[SOLVED] Is this card compatible with my computer?

EphyMusic

Commendable
May 4, 2017
29
1
1,545
3
I find that Thermaltake Power supplies are actually decently reliable. However, that model in particular is not 80-Plus certified. In the interest of efficiency, I would suggest getting a power supply that has an 80-Plus certification of at least silver. 850W is more than sufficient.

If you are not gaming, then yes, that card will do nicely for 4k Video Display.

I do recommend you get a dedicated sound card or USB3.0/3.1 Audio interface if you are an audiophile (in conjunction with you being a film buff, assuming you are one), as this will immensely enhance your Surround Sound Dolby Digital/DTS experience, and give you much more control over audio profiling.
 
I find that Thermaltake Power supplies are actually decently reliable. However, that model in particular is not 80-Plus certified. In the interest of efficiency, I would suggest getting a power supply that has an 80-Plus certification of at least silver. 850W is more than sufficient.

If you are not gaming, then yes, that card will do nicely for 4k Video Display.

I do recommend you get a dedicated sound card or USB3.0/3.1 Audio interface if you are an audiophile (in conjunction with you being a film buff, assuming you are one), as this will immensely enhance your Surround Sound Dolby Digital/DTS experience, and give you much more control over audio profiling.
Personal opinions do not matter when it comes to PSUs. Thermaltake is notorious for many bad PSUs.
Also 80 plus and bronze/silver/gold/platinum/titanium/uberidium/whateverium does not mean it's reliable or good quality PSU.
There are plenty discussions on these forums about PSUs. I would suggest that you inform yourself starting with the first post of this thread:
https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/power-supply-psu-models-what-to-buy-what-to-avoid-and-psu-discussion-thread.3212332/
 

bignastyid

Titan
Moderator
I find that Thermaltake Power supplies are actually decently reliable. However, that model in particular is not 80-Plus certified. In the interest of efficiency, I would suggest getting a power supply that has an 80-Plus certification of at least silver.

If you are not gaming, then yes, that card will do nicely for 4k Video Display.
The thermaltake TR2s are notoriously bad and can damage other parts. I have seen 2 600w TR2s destroy entire systems.
80 plus/efficiency is NOT a measure of quality, there are PSU that are advertised as 80 plus gold that are junk. And judging a PSU by it's brand name is also folly, as very few brand names actually make the PSUs they sell. Many of thermltakes PSUs are low quality garbage and the ones that aren't are usually overpriced when compared to similarly performing units. The OPs TR2 RX is not a good PSU.
 
Reactions: dotas1

awb555

Honorable
Dec 14, 2014
59
0
10,530
0
If you are not gaming, then yes, that card will do nicely for 4k Video Display.

I do recommend you get a dedicated sound card or USB3.0/3.1 Audio interface if you are an audiophile (in conjunction with you being a film buff, assuming you are one), as this will immensely enhance your Surround Sound Dolby Digital/DTS experience, and give you much more control over audio profiling.
I’m having no problem with audio at the moment. The graphics card is carrying the DD/DTS via HDMI beautifully.
My new problem is:
When I watch Netflix or YouTube videos (via their apps on my TV) that support HDR my TV tells me (also PS4 games that support it). However when I try to watch them from my computer with my new 4K HDR ready graphics card. My tv doesn’t go into HDR mode and there’s black strips on the left and right side of the screen. This also happens when I watch HDR movies.
I’m mostly wanting to know: How do I get my video player on the computer to play HDR movie files? I don’t care which program it is. I’d really appreciate step-by-step directions..

I know this has been asked before in like 2016/17/18 but I couldn’t find anything more current.
 

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