[SOLVED] Is Router under Switch considered in the same LAN?

Jan 10, 2020
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I can pull multiple IPs from my modem, I utilize this via a switch connected directly to the modem, since the modem has only one port.
I want to connect a router to also have WI-fi connectivity, but the only way to do it if it's connected to the switch.
How can I set things up so it's on the same LAN and I can use WakeOnLAN, file and device sharing etc?
 
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All you do to make it so all the devices can talk to each other is make the "router" run as a AP. Many routers have that function but if not search how to run a router as AP it is trivial to do.

Having a modem that allows mulitple IP is very rare. You would think there is some limit, Public IP addresses are in limited supply.

Be aware your devices are now directly on the internet. They can be individually seen and attacked. In the more common install where a router is between the modem and all your devices only the router can be seen and it makes attacks much more difficult.
 
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USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Allowed and working are two different things.

The modem talks to one and only one device. A router or a PC.
You need to exchange places - the router and switch.

Unless, of course, your "modem" is actually a router.
Terminology counts.
 
Jan 10, 2020
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Some isps will will allow multiple IPs to be pulled from a single modem.
Yes, that's my case. I have edited my first post to clarify this.
I can pull multiple IPs from my modem, I utilize this via a switch connected directly to the modem, since the modem has only one port.
I want to connect a router to also have WI-fi connectivity, but the only way to do it if it's connected to the switch.
However, in the OPs setup, pc1 and pc2 are on different lans.
Can you also tell me if PC1 and PC3 are same or different LANs? And if there is any setting I can do to my router to join all devices in one LAN?
 

SamirD

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Bill001g is spot on as you can just use your router as an access point, but the security concern is a serious one as most routers bring a lot of protection with nat. Is there any particular reason you want these systems to have a direct IP address?
 

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