[SOLVED] Is my pc decent for video editing and rendering ?

jamies99

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Oct 6, 2015
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Hi i recently acquired a 4 year old hand me down pc from a relative the spec is a follows :
intel i7- 4770 3.40 ghz 24gb geforce gtx 660 asus h87-pro main board i would like to know if the pc is good enough for fast editing and rendering of videos or do i need to upgrade the parts

I would also like to ask if editing and rendering in ssd vs hdd affect speed of the process

thanks in advance all
 
Last edited:

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
The Haswell platform that PC uses is obsolete and there are no upgrade paths for it. Only upgrade would be new CPU-MoBo-RAM combo which is essentially a new PC.

As far as video editing and render goes, it can do them. Though, the question is what are you considering "fast"? If you edit/render 1080p then due to the pixel count alone, it will be much faster than 4K video edit/render. Video length is another factor since the longer the video - the more time it takes to render. Also, what contributes to the render time as well is if you use CPU or GPU to do that. CPU render is inherently slower than GPU render but CPU render is far more precise. Usually, the initial render is made by GPU (due to fast render speeds) while final render is made with CPU (due to precise aka error free result).

SSD vs HDD does play a role since average SSD can be up to 10 times faster regarding write and read speeds than average HDD. It's best to keep your render project on SSD and when it's finished, move the video to HDD for storage.
 
Reactions: jamies99

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
The Haswell platform that PC uses is obsolete and there are no upgrade paths for it. Only upgrade would be new CPU-MoBo-RAM combo which is essentially a new PC.

As far as video editing and render goes, it can do them. Though, the question is what are you considering "fast"? If you edit/render 1080p then due to the pixel count alone, it will be much faster than 4K video edit/render. Video length is another factor since the longer the video - the more time it takes to render. Also, what contributes to the render time as well is if you use CPU or GPU to do that. CPU render is inherently slower than GPU render but CPU render is far more precise. Usually, the initial render is made by GPU (due to fast render speeds) while final render is made with CPU (due to precise aka error free result).

SSD vs HDD does play a role since average SSD can be up to 10 times faster regarding write and read speeds than average HDD. It's best to keep your render project on SSD and when it's finished, move the video to HDD for storage.
 
Reactions: jamies99

jamies99

Reputable
Oct 6, 2015
34
1
4,535
0
The Haswell platform that PC uses is obsolete and there are no upgrade paths for it. Only upgrade would be new CPU-MoBo-RAM combo which is essentially a new PC.

As far as video editing and render goes, it can do them. Though, the question is what are you considering "fast"? If you edit/render 1080p then due to the pixel count alone, it will be much faster than 4K video edit/render. Video length is another factor since the longer the video - the more time it takes to render. Also, what contributes to the render time as well is if you use CPU or GPU to do that. CPU render is inherently slower than GPU render but CPU render is far more precise. Usually, the initial render is made by GPU (due to fast render speeds) while final render is made with CPU (due to precise aka error free result).

SSD vs HDD does play a role since average SSD can be up to 10 times faster regarding write and read speeds than average HDD. It's best to keep your render project on SSD and when it's finished, move the video to HDD for storage.
the question is what are you considering "fast" = faster overall workflow

base on your statement should i upgrade to a new GPU which would make the pc render videos faster ? editing 1080p videos
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
Better GPU does help but only when the software that you use supports GPU render as well. Some do but not all. So, check the program you use first and if it only supports CPU render, you're left with either changing the video edit/render program or going with new CPU-MoBo-RAM combo.
 

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