is my pc build bottle necked or bad?

Oct 4, 2018
29
1
35
0
im building my first pc and i posted a forum page for if its all compatable. when the thread was done i showed my friend and he said it was bottle necked and dont know if it is
the first forum page :http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-3818347/building-dont-compatable.html
my parts that got picked: CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor (€157.99 @ Mindfactory)
Motherboard: Gigabyte - B450M DS3H Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard (€75.85 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Memory: Patriot - Viper 4 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (€135.89 @ Mindfactory)
Storage: Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (€78.98 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB DUKE Video Card (€340.31 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Case: Thermaltake - View 22 Tempered Glass Edition ATX Mid Tower Case (€58.90 @ Amazon Deutschland)
Power Supply: Corsair - Vengeance 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply (€62.07 @ Amazon Deutschland)
 
Their never been a PC built without a bottleneck and never will be. All it refers to is the slowest part doing the task at hand and can change to a different part doing a different task.

Their nothing wrong with your build!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sounds like your friend has little to no knowledge of how things work.
 
Their never been a PC built without a bottleneck and never will be. All it refers to is the slowest part doing the task at hand and can change to a different part doing a different task.

Their nothing wrong with your build!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sounds like your friend has little to no knowledge of how things work.
 

prince_xaine

Commendable
Feb 3, 2018
949
20
1,465
116
So many people use the word 'bottlenecked' incorrectly. As a PC enthusiast, it's disgusting, and somewhat annoying. A bottleneck is what happens when a part is slowed down by something else doing the same task, for example, if you send a file from one SSD to another, it will be transferred at the slowest drive's speed. Or when a task maxes out a component. A CPU and GPU do entirely different tasks when gaming, so they will NOT bottleneck each other, but they will be bottlenecked by the task they are doing.

Ex: if you are playing a game that is too much for your GPU, but your CPU still has some headroom, then turning down the settings would equal this out, and you could use a better GPU for better framerates. [Most Common]

Ex: If you are playing a game that is too much for your CPU, but your GPU still has some headroom, turning UP the settings should also equal this out a bit, which would say you would need a better CPU for better framerates.

Just because you are playing GTA V and your CPU is maxed out getting low framerates, doesn't mean your GPU is operating any slower, it isn't. It just means your CPU is being bottlenecked by GTA V and needs to be upgraded to play the game easier.

So to answer your question, no it's not bottlenecked, even a dual core CPU wouldn't bottleneck a 1080 Ti. Your dual core would be bottlenecked in every modern game you try, but the GPU would still be able to handle ultra settings. A Ryzen 5 2600 is a great processor and you shouldn't have any issues.

Most people start upgrading their components when the bottleneck becomes too much, for example, someone who owns a 1080 Ti would upgrade when they could no longer play on max settings or the highest current resolution.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts