Question Is there anyways I could get 2 completely different monitors to have the same color/brightness level?

Klaz49

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Sep 26, 2019
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So im currently using a (Benq XL2720Z) and I just bought another monitor (SKU:8576080), however I'm having problems with the brightness.

I work from home and also am a gamer, I typically on my pc at least 10 hours a day. Because of this, I use a program called 'f.lux' the lowers the blue light of the monitor to reduce my eye strain.
Except, after connecting my new monitor and seeing that F.lux works with both, for some reason the new monitor is significantly brighter then my main monitor. So much that even having it on when im not looking at it is straining my eyes within 10 seconds.

I tried changing brightness and other settings in my NVIDIA control panel, but the only way I can get it low enough to be bearable, I cannot really watch anything on it or play games on it because it becomes hard to see with how dark it is.

Does anyone have any tips on what I could possibly do so that I could get the new monitor to be somewhat similar settings to main?

Note: I noticed in my Display settings that my main monitor has a color profile of "Zowie XL LCD profile D6500" im not sure if that is affecting it at all, but when selecting the second monitor it has no color profile and does not let me choose one.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
So im currently using a (Benq XL2720Z) and I just bought another monitor (SKU:8576080), however I'm having problems with the brightness.

I work from home and also am a gamer, I typically on my pc at least 10 hours a day. Because of this, I use a program called 'f.lux' the lowers the blue light of the monitor to reduce my eye strain.
Except, after connecting my new monitor and seeing that F.lux works with both, for some reason the new monitor is significantly brighter then my main monitor. So much that even having it on when im not looking at it is straining my eyes within 10 seconds.

I tried changing brightness and other settings in my NVIDIA control panel, but the only way I can get it low enough to be bearable, I cannot really watch anything on it or play games on it because it becomes hard to see with how dark it is.

Does anyone have any tips on what I could possibly do so that I could get the new monitor to be somewhat similar settings to main?

Note: I noticed in my Display settings that my main monitor has a color profile of "Zowie XL LCD profile D6500" im not sure if that is affecting it at all, but when selecting the second monitor it has no color profile and does not let me choose one.
What you have to have is monitor calibration hardware. That is hardware you plug into a USB port and it can read the brightness and color balance of each monitor. You can then tweak the settings until they are the same. Spyder -- https://www.amazon.com/Datacolor-SpyderX-Pro-Calibration-Photographers/dp/B07M6KPJ9K is one of the best known brands of monitor calibration hardware.
Without calibration hardware, you can use test images like these -- http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/ to help do "eyeball" calibration.
 
Reactions: Inthrutheoutdoor

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Depends on your definition of "the same".

To start, use a hardware device.
I have the Datacolor device linked above.

I have 2x ASUS 24", same model.
I can get them very very close. But never "exact".

This was also the case with 2x previous HP IPS panels. Bought as a set, almost sequential serial numbers. Likely came off the assembly line the same day.
Again, very very close, but never "exact".
 

Inthrutheoutdoor

Reputable
Feb 17, 2019
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What you have to have is monitor calibration hardware. That is hardware you plug into a USB port and it can read the brightness and color balance of each monitor. You can then tweak the settings until they are the same. Spyder -- https://www.amazon.com/Datacolor-SpyderX-Pro-Calibration-Photographers/dp/B07M6KPJ9K is one of the best known brands of monitor calibration hardware.
Without calibration hardware, you can use test images like these -- http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/ to help do "eyeball" calibration.
^^THIS^^ been there, done that many times back when I was working in Photoshop & Illustrator alot , worked like a charm :)
 

Klaz49

Commendable
Sep 26, 2019
45
0
1,530
0
What you have to have is monitor calibration hardware. That is hardware you plug into a USB port and it can read the brightness and color balance of each monitor. You can then tweak the settings until they are the same. Spyder -- https://www.amazon.com/Datacolor-SpyderX-Pro-Calibration-Photographers/dp/B07M6KPJ9K is one of the best known brands of monitor calibration hardware.
Without calibration hardware, you can use test images like these -- http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/ to help do "eyeball" calibration.
That tool costs more then the monitor i bought LOL thanks for the info tho!
 

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