Is Premiere capture lossless?

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When we use Premiere to capture video from a MiniDV tape, is the
created avi file lossless and the best video quality possible?
If so, I want to back up some of my MiniDV tapes through this
method to hard drives or DVD-R. Then I can reuse the tapes for
recording again.
 
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"lemonade" <lemonade@iceshop.com> wrote in message
news:qrld90lv99eccckl910gueat66iircdftm@4ax.com...
> When we use Premiere to capture video from a MiniDV tape, is the
> created avi file lossless and the best video quality possible?


if you captured via firewire DV then yes. With respect tot the data on the
tape it will be a 1:1 lossless transfer of data. The DV format itself is
5:1 compression but NO data is lost when transferring that thru firewire to
your hard disk.


> If so, I want to back up some of my MiniDV tapes through this
> method to hard drives or DVD-R. Then I can reuse the tapes for
> recording again.


hmm... tapes are cheap.
 
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On Tue, 04 May 2004 00:14:31 GMT, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com>
wrote:

>
>"lemonade" <lemonade@iceshop.com> wrote in message
>news:qrld90lv99eccckl910gueat66iircdftm@4ax.com...
>> When we use Premiere to capture video from a MiniDV tape, is the
>> created avi file lossless and the best video quality possible?
>
>
>if you captured via firewire DV then yes. With respect tot the data on the
>tape it will be a 1:1 lossless transfer of data. The DV format itself is
>5:1 compression but NO data is lost when transferring that thru firewire to
>your hard disk.
>
Are codecs involved during the transfer? The codec should be a
lossless one, right? Is it possible for me to find out what
codec is used by Premiere?
 
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"lemonade" wrote ...
> Are codecs involved during the transfer?

Codecs are virtually ALWAYS involved during any transfer.

> The codec should be a lossless one, right?

The DV codecs in use are almost certainly "lossless" They
merely capture the DV bitstreeam and shove it into an AVI file,
unchanged. The original DV bitstream was already compressed
5:1 by the camcorder and no further compression is performed
unless you transcode into MPEG or something.

> Is it possible for me to find out what codec is used by Premiere?

1) It likely depends on the OS you are running (and maybe the
hardware you are using?) There is probably a very common DV
codec that comes with the operating system (or with the Firewire
port if an old OS and an aftermarket Firewire port).

2) It doesn't really matter as it is almost certainly lossless and of
no further concern. (Unless you are doing something very unusual
you haven't mentioned.)
 

Joe

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>
> hmm... tapes are cheap.


1 hour dv tape = 13 gigs of video for $3 - $5
3 blank DVDs = 14.1 gigs of storage for $2 - $6
80gig hard drive for $60 = .75 per gig * 13gigs = $9.75

not only are tapes cheap, but it's a lot less hassle than breaking up a one
hour video and putting it on 3 dvds
 
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"Joe" <res04854@gte.net> wrote ...
> >
> > hmm... tapes are cheap.
>
>
> 1 hour dv tape = 13 gigs of video for $3 - $5
> 3 blank DVDs = 14.1 gigs of storage for $2 - $6
> 80gig hard drive for $60 = .75 per gig * 13gigs = $9.75
>
> not only are tapes cheap, but it's a lot less hassle than breaking up a
one
> hour video and putting it on 3 dvds

Bravo! People need reminding of this more often!

Now if I could only record at DV speed on my DVCAM
VCR (DSR-20). Or get 90-minute DV tapes?
 
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excisely!

n
"Joe" <res04854@gte.net> wrote in message
news:j4Dlc.147890$L31.44228@nwrddc01.gnilink.net...
> >
> > hmm... tapes are cheap.
>
>
> 1 hour dv tape = 13 gigs of video for $3 - $5
> 3 blank DVDs = 14.1 gigs of storage for $2 - $6
> 80gig hard drive for $60 = .75 per gig * 13gigs = $9.75
>
> not only are tapes cheap, but it's a lot less hassle than breaking up a
one
> hour video and putting it on 3 dvds
>
>
 
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lemonade <lemonade@iceshop.com> wrote:

>On Tue, 04 May 2004 00:14:31 GMT, "nappy" <no_spam_@sorry.com>
>wrote:
>
>>
>>"lemonade" <lemonade@iceshop.com> wrote in message
>>news:qrld90lv99eccckl910gueat66iircdftm@4ax.com...
>>> When we use Premiere to capture video from a MiniDV tape, is the
>>> created avi file lossless and the best video quality possible?
>>
>>
>>if you captured via firewire DV then yes. With respect tot the data on the
>>tape it will be a 1:1 lossless transfer of data. The DV format itself is
>>5:1 compression but NO data is lost when transferring that thru firewire to
>>your hard disk.
>>
>Are codecs involved during the transfer? The codec should be a
>lossless one, right? Is it possible for me to find out what
>codec is used by Premiere?

The transfer from the MiniDV device to the computer is a data
transfer, it's not a transcode operation, so therefore it is a
lossless transfer. DV codec is however a lossy codec but _not_ in the
transfer process, only when you need to recode it. So if you do a cuts
only edit, you will not lose any quality as no recoding is done. If
you add effects, transitions, etc you will start to introduce loss.
It's pretty minimal though.

Cheers


--
Kevin Gleeson
Blue Rocket Productions
www.blue-rocket.com.au
www.hoota-snoz.com
 
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> 1 hour dv tape = 13 gigs of video for $3 - $5
> 3 blank DVDs = 14.1 gigs of storage for $2 - $6
> 80gig hard drive for $60 = .75 per gig * 13gigs = $9.75

Yeah, but you usually compress to MPEG2 when storing on DVD therefore...

1 dv tape = 1 hour
3 dvds = 6 hours (at least)
 
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"Damien Evans" <guest@anon.com> wrote in message
news:c77jls$iq8u$1@ID-110394.news.uni-berlin.de...

> > 1 hour dv tape = 13 gigs of video for $3 - $5
> > 3 blank DVDs = 14.1 gigs of storage for $2 - $6
> > 80gig hard drive for $60 = .75 per gig * 13gigs = $9.75

> Yeah, but you usually compress to MPEG2 when storing on DVD therefore...
>
> 1 dv tape = 1 hour
> 3 dvds = 6 hours (at least)

Uh.....,
1 DV tape = 1 hour of 5:1 compressed video info
(SP-mode, 60-minute tape).
3 DVDs = 1 hour of DV video-data (as above) or
3 hours of further-compressed playable-video (the
quality-loss is generally visible but acceptable at this
level of compression, but at double the playing time,
it is close to unacceptable unless the original image
has little fine detail and/or it has almost no image
motion...). And, the DV tape, if properly stored,
will likely remain playable over a longer period than
it would be with either of the other two storage methods...
--
David Ruether
rpn1@cornell.edu
http://www.ferrario.com/ruether
 
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> > 1 hour dv tape = 13 gigs of video for $3 - $5
> > 3 blank DVDs = 14.1 gigs of storage for $2 - $6
> > 80gig hard drive for $60 = .75 per gig * 13gigs = $9.75

"Damien Evans" wrote ...
> Yeah, but you usually compress to MPEG2 when storing
> on DVD therefore...
> 1 dv tape = 1 hour
> 3 dvds = 6 hours (at least)

You are confusing making a DVD-playable disk (MPEGx)
with using a DVD disk for storage of data (which just happens
to be DV-AVI files). You wouldn't want to further compress
DV into MPEG if you had any intent of editing it into future
productions.
 

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