively high Core voltage drives excessively high Power consumption and Core temperatures, all of which contribute to gradual Vt Shift over time. Core voltages that impose high Vt Shift values are not recommended.

Core voltage multiplied by direct current (amps) equals power (watts) which is driven by workload, that in turn drives Core temperature. Over time, these variables will cause transistor degradation due to Electromigration and Vt Shift.

Here's the variables summarized in a list:

Voltage
Current
Power
Workload
Temperature
Time

The voltages and curves in the above graphs are not merely theoretical techno babble; degradation is a reality, and it does happen when too much Vcore is applied, even if Core temperatures are not excessively high. If you click on the red links above, you can read for yourself the undisputable hard scientific proof behind Electromigration and Vt Shift.

If you look very carefully at the Vt Shift graph and closely examine the blue curve for 22nm processors, you can see that 1.325 volts is about as high as you should go. However, a simple rule of thumb for 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th generation processors is, if you don't want to risk degradation, then don't exceed 1.3 volts or 80°C. I do not recommend that anyone just ignore it, and instead trust their CPU's longevity to what "some say".

Remember to keep overclocking in perspective. For example, the difference between 4.5 GHz and 4.6 GHz is less than 2.3%, which has no noticeable impact on overall system performance. It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.


NoTraX, once again, welcome aboard!

CT:sol:
 
Reactions: vMax
Jul 6, 2020
16
1
25
1
NoTraX,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

As vMax has already pointed out, 4.7 at 1.25 shows that you have a good 3570K. But just so our other Forum Members and visiting readers don't become confused about Core voltage, let's take a closer look:


vMax,

CPU Degradation has always been a controversial topic among overclockers on a quest to squeeze out another 100MHz. Respectfully, opinions abound; especially when "some say" are somewhat less than well informed, and are simply repeating what "some say".

Since Intel's launch of 14 nanometer processors in 2015, users have become accustomed to seeing Vcore numbers around 1.4 getting tossed around on forums like gorilla poo in a cage. Most who are new to overclocking and lack fundamental knowledge and experience simply jump to the conclusion that the older 22 nanometer microarchitecture tolerates the same Vcore. Not true.

Each Microarchitecture has a “Maximum Recommended Vcore”. For example, it’s important to point out that 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation processors will not tolerate the higher Core voltages of other Microarchitectures.

Here's the Maximum Recommended Vcore per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:


We know that over time, excessive voltage and heat damages electronics, so when using manual Vcore settings in BIOS, excessive Core voltage and Core temperature can cause accelerated "Electromigration". Processors have multiple layers of hundreds of millions of microscopic nanometer scale components. Electromigration erodes fragile circuit pathways and transistor junctions which results in the degradation of overclock stability, and thus performance.

Although your initial overclock may be stable, degradation doesn't appear until later, when increasingly frequent blue-screen crashes indicate a progressive loss of stability. The more excessive the levels of voltage and heat and the longer they're sustained determines how long until transistor degradation destabilizes your overclock. Decreasing overclock and Vcore may temporarily restore stability and slow the rate of degradation. Extreme overvolting can cause degradation in minutes, but a sensible overclock remains stable for years.

Each Microarchitecture also has a "Degradation Curve". As a rule, CPUs are more susceptible to electromigration and degradation with each Die-shrink. However, the exception to the rule is Intel's 14 nanometer Microarchitecture, where advances in FinFET transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

Here's how the Degradation Curves correspond to Maximum Recommended Vcore for 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation, which differs from 14 nanometer 5th through 10th Generation:


Degradation Curves are relative to the term “Vt (Voltage threshold) Shift” which is expressed in millivolts (mv). Users can not monitor Vt Shift. With respect to overclocking and overvolting, Vt Shift basically represents the potential for permanent loss of normal transistor performance. Excessively high Core voltage drives excessively high Power consumption and Core temperatures, all of which contribute to gradual Vt Shift over time. Core voltages that impose high Vt Shift values are not recommended.

Core voltage multiplied by direct current (amps) equals power (watts) which is driven by workload, that in turn drives Core temperature. Over time, these variables will cause transistor degradation due to Electromigration and Vt Shift.

Here's the variables summarized in a list:

Voltage
Current
Power
Workload
Temperature
Time

The voltages and curves in the above graphs are not merely theoretical techno babble; degradation is a reality, and it does happen when too much Vcore is applied, even if Core temperatures are not excessively high. If you click on the red links above, you can read for yourself the undisputable hard scientific proof behind Electromigration and Vt Shift.

If you look very carefully at the Vt Shift graph and closely examine the blue curve for 22nm processors, you can see that 1.325 volts is about as high as you should go. However, a simple rule of thumb for 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th generation processors is, if you don't want to risk degradation, then don't exceed 1.3 volts or 80°C. I do not recommend that anyone just ignore it, and instead trust their CPU's longevity to what "some say".

Remember to keep overclocking in perspective. For example, the difference between 4.5 GHz and 4.6 GHz is less than 2.3%, which has no noticeable impact on overall system performance. It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.


NoTraX, once again, welcome aboard!

CT:sol:
Okay I think I understand, so basically I should stay below 1.3v and 80 celsius to be on the safe side.
But when overclocking the CPU are there other components which could break? Like the mobo? and if so how do I check how much mine could handle, As I wish to go beyond 4.7. My mobo is Asus P8Z77-V LX2
 
Jul 6, 2020
16
1
25
1
You have a decent motherboard which is quite capable of supporting an overclocked 3570K, as well as the 3770K, which has higher actual power consumption due to Hyper-Threading. As long as you have an adequate Power Supply (PSU) and you don't exceed 1.3 Vcore and 80°C, you shouldn't have any concerns.

Here's our PSU tier list so you know where your PSU ranks in terms of quality.

CT :sol:
I tried to go to 4.8ghz but there's no way at a maximum 1.3v, so I'll just stay here, thanks alot
 

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