[SOLVED] Is This Build Worth It Compared To Current?

Feb 3, 2020
18
0
10
0
Current Build:
A10-Series APU A10-8750 (3.60 GHz)
16 GB DDR3
AMD R7 1GB

New Build:
Intel Pentium Gold G5400 3.7GHz
16 GB DDR4
GTX 1650 4GB

Is this new build a substantial upgrade to my current toaster oven and is it worth a $790 pricetag?
 
Last edited:

R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
can you turn a screwdriver? if so you can build it yourself and get a better system for the price.
for example
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($172.39 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M-HDV R4.0 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($64.98 @ Amazon)
Memory: Team T-FORCE DARK Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($74.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($64.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $715.31
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-11 16:43 EDT-0400


I know its a cheap motherboard, but you had no mention of the board, RAM, New CPU, SSD, PSU, and a better GPU, re-use your case, the small mATX should fit in almost anything.

watch a video or two on youtube, familiarize yourself with the process, the forums are here and there are tutorials available to aid you. above all else read the manuals before you start.
If you can follow directions and turn a screwdriver you have all the skills to do it yourself.

here is something that might help you

Assembly grounding:
plug in the power supply to the wall. you can touch an unpainted part of the PSU (insert an unpainted unfinished screw into the PSU mounting holes and touch the screw as a grounding point) once you have grounded yourself you can now touch and assemble the parts of the PC.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the CPU into the motherboard and the RAM into the slots.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the cooler to the CPU. install the motherboard into the case.
secure the motherboard down with the screws, make sure you remove any unwanted/needed mounts before securing the motherboard.
unplug the PSU and ground yourself again. install the PSU into the case and secure with the 4 mounting screws.
plug in the power cord and ground yourself again from now on after grounding, unplug the power supply cord from the wall.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
connect the power supply to the motherboard by the 24 pin and the AUX CPU power connector, install the GPU if one is selected, and install the drives with the supplied mounts in the case. connect the front panel connections to the case according to the manuals.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
if there are any other peripherals, like wifi cards or sound card install and secure now. verify all power cables are connected to the motherboard and the GPU if needed.
the system can now be booted and the BIOS adjusted if needed (refer to motherboard manual) then an OS installed. when you are sure the system will need no more working/tinkering you can install the side panel and close the case. you have now assembled a PC.
end canned rant

the best reason to build yourself is prebuilt system cut corners to fit a price point. the corners cut are often quality. cheap PSU that allows that fancy CPU that adorns the ad. no mention of the supporting parts.
when you build yourself you control the quality. the PSU in my list has a 10 year warranty and should be able to power the next three upgrades to your system.
 
Last edited:
Current Build:
A10-Series APU A10-8750 (3.60 GHz)
16 GB DDR3
AMD R7 1GB

New Build:
Intel Pentium Gold G5400 3.7GHz
16 GB DDR4
GTX 1650 4GB

Is this new build a substantial upgrade to my current toaster oven and is it worth a $790 pricetag?
rly...pentium...
for 800$ you can get a amd beast which is 4x better than that pentium build.
Check this out: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/xFBdYH

I have the same pc but with a rx 580 8gb and its a really good system for its price
 

R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
can you turn a screwdriver? if so you can build it yourself and get a better system for the price.
for example
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($172.39 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M-HDV R4.0 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($64.98 @ Amazon)
Memory: Team T-FORCE DARK Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($74.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($64.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $715.31
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-11 16:43 EDT-0400


I know its a cheap motherboard, but you had no mention of the board, RAM, New CPU, SSD, PSU, and a better GPU, re-use your case, the small mATX should fit in almost anything.

watch a video or two on youtube, familiarize yourself with the process, the forums are here and there are tutorials available to aid you. above all else read the manuals before you start.
If you can follow directions and turn a screwdriver you have all the skills to do it yourself.

here is something that might help you

Assembly grounding:
plug in the power supply to the wall. you can touch an unpainted part of the PSU (insert an unpainted unfinished screw into the PSU mounting holes and touch the screw as a grounding point) once you have grounded yourself you can now touch and assemble the parts of the PC.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the CPU into the motherboard and the RAM into the slots.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the cooler to the CPU. install the motherboard into the case.
secure the motherboard down with the screws, make sure you remove any unwanted/needed mounts before securing the motherboard.
unplug the PSU and ground yourself again. install the PSU into the case and secure with the 4 mounting screws.
plug in the power cord and ground yourself again from now on after grounding, unplug the power supply cord from the wall.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
connect the power supply to the motherboard by the 24 pin and the AUX CPU power connector, install the GPU if one is selected, and install the drives with the supplied mounts in the case. connect the front panel connections to the case according to the manuals.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
if there are any other peripherals, like wifi cards or sound card install and secure now. verify all power cables are connected to the motherboard and the GPU if needed.
the system can now be booted and the BIOS adjusted if needed (refer to motherboard manual) then an OS installed. when you are sure the system will need no more working/tinkering you can install the side panel and close the case. you have now assembled a PC.
end canned rant

the best reason to build yourself is prebuilt system cut corners to fit a price point. the corners cut are often quality. cheap PSU that allows that fancy CPU that adorns the ad. no mention of the supporting parts.
when you build yourself you control the quality. the PSU in my list has a 10 year warranty and should be able to power the next three upgrades to your system.
 
Last edited:
can you turn a screwdriver? if so you can build it yourself and get a better system for the price.
for example
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($172.39 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI A320M-A PRO MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($58.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: Team T-FORCE DARK Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($74.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($64.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $709.31
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-11 16:33 EDT-0400


I know its a cheap motherboard, but you had no mention of the board, RAM, New CPU, SSD, PSU, and a better GPU, re-use your case, the small mATX should fit in almost anything.

watch a video or two on youtube, familiarize yourself with the process, the forums are here and there are tutorials available to aid you. above all else read the manuals before you start.
If you can follow directions and turn a screwdriver you have all the skills to do it yourself.

here is something that might help you

Assembly grounding:
plug in the power supply to the wall. you can touch an unpainted part of the PSU (insert an unpainted unfinished screw into the PSU mounting holes and touch the screw as a grounding point) once you have grounded yourself you can now touch and assemble the parts of the PC.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the CPU into the motherboard and the RAM into the slots.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the cooler to the CPU. install the motherboard into the case.
secure the motherboard down with the screws, make sure you remove any unwanted/needed mounts before securing the motherboard.
unplug the PSU and ground yourself again. install the PSU into the case and secure with the 4 mounting screws.
plug in the power cord and ground yourself again from now on after grounding, unplug the power supply cord from the wall.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
connect the power supply to the motherboard by the 24 pin and the AUX CPU power connector, install the GPU if one is selected, and install the drives with the supplied mounts in the case. connect the front panel connections to the case according to the manuals.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
if there are any other peripherals, like wifi cards or sound card install and secure now. verify all power cables are connected to the motherboard and the GPU if needed.
the system can now be booted and the BIOS adjusted if needed (refer to motherboard manual) then an OS installed. when you are sure the system will need no more working/tinkering you can install the side panel and close the case. you have now assembled a PC.
end canned rant
damn you really took a effort for this man...
 
Keep an eye on the Dell XPS desktops for sales. Right now you can get one with an i5-9400, 16GB of RAM, and a full warranty for $749. However, you'd have to buy the video card, which would then put you at around $950.

https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/desktop-computers/xps-desktop/spd/xps-8930-desktop/xdvmstcr003s?view=configurations

Then get this GTX 1660 for $200:
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/bVtQzy/pny-geforce-gtx-1660-6-gb-xlr8-gaming-overclocked-edition-video-card-vcg16606sfppb-o

Or, if you need to save some money, at $120 this RX 570 4GB will perform a little better than a standard GTX 1650:
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/tF648d/xfx-radeon-rx-570-4gb-rs-xxx-video-card-rx-570p427d6
 
Feb 3, 2020
18
0
10
0
can you turn a screwdriver? if so you can build it yourself and get a better system for the price.
for example
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($172.39 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B450M-HDV R4.0 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($64.98 @ Amazon)
Memory: Team T-FORCE DARK Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($74.98 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($64.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card ($229.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $715.31
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-05-11 16:43 EDT-0400


I know its a cheap motherboard, but you had no mention of the board, RAM, New CPU, SSD, PSU, and a better GPU, re-use your case, the small mATX should fit in almost anything.

watch a video or two on youtube, familiarize yourself with the process, the forums are here and there are tutorials available to aid you. above all else read the manuals before you start.
If you can follow directions and turn a screwdriver you have all the skills to do it yourself.

here is something that might help you

Assembly grounding:
plug in the power supply to the wall. you can touch an unpainted part of the PSU (insert an unpainted unfinished screw into the PSU mounting holes and touch the screw as a grounding point) once you have grounded yourself you can now touch and assemble the parts of the PC.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the CPU into the motherboard and the RAM into the slots.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, reground yourself again.
install the cooler to the CPU. install the motherboard into the case.
secure the motherboard down with the screws, make sure you remove any unwanted/needed mounts before securing the motherboard.
unplug the PSU and ground yourself again. install the PSU into the case and secure with the 4 mounting screws.
plug in the power cord and ground yourself again from now on after grounding, unplug the power supply cord from the wall.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
connect the power supply to the motherboard by the 24 pin and the AUX CPU power connector, install the GPU if one is selected, and install the drives with the supplied mounts in the case. connect the front panel connections to the case according to the manuals.
if you move your feet, or shuffle in your chair, plug in the cord, reground yourself and unplug again.
if there are any other peripherals, like wifi cards or sound card install and secure now. verify all power cables are connected to the motherboard and the GPU if needed.
the system can now be booted and the BIOS adjusted if needed (refer to motherboard manual) then an OS installed. when you are sure the system will need no more working/tinkering you can install the side panel and close the case. you have now assembled a PC.
end canned rant

the best reason to build yourself is prebuilt system cut corners to fit a price point. the corners cut are often quality. cheap PSU that allows that fancy CPU that adorns the ad. no mention of the supporting parts.
when you build yourself you control the quality. the PSU in my list has a 10 year warranty and should be able to power the next three upgrades to your system.
What should I do for the cooling system?

Thank you
 

R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
what is the model on the unit you have? If you can find a picture of it online and post it here that works too.
some HP cases are good and standard, others not so much.
I assumed 790 as the budget and there is plenty left for a new case if it turns out to be an oddball.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS