Question Is this consider OC

MangaTech

Great
Sep 27, 2021
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Hi all.
When we got for example, one Mobo that supports up to 4133mhz (OC), one kit of DDR4 that supports 3000mhz and a Ryzen 5 3600 that supports up to 3200Mhz and we set the ram by XMP and it will run at that 3000mhz with 1.35v considered OC or as all values are within the specs of all the system, it's not considered OC?
I always thought OC means go above the supported values of the system.

Thanks in advanced.
 

Math Geek

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XMP is basically OC settings for that kit. it was tested and determined it could handle those specs above the standard speed they were actually making at the time. . so it is technically OC'ed when you enable the XMP profile.

however, it is also considered OC'ed if you buy ram rated for 3000 mhz and run it at 3200 or something similar since it was sold as 3000 speed ram.

so both examples are really OC'ed depending on how you look at it. the XMP profile just does it for you without you having to tinker with the settings to find the optimal speed it wants to run at. you can still manually OC that same ram stick and see what you can get it to do without using the XMP profile if you wish.

the profile is just a shortcut of known good settings you can use if you wish.
 

MangaTech

Great
Sep 27, 2021
217
17
95
4
XMP is basically OC settings for that kit. it was tested and determined it could handle those specs above the standard speed they were actually making at the time. . so it is technically OC'ed when you enable the XMP profile.

however, it is also considered OC'ed if you buy ram rated for 3000 mhz and run it at 3200 or something similar since it was sold as 3000 speed ram.

so both examples are really OC'ed depending on how you look at it. the XMP profile just does it for you without you having to tinker with the settings to find the optimal speed it wants to run at. you can still manually OC that same ram stick and see what you can get it to do without using the XMP profile if you wish.

the profile is just a shortcut of known good settings you can use if you wish.
So basically any setting above 2133mhz is considered OC? Or if I don't activate XMP in bios but set the DDR speed to 2666mhz in other option that bios have, in this case "Tweeker" it's not OC? Just curious about...
 

Math Geek

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yah, before you enable the xmp profile, it will run at its default speed. anything above that is considered an OC. whether you set it manually or through the profile. amounts to the same thing in that it is running above stock specs.
 

MangaTech

Great
Sep 27, 2021
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yah, before you enable the xmp profile, it will run at its default speed. anything above that is considered an OC. whether you set it manually or through the profile. amounts to the same thing in that it is running above stock specs.
Yes i've noticed now that in my other system, even if i set it to 2666mhz in my I7 8700k it sets the voltage to 1.35v with Trident 3200 ram.
But guess if I don't pass the limit of the mobo, cpu and ram it won't cause any harm.
 
So basically any setting above 2133mhz is considered OC? Or if I don't activate XMP in bios but set the DDR speed to 2666mhz in other option that bios have, in this case "Tweeker" it's not OC? Just curious about...
not every setting above 2133 is OC
ram overclock is done in few parts, either raising clock or reducing timings (which involves rising voltages to have lower latencies) outside of JEDEC specs

if you disable XMP and just put frequency to 2666 without touching timings or ram voltage, you would see some high latency values, for 2666 jedec, it goes with 17-17-17 up to 20-20-20 timings at 1.2v
to reduce latencies, you bump up voltage (overclock) or increase frequency (also overclock if you go past you ram or cpu specs) or you can toy with both to find some best performing combination
 

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