[SOLVED] Is this Digitalstorm build good for coding?

JohnDon9

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I'm looking for a new system for coding, no games, just coding and running 1 or 2 VMs her and there.
I need: 64GB ram
I want: 5900X (it seems good time to switch from Intel 4790K to AMD)
I want: VisionTek Radeon HD 7750 2 GB Video Card (it has 6 outputs - I have this in my current build and I see is still the best price for 6 monitors)


I configured this build at digitalstorm.com: https://www.digitalstorm.com/configurator.asp?id=4356732
(The reason I used Digitalstorm is the fact that they have an option with lower budget graphics card, which I will probably replace with Radeon above if I decide to get this build. Other websites are pushing expensive high-end graphics cards only)

Model: Digital Storm Lynx
Processor: AMD Ryzen 9 5900X (12-Core) 4.8 GHz Turbo
Motherboard: ASUS PRIME X570-P / MSI X570-A Pro (AMD X570) (Up to 2x PCI-E Devices) (No SLI Support)
System Memory: 64GB DDR4 3200MHz Digital Storm Performance Series
Power Supply: 850W Digital Storm Performance Series (Modular) (80 Plus Gold)
Storage Set 1: 1x SSD M.2 (1TB Digital Storm M.2 Performance Series) (NVM Express)
Graphics Card(s): 1x GeForce GTX 1650 4GB
Extreme Cooling: H20: Stage 2: Digital Storm Vortex Liquid CPU Cooler (Dual Fan) (Fully Sealed + No Maintenance)

for $2,567.

I wanted to compare how much would cost me to build it myself. I haven't build my own system in over 20 years but perhaps is time now, if I will overpay by too much to have it built by a professional company. I'm OK paying 25% more to the builder, but not more than that.

But pcpartpicker doesn't have any Digital storm components, so I couldn't find the exact build to compare the prices. This is what I thought was close to their build:

Except for the video card, I want this one: VisionTek Radeon HD 7750 2 GB Video Card, it's a little cheaper than GTX 1650, but only by $50-$100.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5900X 3.7 GHz 12-Core Processor ($448.99 @ Adorama)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Liquid Freezer II 360 56.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($124.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus PRIME X570-PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard ($259.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Patriot Viper Steel 64 GB (2 x 32 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($249.99 @ B&H)
Storage: Samsung 980 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($157.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: VisionTek Radeon HD 7750 2 GB Video Card ($226.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Antec P101 Silent ATX Mid Tower Case ($135.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA GQ 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1719.91
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-04-05 03:45 EDT-0400

Am I comparing similar systems? If yes, it would cost me 33% more to have it built, compared to build it on my own. Not sure I want to pay that much.
Any suggestion?

Or perhaps none of these systems are good builds for 5900X and there are better components for this CPU?
 
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Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
You could look into a higher quality PSU, from Seasonic but as it stands the DIY approach, to me, seems like the better of the two options, except for the appalling 7750 GPU in the DIY approach. That build is pretty spot on...but only if you add an RTX 3060 or higher to it as opposed to the 7750.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
You could look into a higher quality PSU, from Seasonic but as it stands the DIY approach, to me, seems like the better of the two options, except for the appalling 7750 GPU in the DIY approach. That build is pretty spot on...but only if you add an RTX 3060 or higher to it as opposed to the 7750.
 
How big are the projects you're working on? Are these codebases on the same scale as say Firefox, Chrome, or the Linux kernel or something?

For instance at home I can be productive on my Dell XPS 13 laptop and my Ryzen 5600X based desktop. The desktop also may be running two VMs, with one of them mimicking a web server I'm using from a web provider to do testing and local validation before mimicking the same things on the web server. The other VM is basically the same thing, but with a desktop environment. The VMs are also running two databases. Granted none of the code bases I work with are millions of lines, but if you're not working on huge projects and time is not really a factor, you don't need an expensive high-end machine to do coding.

I mean heck, if you don't need local testing, you can get a cheap machine, write code on it, then push it to a remote server that does the heavy lifting.
 

JohnDon9

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How big are the projects you're working on? Are these codebases on the same scale as say Firefox, Chrome, or the Linux kernel or something?
No, not that scale of projects. The current 4790K and 32GB ram can handle everything, but is getting close to be maxed out, and is 6 years old. And I want to have this new machine for another 6 years, so want to have room for bigger projects, more VMs compiling at the same time, and since I have a budget for 5900X, I want it. And the price is finally acceptable, if it lasts 6 years.


I mean heck, if you don't need local testing, you can get a cheap machine, write code on it, then push it to a remote server that does the heavy lifting.
Come on, I hope next suggestion is not that I can code everything in notepad ;) Why wouldn't I want to have good, powerful PC and everything is fast?


So, if you are saying it's overkill, thank you, but the config fits into the budget, so is good. I want to be sure my selected components fit good together and are of good quality to last 5, 6 years. I see some example of configs with 5900X for over $4K, now that I don't need, but $2K +- 20% is pretty good for 6 years of useful PC. Right?
 
No, not that scale of projects. The current 4790K and 32GB ram can handle everything, but is getting close to be maxed out, and is 6 years old. And I want to have this new machine for another 6 years, so want to have room for bigger projects, more VMs compiling at the same time, and since I have a budget for 5900X, I want it. And the price is finally acceptable, if it lasts 6 years.
Honestly, most of the time when I see people going "I built this really powerful PC for stuff I want to do in the future," they end up not actually doing that. But if it's in your budget, then I'm not going to stop you from getting what you want.

Come on, I hope next suggestion is not that I can code everything in notepad ;) Why wouldn't I want to have good, powerful PC and everything is fast?
Well I wouldn't put someone through that torture. But the thing I'm looking at is opportunity cost. If you can get your work done over time on something less expensive, then why not suggest it?

Either way, I was getting a sense of the scale of the projects you wanted to work on. Some people think that you need a really powerful system do programming when you can literally do that, and with complex projects, on a Rasp Pi.
 

JohnDon9

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Nov 3, 2016
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But the thing I'm looking at is opportunity cost. If you can get your work done over time on something less expensive, then why not suggest it?
Oh, of course, and I appreciate it! It gives me an opportunity to double down on my decision or rethink it. So, all good!

I've been looking at every AMD series in last few years and waiting for single core benchmark score to double up from 4790K (I guess this will never happen), I kept telling myself I don't need new PC, it's waste of money, this PC is still good... you know, the mental torture while seeing everybody else playing with the new, shiny AMDs :p

So, it's finally my time.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
You could look into a higher quality PSU, from Seasonic but as it stands the DIY approach, to me, seems like the better of the two options, except for the appalling 7750 GPU in the DIY approach. That build is pretty spot on...but only if you add an RTX 3060 or higher to it as opposed to the 7750.
GPU doesn't really matter, as they won't be gaming. 850w PSU is overkill, for this rig. I good 650w is plenty. I run an R7 5800x, and an RX 6800, on a 650w fractal SFX gold built by seasonic myself. If you have the cash, you may as well get a 5950x. You also want a case with better airflow. You are going to keep this 6yrs, get the best you can afford.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5950X 3.4 GHz 16-Core Processor ($589.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.90 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI MAG B550 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard ($166.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 128 GB (4 x 32 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($569.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 980 Pro 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($154.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: VisionTek Radeon HD 7750 2 GB Video Card ($226.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 4000D Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2021) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $2003.83
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-04-06 09:50 EDT-0400
 
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Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
An argument could be made for going with a high end 12th gen Intel CPU so you can experiment with writing code for the different core types. Just a thought. Windows 11 should handle it fine on its own, but might be interesting things you can do by forcing the behavior.

You can also opt for DDR5. Not ideal in terms of price, and undoubtedly worth replacing 6 years from now rather than re-using.

For longevity, you might consider a large air cooler rather than their liquid cooling. I would say downgrade to a stock cooler, or their cheapest, and swap in a large cooler when you get it.
 

JohnDon9

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If you have the cash, you may as well get a 5950x.
Hm, not sure I need this much power, but will rethink. I don't need 128GB of Ram,I do know that, I will never use above 50 probably, so 64GB should be just fine.

going with a high end 12th gen Intel CPU
Thanks, I think I'm set on AMD, never owned one. And I don't need to play around with such low level algorithms to fit different core types.

I see no need for DDR5, is just a memory. I don't play games, so chasing FPS is not my thing, where I see the fast DDR5 good be useful.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
Hm, not sure I need this much power, but will rethink. I don't need 128GB of Ram,I do know that, I will never use above 50 probably, so 64GB should be just fine.


Thanks, I think I'm set on AMD, never owned one. And I don't need to play around with such low level algorithms to fit different core types.

I see no need for DDR5, is just a memory. I don't play games, so chasing FPS is not my thing, where I see the fast DDR5 good be useful.
Fine for now, but what about 6yrs from now? Getting it now, avoids getting it later. Buy once, pay once.
 

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