[SOLVED] Is there a SSD that will work on my PC?

delcarto

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I want to add an SSD to my system. I just can't figure out what will work.
Also, I want to use it as a boot drive if possible.
My system is an HP Envy Phoenix 860-014 (https://support.hp.com/ca-en/document/c04816928).
My mother board is a Thimphu (https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c04790224) .
It has the following expansion slots:
One PCI Express x1 (Gen 3.0)
One M.2 socket 1, key A
One M.2 socket 3, key M
I have no idea what these slots are good for in regard to an SSD drive.
I have had a question on this issue that has been hanging unanswered on the HP support forum for days now.
Any help and insight would be much appreciated.
Please excuse my lack of knowledge around this. I have no experience with SSD's.
Thanks,
Del.
 
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USAFRet

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Personally, I'd go with an MX500 rather than the BX500.
More stable performance.

The difference between a SATA III SSD and a 7200RPM spinner is night and day.

Connections are exactly like connecting a regular HDD. Same cables and connection.

For mounting, there may be a dedicated 2.5" mount in your case.
If not, a 3.5"->2.5" adapter is easy.
https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Dual-Mounting-Bracket-CSSD-BRKT2/dp/B016498CK0
 
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jojesa

Illustrious
I want to add an SSD to my system. I just can't figure out what will work.
Also, I want to use it as a boot drive if possible.
My system is an HP Envy Phoenix (https://support.hp.com/ca-en/document/c04816928).
My mother board is a Thimphu (https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c04790224) .
It has the following expansion slots:
One PCI Express x1 (Gen 3.0)
One M.2 socket 1, key A
One M.2 socket 3, key M
I have no idea what these slots are good for in regard to an SSD drive.
You could install a SATA 2.5" SSD on any of the 5 SATA ports on tha motherboard. As suggested above I would go with this option to avoid any complications.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0781Z7Y3S

Depending on the BIOS version the M.2 socket 3, key M supports M.2 NVMe SSD.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07M7Q21N7

You could clone (copy) the current HDD into the new SSD.
You can use Acronis or Paragon free disk cloning products to clone your boot device to the new SSD device.
If you get a Samsung SSD, it does come with a link to download Samsung cloning software.
 

delcarto

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Wow. Thanks for the immediate reply. I know the image for the Thimphu board shows an M.2 slot but I cannot figure out what SSD's will work.
The PCIe slot is my target connection. My current PCIe x16 GPU seems to be blocking access to the M.2 connector. Plus, I am looking into a new GPU that would likely cover 2 chassis slots. Its is a double wide GPU.
I just got this PC about 3 years ago but I guess my board is already a bit outdated.
Thanks Tennis2,
Del.
 

delcarto

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Hey everyone. Thank you for responding. I am looking to get a 1TB SSD but a 512 would likely do the job of holding my Windows 10 OS. I live in the US so shipping should be cheap.
I do have to ask though, would the SSD plug in and lay flat against the Mobo? Or do they somehow insert and stand vertically up from the mobo?
It looks like I have the latest bios version already AMI A0.59, 1/22/18
 
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USAFRet

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For a Z170 board, I would absolutely discover and verify the properties of the M.2 port.
It may only be PCIe x2. Making an NVMe drive mostly useless, as you can't utilize its full speed.

A SATA III 2.5" drive WILL work. ANd be cheaper.
 

delcarto

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Ok, I cannot seem to get any more info on the M.2 port. So far getting answers has been difficult everywhere except on here.
So, I am looking at the following SSD. Crucial BX500 1TB 3D NAND SATA 2.5-inch SSD.
(https://www.crucial.com/ssd/bx500/ct1000bx500ssd1/ct15800723)
I guess I still have questions though.
Is the SATA III SSD significantly faster than the 7200 rpm SATA HD I have installed now?
Then, there is the question of connecting the drive. Are the install instructions straight forward so that even I can do it without headaches?
Will I need a special converter to fit the 2.5" SSD into a standard 3.5" drive bay?
Again, sorry for the lack of knowledge here.
Thanks,
Del
 
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USAFRet

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Personally, I'd go with an MX500 rather than the BX500.
More stable performance.

The difference between a SATA III SSD and a 7200RPM spinner is night and day.

Connections are exactly like connecting a regular HDD. Same cables and connection.

For mounting, there may be a dedicated 2.5" mount in your case.
If not, a 3.5"->2.5" adapter is easy.
https://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Dual-Mounting-Bracket-CSSD-BRKT2/dp/B016498CK0
 
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delcarto

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The MX500 was my first choice but Crucial doesn't have them in stock. However, I found one on Amazon for a few dollars more.
It definitely looks like I'll need a 2.5' to 3.5" adapter. I don't see anything that will hold a 2.5" drive in my PC. I ordered that as well.
Thank you for all the help. To everyone on here.
I would never have gotten this far without you all.
Del.
Wish I could give everyone a "Best Solution". You all helped immensely.
 

jojesa

Illustrious
There's SATA M.2 Crucial MX500 SSDs also. 2.5" drives isn't worth it IMO. This system can do NVMe.

Western Digital SN550 1TB = $125 is a solid performer. NVMe.

A single PCIe 3.0 lane can get nearly 1000MB/s actual bandwidth.
Just because a hardware is faster than another it doesn't automatically make the lesser not worth it.
Most users won't benefit from the faster speeds.
I have tested SATA SSDs against NVMe SSDs, in the same exact systems, and in most cases you won't even notice a difference.
Of course when you fire up a bench, NVMe shoes impressive numbers when compared to SATA SSD. But when you bring the time it takes to complete tasks (boot, restart, opening apps & files, gaming, etc), into the equation, then performance differences are almost no existent.
 

USAFRet

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Just because a hardware is faster than another it doesn't automatically make the lesser not worth it.
Most users won't benefit from the faster speeds.
I have tested SATA SSDs against NVMe SSDs, in the same exact systems, and in most cases you won't even notice a difference.
Of course when you fire up a bench, NVMe shoes impressive numbers when compared to SATA SSD. But when you bring the time it takes to complete tasks (boot, restart, opening apps & files, gaming, etc), into the equation, then performance differences are almost no existent.
Indeed.
I have an Intel 660p and a selection of SATA III SSD.

The Intel, while not the fastest NVMe drive, still benches 3x faster than a SATA III SSD.
In my normal workflow with Adobe Lightroom...specific testing showed exactly zero difference between the 660p and a 250GB-500GB-1TB Samsung 840-850-860.
The exact same procedure took the same amount of time.
 

USAFRet

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tennis2

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Both those drives are NVMe. The 660p is just QLC.

I would argue that Samsung drives have been overpriced for quite some time. They're pricing their name.

Don't get me wrong. I completely understand the "is NVMe REALLY any better in the real world" thing. But that all goes out the window when price parity has happened.
 
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