Question Is there a good way I can determine the health of my components?

Dec 4, 2019
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As the title implies, I need a way to figure out if my components are running as they should be. A couple of weeks ago, my PC fell off my desk. This fiasco didn't fit well with the components inside, and now I have reason to believe my CPU is failing (due to some extremely long loading times in Civilization VI along with major lag spikes playing COD MW), along with other parts.
I was already planning on upgrading my PC as it is 3 years old now, but it still has formidable components in it, like the GTX 1060 6GB, and I'd still like to make some money back off of it. Again, though, I can't sell something that doesn't even work properly.
I ran a UserBenchmark and found majority of my components were performing well below average, with my CPU doing the worst at a whopping 11th percentile. It also told me my brand new SSD I bought a couple of weeks prior to the fall was performing at the 19th percentile, which was really strange considering the SSD wouldn't have taken hardly any damage as it is secured in place well, with a sort of "cushioning". Because of this, I'm not really sure whether I'm getting accurate readings or not, and would like a second opinion on it, as I'm hoping to use my current SSD's and HDD with the new PC I'm buying to save the hassle of reinstalling and all :/

Any help is appreciated!
 
Most components (aside from mechanical HDD or a screen) shouldn't be affected by a fall unless it's hard enough to physically crack the circuit boards. How are temperatures and is the interior clean and free of dust?

Also, to gauge the health of the Windows installation, have a look at the task manager. After a clean restart with no other programs running the CPU and drive use should level to near zero and RAM should be steady at no more than a couple of GB.
 
Dec 4, 2019
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Most components (aside from mechanical HDD or a screen) shouldn't be affected by a fall unless it's hard enough to physically crack the circuit boards. How are temperatures and is the interior clean and free of dust?

Also, to gauge the health of the Windows installation, have a look at the task manager. After a clean restart with no other programs running the CPU and drive use should level to near zero and RAM should be steady at no more than a couple of GB.
The temperatures seem to be fine. CPU is ~30C when the PC is idle, and I recalled seeing the GPU at 60C when playing COD MW (which is graphics intense, so not a bad temp I believe). The interior is relatively dust-free, with some minor buildup in some areas. I restarted the PC, closed all programs and was getting ~4% CPU and Disk usage and minuscule GPU usage.

So this all seems like it's doing fine, which is exactly why I'm confused. Because I know that fall did something bad to the PC, as I went from being able to play games smoothly with my friends in Civ VI to taking absurd amounts of time to process each turn, and at one point, it just ended up constantly desyncing from the game. I also started getting this strange movement pattern in FPS games where I'd be, let's say, walking forward and left, holding down [W] and [A]. When I'd let go of the keys, sometimes my character would continue moving in this direction for a small time, no matter what other keys I'd be pressing, and it made it incredibly frustrating to play.

This PC is still very much functional and somewhat worth it, so I really have got to figure out the cause of the problem so I can fix it and sell the thing.

Any other thoughts? Thanks in advance.
 
Nov 1, 2019
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Considering that if any component had even slight damage internally (cracking in the silicon) it wouldn’t function at all as CPUs and GPUs aren’t like a mechanical device where little bits can usually wear or fail but will still function well enough, what I would suggest is taking it apart, clean everything, reseat every component and probably a fresh windows install.
 
Dec 4, 2019
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Considering that if any component had even slight damage internally (cracking in the silicon) it wouldn’t function at all as CPUs and GPUs aren’t like a mechanical device where little bits can usually wear or fail but will still function well enough, what I would suggest is taking it apart, clean everything, reseat every component and probably a fresh windows install.
Yeah, you've definitely got a point with it being physically damaged or not. However, I'm not going to sell the whole PC itself, but rather a couple of the components, and then save some of the rest for my new PC build.

So essentially, I just need to know how each part is holding up, particularly the RAM, Disk Drives and especially the GPU, as I'd like to carry the RAM and Drives over to the new PC and sell the GPU.

So really what I'm trying to ask: Is there some sort of "stress test" or something I can put each individual component under to see how it's holding up?

If not, I'll try what you suggested. Thanks.
 
Something you said about the keys reacting slowly as when you release them and there's a delay makes me wonder about the keyboard. Sometimes a stuck key can cause odd behavior with no apparent explanation. Check the keyboard key by key and re-seat it's USB connector and any other external devices while you're at it.

If that doesn't help, I'd also endorse the above idea to rebuild the PC.
 
Dec 4, 2019
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Something you said about the keys reacting slowly as when you release them and there's a delay makes me wonder about the keyboard. Sometimes a stuck key can cause odd behavior with no apparent explanation. Check the keyboard key by key and re-seat it's USB connector and any other external devices while you're at it.

If that doesn't help, I'd also endorse the above idea to rebuild the PC.
Actually, my keyboard did take damage from the fall. It was acting up an absurd amount for the following week after the fall, constantly disconnecting and reconnecting, sometimes not even turning on at all for hours on end. Some days it would do this nonstop for the whole day, and then the next day? Nothing happens.

So far, I haven't noticed any problems with the keyboard beside the constant disconnection, and it hasn't acted up in 3-4 days now.

Perhaps the movement problems could be caused by the keyboard? But as far as I can tell, I haven't had a single problem typing with it (while it's connected), which lead me to believe it was a faulty CPU. But maybe you're onto something... I am going to replace the keyboard either way as it'll inevitably act up again, which is a shame as it's a BlackWidow Chroma V2, very nice keyboard and expensive too.
 
Actually, my keyboard did take damage from the fall. It was acting up an absurd amount for the following week after the fall, constantly disconnecting and reconnecting, sometimes not even turning on at all for hours on end. Some days it would do this nonstop for the whole day, and then the next day? Nothing happens.

So far, I haven't noticed any problems with the keyboard beside the constant disconnection, and it hasn't acted up in 3-4 days now.

Perhaps the movement problems could be caused by the keyboard? But as far as I can tell, I haven't had a single problem typing with it (while it's connected), which lead me to believe it was a faulty CPU. But maybe you're onto something... I am going to replace the keyboard either way as it'll inevitably act up again, which is a shame as it's a BlackWidow Chroma V2, very nice keyboard and expensive too.
I'd see how the PC runs with a different keyboard if possible
 
Nov 1, 2019
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Yeah, you've definitely got a point with it being physically damaged or not. However, I'm not going to sell the whole PC itself, but rather a couple of the components, and then save some of the rest for my new PC build.

So essentially, I just need to know how each part is holding up, particularly the RAM, Disk Drives and especially the GPU, as I'd like to carry the RAM and Drives over to the new PC and sell the GPU.

So really what I'm trying to ask: Is there some sort of "stress test" or something I can put each individual component under to see how it's holding up?

If not, I'll try what you suggested. Thanks.
As far as stress testing goes you can use prime95 to stress the cpu and you can use MSI kombustor for the gpu , for ram I’d just do a mem test and for the drives you can use crystal disk mark and compare it to other people’s scores with those drives .
Also to see performance compared to others components you can use cinebench r20 for the cpu and 3dmark for gpu, hope that helps!
 

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