Question Is the Intel XEON e3-1270 Still Worth It In 2020?

XxDarkMario20xX

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My answer will be nope, there many CPU out there that are much better now including the new Intel core i5 10 gen CPU there cheap and affordable and some are good budget CPU do not know if you're upgrading or just buying a new CPU or already have a motherboard and such, but if you're willing to upgrade than think about the new 10 gen i5 if you're on budget and yes you might need new motherboard but there might be cheaper ones :)

Intel Core i5 10400, S 1200, Comet Lake, 6 Cores, 12 Threads, 2.9GHz, 4.3GHz Turbo and in uk price its £189.98
 
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Karadjgne

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Depends on what you want and where you are coming from.

If you have a B or H board, and an i3 or i5 then yes, it's a good upgrade, equitable to a 3770/k or 4770/k (depending, you gotta get the right version, v2 is for lga1155, v3 is for lga1150).

If looking to get better performance for games, then maybe. It'll help considerably with multithreaded applications, requiring 5-8 threads like gtaV, but for games with 1-4 threads like CSGO, it'll not be an upgrade over an i3-i5 with similar clock speeds.

But either way, 3rd/4th gen cpus are getting very long in the tooth and newer titles are demanding higher performance cpus, so it's overall usefulness on that old platform will be limited, for a limited time. As far as games go. For an htpc that's just used for running movies etc, it'll be good for as long as it lives, or until the software/OS becomes obsolete and newer versions don't run right.
 
May 22, 2020
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My answer will be nope, there many CPU out there that are much better now including the new Intel core i5 10 gen CPU there cheap and affordable and some are good budget CPU do not know if you're upgrading or just buying a new CPU or already have a motherboard and such, but if you're willing to upgrade than think about the new 10 gen i5 if you're on budget and yes you might need new motherboard but there might be cheaper ones :)

Intel Core i5 10400, S 1200, Comet Lake, 6 Cores, 12 Threads, 2.9GHz, 4.3GHz Turbo and in uk price its £189.98
Ok thank you!
 

Karadjgne

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Nope. Sorta. The Ivy-Bridge cpus have a chance at an extra 400MHz in some turbo settings, so that could bring you upto @ 4.2GHz, which isn't bad at all. But otherwise, they are locked just like all other Intel cpu's without the X or K.
 
May 23, 2020
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Made an account literally for this question alone, it was too relevant to pass up. Just yesterday I finished installing a E3-1290 V2 in an old HP Compaq Elite 8300 SFF desktop. So far I have been extremely impressed with it's performance... for it's age. If you have the funds, I would certainly go with something more modern. Skylake at the minimum IMO, and that's only if you can find a great deal. If you're going to go with something brand new, I would say AMDs offerings right now are hard to beat, especially in the low to mid range. I have absolutely fallen in love with the Ryzen 5 3600, and even some of the Zen 2 Ryzen 3s look pretty impressive.

In short, if you're okay with forgoing some major modern features (Sandy Bridge CPU's like the e3-1270 lack PCIe 3.0, USB 3.0, SATA III, and modern CPU instruction sets, a absolute deal breaker if you ask me) and sticking to programs from around it's release date you should be fine. If you're planning on doing anything outside of that, you should look for a cheaper, newer CPU.
 
Made an account literally for this question alone, it was too relevant to pass up. Just yesterday I finished installing a E3-1290 V2 in an old HP Compaq Elite 8300 SFF desktop. So far I have been extremely impressed with it's performance... for it's age. If you have the funds, I would certainly go with something more modern. Skylake at the minimum IMO, and that's only if you can find a great deal. If you're going to go with something brand new, I would say AMDs offerings right now are hard to beat, especially in the low to mid range. I have absolutely fallen in love with the Ryzen 5 3600, and even some of the Zen 2 Ryzen 3s look pretty impressive.

In short, if you're okay with forgoing some major modern features (Sandy Bridge CPU's like the e3-1270 lack PCIe 3.0, USB 3.0, SATA III, and modern CPU instruction sets, a absolute deal breaker if you ask me) and sticking to programs from around it's release date you should be fine. If you're planning on doing anything outside of that, you should look for a cheaper, newer CPU.
The main factor to me is cost because that translates to value very quickly. If something is cheap enough or free, the value is basically as high as it can get since free is better than paying for anything imo.

Usb 3.0 can be added to almost anything as well as sata 3--all you need is a pcie card. Nothing lost at all even with platforms as old as lga775.
 
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May 22, 2020
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Made an account literally for this question alone, it was too relevant to pass up. Just yesterday I finished installing a E3-1290 V2 in an old HP Compaq Elite 8300 SFF desktop. So far I have been extremely impressed with it's performance... for it's age. If you have the funds, I would certainly go with something more modern. Skylake at the minimum IMO, and that's only if you can find a great deal. If you're going to go with something brand new, I would say AMDs offerings right now are hard to beat, especially in the low to mid range. I have absolutely fallen in love with the Ryzen 5 3600, and even some of the Zen 2 Ryzen 3s look pretty impressive.

In short, if you're okay with forgoing some major modern features (Sandy Bridge CPU's like the e3-1270 lack PCIe 3.0, USB 3.0, SATA III, and modern CPU instruction sets, a absolute deal breaker if you ask me) and sticking to programs from around it's release date you should be fine. If you're planning on doing anything outside of that, you should look for a cheaper, newer CPU.
Thank you so much!
 

Karadjgne

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No.
The main factor to me is cost because that translates to value very quickly. If something is cheap enough or free, the value is basically as high as it can get since free is better than paying for anything imo.

Usb 3.0 can be added to almost anything as well as sata 3--all you need is a pcie card. Nothing lost at all even with platforms as old as lga775.
1. If someone gave you a bag of dog poo for free, it's value doesn't change. It's still a pile of dog poo. Value is based on usefulness not currency alone. A 5¼" floppy drive is as useful as ***'s on a bull, so even if it was free and worked, it's value is nothing to you unless you HAVE a use for it.

2. Sandy-Bridge pcie is 2.0. That's the limits of the cpu and the chipset on the motherboard. You can add a pcie 10.0 card to it, it's speeds and bandwidth will still be limited to pcie 2.0, no way around that. You might have a pcie 3.0 riser/add on card, it'll operate at pcie 2.0 regardless. Same with Sata3, it'll be recognised, maybe, but will only operate upto the Sata limits of the mobo, which on many 775 mobo's was Sata 1.
 

momozmonster

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The main factor to me is cost because that translates to value very quickly. If something is cheap enough or free, the value is basically as high as it can get since free is better than paying for anything imo.

Usb 3.0 can be added to almost anything as well as sata 3--all you need is a pcie card. Nothing lost at all even with platforms as old as lga775.
I like the way you think! I'm in the same boat....
 
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No.

1. If someone gave you a bag of dog poo for free, it's value doesn't change. It's still a pile of dog poo. Value is based on usefulness not currency alone. A 5¼" floppy drive is as useful as ***'s on a bull, so even if it was free and worked, it's value is nothing to you unless you HAVE a use for it.

2. Sandy-Bridge pcie is 2.0. That's the limits of the cpu and the chipset on the motherboard. You can add a pcie 10.0 card to it, it's speeds and bandwidth will still be limited to pcie 2.0, no way around that. You might have a pcie 3.0 riser/add on card, it'll operate at pcie 2.0 regardless. Same with Sata3, it'll be recognised, maybe, but will only operate upto the Sata limits of the mobo, which on many 775 mobo's was Sata 1.
I'm not talking currency, I'm talking usefulness. A pile of dog poo is maybe what someone like a veterinarian researcher wants. A 5.25" floppy drive is gold if what you need to read is on a 5.25" floppy disk. Expecting to find value in getting what you need the very second you need it is dicey to say the least. In fact, it is usually when one pays the most because you actually need it at that point.

You can never go beyond the limits of the architecture, that's correct. But you can put 12Gbps sas pcie cards in whatever you want they will run as fast as the architecture will allow. That doesn't mean the architecture is 'bad' or 'useless' or 'garbage'--it means that it is limited. If you need a nas to saturate a 10Gbps link, pcie lanes, etc would need consideration, but if you're trying to just make an ssd run as fast as it can--who cares it it's 500MB/S or 350MB/s? No one can even truly perceive the difference between 2500MB/S and 500MB/S. Why spend money chasing specs that don't really matter?
 

momozmonster

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Not if the device doesn't even need 2.0 speeds. Remember, the spec only defines the upper bound, not the normal operating speeds.
hopefully i still have your attention.... but the mother board is old Asus M5a97 and I wanted to try New 5700XT ... will the mother board even recognize the card?
 

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