[SOLVED] Is processor still good and will it affect my laptop if not?

May 21, 2020
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Hello people. I'm a total newbie to these things, I'm wondering if I could use a processor from a laptop that haven't been used for years.

So here the case. I have an old laptop with a core i7 processor that I have stopped using for approximately 4-5 years, 'cause the screen was broken and the graphics card apparently also had a problem and I could not use it well by connecting it to a TV screen either via RGB or HDMI cable. The laptop that I am using right now has a core i3 and only 4gb ram (I was unable to properly use my music software without using a virtual memory using a USB flash drive). So now I would like to know if I could take the core i7 processor from the laptop that cannot be switched on anymore after 4-5 years (I have tried to charge and switch it on some days ago) and replace the core i3 in my current laptop. How do I know if the core i7 is still good? And if it's not, will it cause any defect to my current laptop if I try to use it on this one?

Thanks for your help.
 

punkncat

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If there is any hope at all of changing out the processor, and including the comment above about soldering, will require a bit of homework on your part.

Look up the exact model of computer you have and see if it was offered with upgrade parts. For instance was yours sold with an i5? and i7? and generally there may have been options for more drive space, SSD, more RAM...
To the point, so IF you machine was offered with the higher line CPU then the next thing would be to dig in to see if both your motherboard and it's attached power supply are actually the same as the other. Many times they will be. IF that is then the case you have opportunity to attempt to locate and replace the CPU with the higher model. If it's soldered in it "can" be changed but needs to be by someone who knows what they are doing.
 
Reactions: //Gianni//

punkncat

Dignified
Ambassador
If there is any hope at all of changing out the processor, and including the comment above about soldering, will require a bit of homework on your part.

Look up the exact model of computer you have and see if it was offered with upgrade parts. For instance was yours sold with an i5? and i7? and generally there may have been options for more drive space, SSD, more RAM...
To the point, so IF you machine was offered with the higher line CPU then the next thing would be to dig in to see if both your motherboard and it's attached power supply are actually the same as the other. Many times they will be. IF that is then the case you have opportunity to attempt to locate and replace the CPU with the higher model. If it's soldered in it "can" be changed but needs to be by someone who knows what they are doing.
 
Reactions: //Gianni//
You can find whole system boards with the higher-end processors i5/i7 processors on them for reasonable prices on Ebay usually. I changed out one in a HP Probook for $100 for the i7u variant...which is far cheaper than buying a totally new computer.

RAM is a pretty easy upgrade as well provided that's not soldered in as some manufactures like to do these days.

RAM + a solid state hard drive to replace a spinny one can make a world of improvement even to an i3.
 

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