[SOLVED] Is there any reason to buy a kit instead of 2 separate identical RAM sticks?

S.I.R.O.

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Aug 28, 2019
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Would get a better deal buying two separate 16 gb sticks than a memory kit for the same brand and model.
 
You say they are identical, but are they really? There are lots of things that might be different between the modules but don't necessarily go into the published specifictions. One of those things is density. The modules can contain the exact amount of DRAM but use different chips that have different densities and therefore a different count of chips on the module and that can keep them from working together. That's an extyreme example but ther are others.

It's best to stick with kits. Otherwise you can throw the dice and get two separate modules. Maybe they'll work and maybe not and maybe for a while and then fail later.
 
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You say they are identical, but are they really? There are lots of things that might be different between the modules but don't necessarily go into the published specifictions. One of those things is density. The modules can contain the exact amount of DRAM but use different chips that have different densities and therefore a different count of chips on the module and that can keep them from working together. That's an extyreme example but ther are others.

It's best to stick with kits. Otherwise you can throw the dice and get two separate modules. Maybe they'll work and maybe not and maybe for a while and then fail later.
 
Reactions: S.I.R.O.
It depends on what type of memory--for ddr2 and ddr3, this works extremely well, and hence 'kits' were more of a way to simply have 2x identical modules, but it wasn't necessary.

But today's ddr4 seems quite tempermental and I wouldn't try it except with ecc registered modules as it seems they have been made to still work together in a mixed fashion without drama.
 

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