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Question Is my PSU powerful enough?

May 17, 2019
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Hi.
I just bought a used Asus GTX 1080Ti on Ebay because I am planning to build a new computer soon. I would like to test it in my current computer (since Ebay's buyer protection is only valid for 30 days) and I am not sure if my PSU is powerful enough.
My current power supply has 450W and the specs of my current pc are:
Mainboard: ASRock H87 Pro4
CPU: Intel I5-4570
8GB DDR3 RAM
1TB HDD
DVD Drive (not sure if that matters)
GPU: GTX 970 Palit Jetstream

Is it safe to swap the GTX 970 for the GTX 1080ti for a quick test just to see if the new gpu is working?

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
May 17, 2019
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450W is cutting it a little close.
As I said, I'm planning on building a new pc soon. I'm basically just waiting for the release of AMDs Ryzen 3000 series since that might have an impact on the cpu that I choose. What if I already bought a new, more powerful PSU for my future pc and use that along with the 1080ti for a quick test in my old pc?
 

Zephyl

Commendable
Mar 13, 2017
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As I said, I'm planning on building a new pc soon. I'm basically just waiting for the release of AMDs Ryzen 3000 series since that might have an impact on the cpu that I choose. What if I already bought a new, more powerful PSU for my future pc and use that along with the 1080ti for a quick test in my old pc?
I mean, it would work if it was 500W+, better if it were 600W+.
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
What is the exact PSU? Just as with cars, the brand is as important as the claimed output. At every wattage level, there are very good PSUs and PSUs literally not worth the cardboard box they're shipped in. You may have an excellent or very good PSU. You may have an OK one that is probably safe to muddle by with for a short period. You may have a bad one that shouldn't be used with this GPU. Or you may have one so abysmal that you need to arrange to have it recycled so that nobody ever tries to use it.
 
May 17, 2019
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I run an EVGA SuperNova G3 550w power supply and I thought that was cutting it close. You could get a watt-meter and see how close the power draw comes. Have you tried it yet? If so do you hear the PSU fan kick on?
No, I haven't tried anything yet.

What is the exact PSU? Just as with cars, the brand is as important as the claimed output. At every wattage level, there are very good PSUs and PSUs literally not worth the cardboard box they're shipped in. You may have an excellent or very good PSU. You may have an OK one that is probably safe to muddle by with for a short period. You may have a bad one that shouldn't be used with this GPU. Or you may have one so abysmal that you need to arrange to have it recycled so that nobody ever tries to use it.
I just checked and it's a BeQuiet System Power 7 450W.
 

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
You're in a better scenario than a lot of people with mystery PSUs! It's an average power supply, but not one I'd use long-term with an expensive card with no warranty on the card. This PSU has 432W on the +12V rail and this card can hit 250W, which means you'll be really stressing out this PSU if you're at load. And if this is one of the more aggressively factory-overclocked 1080 Tis, even more. You'll probably be fine for the time being, but I'd make sure I'm not overclocking anything and if this card is one of the more aggressively clocked, I might even consider underclocking if I do a lot of heavy gaming.
 
May 17, 2019
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I would wait until you get a better psu. Peak my GTX 1080 ti duke hits 250w. The bigger issue is going to be your existing hardware will also severely limit the gtx 1080 ti's full potential. For multiple reasons you should wait for your 3rd gen ryzen system.
I know that the rest of my system is far from optimal for the 1080ti, I would just like to test if it is working because I have only 30 days to get my money back if it does not. So the best thing would be to buy a new power supply, stick the new power supply and the 1080ti in my old pc, test if the gpu works and then put the old power supply and the gtx 970 back into the old pc and wait until I buy the rest of the components for my new pc, right?
 
Reactions: King_V

DSzymborski

Glorious
Moderator
I know that the rest of my system is far from optimal for the 1080ti, I would just like to test if it is working because I have only 30 days to get my money back if it does not. So the best thing would be to buy a new power supply, stick the new power supply and the 1080ti in my old pc, test if the gpu works and then put the old power supply and the gtx 970 back into the old pc and wait until I buy the rest of the components for my new pc, right?
It's what I would do. Since you're buying a new power supply anyway and the 1080 Ti is one of the main reasons to get a better power supply, there's no reason not to. A good PSU can last multiple generations of your PC if you do full new builds.
 
Reactions: King_V
I know that the rest of my system is far from optimal for the 1080ti, I would just like to test if it is working because I have only 30 days to get my money back if it does not. So the best thing would be to buy a new power supply, stick the new power supply and the 1080ti in my old pc, test if the gpu works and then put the old power supply and the gtx 970 back into the old pc and wait until I buy the rest of the components for my new pc, right?
Do you know someone with a better system? I was in your exact situation. I had purchased a 1080ti used on eBay and I didn't think my 550w PSU would be adequate. Sure you could install your existing graphics card into your existing build to see if it still works (Basic function), but you won't be able to stress it enough to adequately test max performance. I chose to install mine into my Dads system that had an i7 4790k and a 850w power supply which was a known good system. This allowed me to adequately test the following:
GPU Frequency Boosts
Thermals
Peak load
None of which can be adequately tested on an inadequate system.
 
May 17, 2019
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Do you know someone with a better system? I was in your exact situation. I had purchased a 1080ti used on eBay and I didn't think my 550w PSU would be adequate. Sure you could install your existing graphics card into your existing build to see if it still works (Basic function), but you won't be able to stress it enough to adequately test max performance. I chose to install mine into my Dads system that had an i7 4790k and a 850w power supply which was a known good system. This allowed me to adequately test the following:
GPU Frequency Boosts
Thermals
Peak load
None of which can be adequately tested on an inadequate system.
Unfortunately, no. I think I'll have to stick with testing it for basic functionality in my existing system with a new power supply.

What kind of wattage would you recommend for a new power supply if I want to be on the safe side for a few years? Is something like 650W enough?
 
Nov 8, 2018
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I have a Silverstone Strider 450W Modular SFX 80+ Gold Power Supply. Its an ITX small factor supply. Had it since 2011. Since then its run a GTX 660, GTX970, GTX1070 and now my latest GTX1080 with no issues at all also able to overclock the CPU and GPU together (a 2500K/ 3570K/ 3770S and now 8700). Obviously the last two CPUS are not overclockable so can't attest to that. But the GTX1080 overclocks to +150 and I had the 3570K running at 4.4. I have a AIO CPU cooler with one fan, 2 case fans and 2 SSDs. I've never actually measured the total system power draw...RTX 2070 or the new Radeon Navi will be next I think I'd be pushing my luck with a Radeon VII or Vega 64, I did consider Vega 56 though. I ruled out the GTX1080ti because of the same reason (as well as the price/ performance versus a used GTX1080 didn't make sense). I think a GTX1080ti might be pushing it! I use it for work and games about 50/50 split. So some actual hard evidence. Hope this helps, Si
 
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