Is my PC good?

chris4super_dawg

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Jan 8, 2018
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Is my PC Good for gaming and will last a while (3-4 years)? and what should i upgrade?

Specs:

GTX 1050ti
AMD fx 8320 eight core processor
16gb ram
450w
4TB
120SSD
Motherboard: Gigabyte 78LMT-Usb3
 

mazboy

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The fact is that most recommendations for gaming builds these days start at Ryzen5s or i5-7or8xxx because it's the newest and shiniest, parts are easy to get and are reasonably priced (and we all always want new/better/shiny...even if we never get close to the limits of those builds...). There are people still gaming on ancient i5/i7-2/3xxk's with great success (and darned if DDR3 RAM isn't (relatively) cheap!). If you like what you have, and it games well with what you play, incremental updates will work just fine.

The next big movement is going to be into normalizing 4k displays, so I think the next big thing (NBT) is going to be bigger/better/faster GPUs on motherboards with really, really fast buss speeds...and that's a jump that's going to cost a lot of money in new parts...
 

mazboy

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You have a nice middle-of-the-road machine with plenty of RAM that's going to need a bigger boot C:\ SSD sooner than the whole rig becomes obsolete. The price on SSDs is going to start to come down in the next few months, so you might look for a decent price on a 512GB Samsung 850 Evo SATA SSD, a reasonable compromise between speed, price and size.
 

chris4super_dawg

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Jan 8, 2018
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thanks ill get on that people say the 8 core processor is bad for gaming but i dont have any problems and feel i wasted my money on this processor but it seems good i dont get the reason for that i understand benchmarking and more but is it good? like if would u recomend it to a friend? also is my graphics good for most modern games i can run ark on High same for gta with good fps
 

mazboy

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Dec 28, 2017
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The fact is that most recommendations for gaming builds these days start at Ryzen5s or i5-7or8xxx because it's the newest and shiniest, parts are easy to get and are reasonably priced (and we all always want new/better/shiny...even if we never get close to the limits of those builds...). There are people still gaming on ancient i5/i7-2/3xxk's with great success (and darned if DDR3 RAM isn't (relatively) cheap!). If you like what you have, and it games well with what you play, incremental updates will work just fine.

The next big movement is going to be into normalizing 4k displays, so I think the next big thing (NBT) is going to be bigger/better/faster GPUs on motherboards with really, really fast buss speeds...and that's a jump that's going to cost a lot of money in new parts...
 

chris4super_dawg

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Jan 8, 2018
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your right cause im doing fine no need to upgrade anything really except that ssd and maybe my motherboard for newer games thanks u helped open my eyes a bit. do u think itll be a good idea to add lioquid cooling to the amd fx 8320?
 

mazboy

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Modern AIO liquid cooling is a godsend!! I use it because it's reasonably priced (depending on the TDP you're dealing with), keeps clutter to a minimum, and doesn't weigh down the motherboard with monstrous heavy air coolers that block RAM slots or PCIe slots or are just big general pains.
 

chris4super_dawg

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Jan 8, 2018
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The FX8xxx can still play games ok but in any game where single core performance matters they really suffer as its cores are very weak by todays standards. It all depends on the game. BF1 is a game that can use all 8 cores so is best case, now you will seen in this benchmark the fps are completely acceptable but even the FX8370 is beaten by a 3 generation old i3


If all parts were new you could have built much better for that budget. The other issue you have is the CPU socket (FM3+) and DDR3 are dead ends, there are literally no upgrade paths without having to change cpu/motherboard/RAM.
 
Don't go AIO cooler. Your motherboard is known to struggle with 125w CPU's, by how much depends on which version you have, they are up to 6.0. The cpu VRM's are known to overheat. The stock cooler with top down airflow pushes air down over the cpu and out over the surrounding components which includes the VRM's. An AIO removes all this airflow from the surrounding components. Any cooler you choose for that motherboard needs to be a top down airflow design to maximise cooling for the VRM's.
 

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