Question Is this GPU repairable?

Dec 9, 2021
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I have a GPU with what seems to be a burnt memory chip, would like to know what IT would take to DIY repair it. Also if it is actually worth the time and effort to DIY repair it. I have a picture but could not see and option to upload it here. Thanks, Halse
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Unless you can source more of the same memory chips and have a hot air soldering station and some knowledge of how to replace a surface mount memory chip, no likely not.

The better question is why did the memory chip burn up, highly unlikely it was the memory that failed. So you would need to investigate the memory VRMs and the rest of the board.
 
Reactions: Halse
Dec 9, 2021
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No, genuine interest to learn about DIY repair. I have also states wrongly. It is not my card, but was hoping to buy if I could have fixed. I am posting it here in case somebody with knowhow and tools can get a good deal.
 

jasonf2

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Oct 11, 2015
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Even if you purchase all of the equipment to do the physical rework without the experience of doing it your chances of success are pretty low. That is assuming you can source parts and equipment, which is possible, but not from your local big block computer store. In addition as mentioned above something burnt that chip, so you are going to probably need a pretty decent scope setup. Which again, without some electrical engineering background is useless.

Board replacement is pretty simple. Board repair is just a bit more complicated. If you are interested in repair look for a local tv repair shop, or ham radio repair. It is getting more rare, but the TV guys will sometimes have the soldering station and scope setups to do board work. The radio guys don't tend to go terribly small, but some of them are really good at package replacement. They usually charge by the hour with a minimum and don't guarantee work like this, but if you ask nicely they will usually help you out. For what that 3090 is worth it is probably worth chasing. If you do it though count on the factory warranty to be void, so if you think there is one go that way first.
 
Reactions: Halse

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
For that to be an even-money gamble, you'd have to have a 1-in-4 chance to fix it. Burnt memory? I'd say maybe 1-in-10 for someone very experienced who knows how to approach it. Without that knowledge? Multiply it by 100. The chances that something else is damaged is far too high in something like this.

This is a horrifyingly bad idea. It's not like fixing up a chair or a dresser that you buy at a yard sale.
 
Dec 9, 2021
8
0
10
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Even if you purchase all of the equipment to do the physical rework without the experience of doing it your chances of success are pretty low. That is assuming you can source parts and equipment, which is possible, but not from your local big block computer store. In addition as mentioned above something burnt that chip, so you are going to probably need a pretty decent scope setup. Which again, without some electrical engineering background is useless.

Board replacement is pretty simple. Board repair is just a bit more complicated. If you are interested in repair look for a local tv repair shop, or ham radio repair. It is getting more rare, but the TV guys will sometimes have the soldering station and scope setups to do board work. The radio guys don't tend to go terribly small, but some of them are really good at package replacement. They usually charge by the hour with a minimum and don't guarantee work like this, but if you ask nicely they will usually help you out. For what that 3090 is worth it is probably worth chasing. If you do it though count on the factory warranty to be void, so if you think there is one go that way first.
Yes if I had more experience I would go for it. But would be taking a top big risk on this one. Ideally one would have the knowhow to test the card quickly at the sellers to determine if it was worth going for.
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
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For that to be an even-money gamble, you'd have to have a 1-in-4 chance to fix it. Burnt memory? I'd say maybe 1-in-10 for someone very experienced who knows how to approach it. Without that knowledge? Multiply it by 100. The chances that something else is damaged is far too high in something like this.

This is a horrifyingly bad idea. It's not like fixing up a chair or a dresser that you buy at a yard sale.
Yea something popped the chip. Memory doesn't just burn itself off the side of the board. Something is running hot and my bet is that the memory isn't the only damaged package on that GPU.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
The images shown in the GPU posting appear to show a blown VRM power stage, not VRAM. If it is the high-side FET that shorted out first, then 12V likely went to Vcore and the GPU is fried. If it is the low-side FET that shorted out first, then the GPU die may still be fine but the PCB may be charred beyond repair.

I'd say there is a 30% chance it is fixable.
 
Reactions: Halse
Dec 9, 2021
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The images shown in the GPU posting appear to show a blown VRM power stage, not VRAM. If it is the high-side FET that shorted out first, then 12V likely went to Vcore and the GPU is fried. If it is the low-side FET that shorted out first, then the GPU die may still be fine but the PCB may be charred beyond repair.

I'd say there is a 30% chance it is fixable.
Great comment, this is what I came to hear👍
 

jasonf2

Honorable
Oct 11, 2015
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The images shown in the GPU posting appear to show a blown VRM power stage, not VRAM. If it is the high-side FET that shorted out first, then 12V likely went to Vcore and the GPU is fried. If it is the low-side FET that shorted out first, then the GPU die may still be fine but the PCB may be charred beyond repair.

I'd say there is a 30% chance it is fixable.
I honestly didn't even look at the card.
 

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