is this psu good for this system?

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If that's actually a gray label CX 450, then, while it's still not a great power supply, it's probably ok, better at least than the older green label CX units.

I would be very careful about ordering that unit, and verify it's actually what it says it is though because the LINK for that unit, as you posted it and as it shows on Amazon indicates that it is a VS 550w, and you absolutely do not want a VS series unit, even less, by far, than that CX gray label unit.

In reality, I'd probably recommend paying 5 bucks more and getting the 550w CX unit, which is a 2017 model and a better platform with somewhat better quality than that 2015 CXm unit you linked to. This one isn't modular like that one, but it is a better unit, has a 100w higher capacity and will probably give you enough headroom that the questionable quality becomes less of a factor with that configuration.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Power Supply: Corsair - CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $49.89
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-11-18 01:02 EST-0500

 

babuta24

Prominent
Sep 11, 2018
46
0
530
0
MERGED QUESTION
Question from babuta24 : "best power supply for system?"









cx 500?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That is a green label unit. Like I said, it's MUCH worse quality. If you can't afford the units suggested earlier, then you need to save until you can. Anything lower in quality than that unit is going to be a bad purchase.
 
Newegg has the 550W Capstone-M for that price too; may be the same platform (both are made by Super Flower).

Cheap PSUs are made with inferior components (e.g. capacitors) that age poorly and fail, and/or are missing vital protection circuits such that they are readily subject to catastrophic failures from unpredictable events (sister turns on a blowdryer on the same circuit, or Mom runs the garbage disposal, or there's a lightning hit a few miles away); these catastrophic failures are likely to cause extreme voltage spikes on the outputs, typically killing one or more attached components. It is a risk not worth taking.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY