Question Is there a way to amplify an outdoor Wifi hotspot ?

rjft

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I live across the street from a public park that provides free wi-fi. I operate my pc from that signal. I don't use a conventional router just a wifi USB adapter stick. Sometimes, the signal strength is ok but other times, it needs a little help. I'd like to know if there's a device (if so, what's recommended) to amplify the signal so that both myself and my wife can access the internet simultaneously?
 

kanewolf

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I live across the street from a public park that provides free wi-fi. I operate my pc from that signal. I don't use a conventional router just a wifi USB adapter stick. Sometimes, the signal strength is ok but other times, it needs a little help. I'd like to know if there's a device (if so, what's recommended) to amplify the signal so that both myself and my wife can access the internet simultaneously?
Do you know if the park has 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz WIFI? Do you have a window that faces the park?
 
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DeauteratedDog

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Small USB adapters are the worst choice, they don't have room for a decent antennas.

Instead, look for an adapter with (physically) large antennas on cables that allow you to locate them in a good location (perhaps near a window facing the park in your case).

For example, the Asus PCE-AC68 https://www.newegg.com/asus-pce-ac68-pci-express/p/N82E16833320173
or the Asus PCE-AC88 https://www.newegg.com/asus-pce-ac88-pci-express/p/N82E16833320313R

I'm not pushing Asus here, they just provided easy examples.

And, I just realized that I didn't answer your question.

You might consider taking a router and putting in in 'client bridge mode' (the name changes between mfgs) and plugging both your PCs into it. Sometimes it can be a little iffy to get it working exactly right though, especially when you don't control the network you are connecting to.
 

kanewolf

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You might consider taking a router and putting in in 'client bridge mode' (the name changes between mfgs) and plugging both your PCs into it. Sometimes it can be a little iffy to get it working exactly right though, especially when you don't control the network you are connecting to.
This is the path I was exploring with my questions. Having a window facing the right direction, etc.... I would usually recommend a Ubiquiti locoM2 or locoM5 which could sit in a window sill or be mounted outside. Client bridge or client router mode is not universal in routers.
 
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rjft

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I've called Optimum (Altice) cable and spoke to 5 different people in their sales, customer service, and technical department and no one knew whether it was 2.4 ghz or 5 ghz. I'm assuming it's 2.4ghz.
 
You can tell if it is 2.4g or 5g by looking at your network setting while it is running.

Without direct line of sight to the location it is going to be very hard to accomplish this. It is pretty easy to buy one of the directional bridges mentioned above and point it at the site and get more signal. You signal may or may not be say coming though a wall. It might bounce off a building and come in a window. There is no way to say.

Now if you can run a cable outside and place the bridge in a location that faces the park that will work too but that is not going to be a option unless you own the property.
 

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