Build Advice Is this system build a good one?

Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
Hi everyone... in theory is this pc build any good? I am on a budget and you will see on a couple of these selections below ie PSU and Case that I have really kept the cost down.. The cooler I am really unsure of and not sure if it will fit the case? if I can lower the cost of any of this and keep similar performance it would be good - Any advice from you guys would be very much appreciated..
Total build cost here is £1055.32

CPU: https://www.amazon.co.uk/AMD-Ryzen-Threadripper-1920X-Processor/dp/B074CBJHCT/ref=pd_sbs_147_2/257-3608403-6770115?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B074CBJHCT&pd_rd_r=69e1e609-b886-44af-87a5-2ab064d689bc&pd_rd_w=ODzUV&pd_rd_wg=KL677&pf_rd_p=2773aa8e-42c5-4dbe-bda8-5cdf226aa078&pf_rd_r=Q24ND15WMKC95TQHSC7C&psc=1&refRID=Q24ND15WMKC95TQHSC7C
Cooler: Motherboard: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aorus-X399-AORUS-PRO-Socket/dp/B07KF7M46X/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Gigabyte+X399+Aorus+Pro&qid=1592340074&sr=8-1
TPM: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gig-GC-TPM2-0_S-Gigabyte-TPM-Module/dp/B07815MJVT/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=GC-TPM2.0&qid=1592339334&sr=8-1
Memory: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Corsair-163301-Vengeance-Performance-Desktop/dp/B016ORTNI2/ref=pd_bxgy_2/257-3608403-6770115?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B016ORTNI2&pd_rd_r=922341fd-2def-40ad-8157-1d2bb93ae361&pd_rd_w=tOv5f&pd_rd_wg=bprwx&pf_rd_p=106f838b-b7d1-46e9-83e0-f70facc857bf&pf_rd_r=QSNADZZY4Z2574GR61YG&psc=1&refRID=QSNADZZY4Z2574GR61YG (146.96)
Storage: Video Card: https://www.amazon.co.uk/XFX-Radeon-GDDR5-DVI-D-Graphics/dp/B07JQDKNXS/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=PCIe+v4.0+graphic+card&qid=1592338974&sr=8-1&th=1
Case: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01MSE30WA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Power Supply: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00JKVHLIO/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
Last edited:
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
using it for?
I work with some pretty heavy office applications and occasionally autocad.. surfing web.. Not for games.. I need a new pc... it might be a bit ott for what I need but just want it to be fast... Im just not sure if the individual components are best matched? or if I can reduce the cost of it and not loose too much performance?
 
Last edited:
Hate it.
Where to start?

1. A cheap psu is the worst place to economize.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.

2. If you are not playing fast action games, you do not need a fast graphics card.

3. Can your apps fully occupy 24 threads?
If not, a threadripper processor may not be the right choice.
A ryzen 3000 or intel 10th gen processor is likely to do better. The intel processors come with integrated graphics. I would loook at the i5-10400 or i7-10700 processors.

4. WD blue is not the best of m.2 ssd devices.

5. I don;t know what cooling a threadripper requires, but paying that much for a rgb aio seems excessive. Air coolers cost less and a good one will be equally effective.

6. I have no problem with a cheap case, so long as it has adequate intake airflow.
That would be at least two 120/140mm front intakes.
It is unclear to me what the case you selected offers in that respect.
 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
1. A cheap psu is the worst place to economize.
A cheap PSU will be made of substandard components. It will not have safety and overload protections.
The danger is if it fails under load, it can destroy anything it is connected to.
It will deliver advertised power only at room temperatures, not at higher temperatures found when installed in a case.
The wattage will be delivered on the 3 and 5v rails, not on the 12v rails where modern parts
like the CPU and Graphics cards need it. What power is delivered may fluctuate and cause instability
issues that are hard to diagnose.
The fan will need to spin up higher to cool it, making it noisy.
A cheap PSU can become very expensive.

Do not buy one.

2. If you are not playing fast action games, you do not need a fast graphics card.

3. Can your apps fully occupy 24 threads?
If not, a threadripper processor may not be the right choice.
A ryzen 3000 or intel 10th gen processor is likely to do better. The intel processors come with integrated graphics. I would loook at the i5-10400 or i7-10700 processors.

4. WD blue is not the best of m.2 ssd devices.

5. I don;t know what cooling a threadripper requires, but paying that much for a rgb aio seems excessive. Air coolers cost less and a good one will be equally effective.

6. I have no problem with a cheap case, so long as it has adequate intake airflow.
That would be at least two 120/140mm front intakes.
It is unclear to me what the case you selected offers in that respect.
Ouch...! :) Your points very much taken... Thanks for replying...!
  1. Yes I guessed already without knowing the tech details it was bad to cut cost on PSU
  2. Looking at other build types on this site around similar costs every one has much more spent on the graphics card.. much more than what i have included here (I was assuming they were mainly for gaming) so I thought the card I included was not such a fast card based on price anyway
  3. I think I will have gone over the top with processor speed but I just felt that if I was going to build a pc then it might as well be as fast as possible stretching my budget
  4. Maybe I should invest slightly more in m.2 ssd
  5. I guess I was just trying to add a bit of bling I suppose to the build with this and thought that with this rgb it would easily be sufficient to cool the processor.. I will look at this more carfully in any final choice
  6. The case is already purchased... just havent received it yet.. but everything else is yet to be bought
I want a pc that has fast processing power and Im ok with it been slightly more than what I really need, I have stretched my budget with £1000 and would preferably spend less, however I still want a fast/powerful pc and would like to build it myself however I am really struggling to understand how to build a pc and feel overwealmed with all the details of it.
Any further help or direction to a build example would be very much appreciated... or if I did base it on the ryzen threadripper 1920x what recommended components should I use to build around it?
Thanks
legepe
 
Last edited:
Probably overkill for your needs, but here are some top quality parts.

Seasonic focus gold 550w.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Seasonic-Efficiency-Cable-Free-Connection-Performance/dp/B07WQYM74W/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=seasonic+focus+550w&qid=1592408873&sr=8-1

2 x 16gb DDR4 ram kit.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Corsair-CMK32GX4M2D3000C16-Vengeance-Performance-Desktop/dp/B07B2Y6H1M/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=2x16gb+ddr4&qid=1592408826&sr=8-4

500gb samsung 970 evo plus m.2 pcie ssd
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-MZ-V7S500BW-Solid-State-Drive/dp/B07MFBLN7K/ref=sr_1_1?crid=11W6KL4VYBLH2&dchild=1&keywords=samsung+500gb+970+evo+plus&qid=1592408558&sprefix=samsung+500gb+970,aps,265&sr=8-1

the 1tb version costs twice as much. Buy the capacity you need.

LGA 1200 motherboard.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/B460M-PRO4-Supports-Processors-motherboard/dp/B088ZS6SDN/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=b460m&qid=1592408470&sr=8-4

Then, your processor choice will depend on how well multithreaded your apps are.
A i5-10400 has 12 threads.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/B460M-PRO4-Supports-Processors-motherboard/dp/B088ZS6SDN/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=b460m&qid=1592408470&sr=8-4
a I5-10600 also has 12 threads but a higher turbo speed.
I might pick this:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-Core-i5-10600-base-stroke/dp/B0883PYCB7/ref=pd_sbs_147_4/259-6338195-7687934?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0883PYCB7&pd_rd_r=552c2186-19f7-4c43-a2b1-85d8ca7eb2ce&pd_rd_w=aAWmY&pd_rd_wg=9mxvA&pf_rd_p=2773aa8e-42c5-4dbe-bda8-5cdf226aa078&pf_rd_r=ZE7AA6W9F9AMCJYVHCZJ&psc=1&refRID=ZE7AA6W9F9AMCJYVHCZJ

If your need is for more threads, the i7-10700 has 16.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-i7-10700-2-90GHz-Socket-LGA1200/dp/B0883NPRL9/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=i7-10700&qid=1592408731&sr=8-1

All come with an adequate stock cooler for a 65w processor.
The integrated graphics is sufficient for HD movie playback.
In the event that you might want a discrete graphics card for fast action gaming or for the assist of CUDA cores, you can always add such a card later.

Do you need a tpm module?
I am unfamiliar with how that works.

I have not added it up, but I think you will be well under your budget.

As to building your own as a first time builder:

MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
Yeah, there's nothing wrong with the idea of going blingy on the AIO, but it should never come at the cost of PSU quality. If you spend twice as much on cooling as the PSU, that better be because you have an expensive custom loop! I'm not against unicorn vomit myself -- my main rig has so much color it looks like a six-year-old designed it while dropping acid -- but it should never come at the expense of safety or performance.

(The advice you've been given is good, so no need for me to add anything else here)
 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
Probably overkill for your needs, but here are some top quality parts.
Thanks for this example... It looks like it will do the job..! Total cost comes in at £684.29 I guess I was fixated somewhat with AMD Ryzen.. I had just read on more than one post elsewhere that you get a bigger bang for your buck with AMD Ryzen.. is that not the case?
 
Last edited:
Both are comparable, in their own way.
For a long time, amd has made hay by offering more, but slower cores.
With ryzen, the performance per clock has finally matched Intel.
But to compensate for fewer threads, intel usually has a higher clock rate.
Ryzen is popular with gamers who will always use a discrete high powered graphics card. Today, you mostly get what you pay for with either intel or ryzen.
Reading these forums, my sense is that ryzen has more issues with ram than intel.
But, then again, a new chipset like intel 400 series can be expected to need bios updates.
I expect the new 5xx ryzen chipsets will also.
 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
Yeah, there's nothing wrong with the idea of going blingy on the AIO, but it should never come at the cost of PSU quality. If you spend twice as much on cooling as the PSU, that better be because you have an expensive custom loop! I'm not against unicorn vomit myself -- my main rig has so much color it looks like a six-year-old designed it while dropping acid -- but it should never come at the expense of safety or performance.

(The advice you've been given is good, so no need for me to add anything else here)
If I go with the intel processor like geofelt has recommended (and obviously a better PSU) and wanted to add a bit of bling :) in the process of building it... any suggestions how i would do this as these processors come with the cooler already in place?
 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
Probably overkill for your needs, but here are some top quality parts.

Seasonic focus gold 550w.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Seasonic-Efficiency-Cable-Free-Connection-Performance/dp/B07WQYM74W/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=seasonic+focus+550w&qid=1592408873&sr=8-1

2 x 16gb DDR4 ram kit.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Corsair-CMK32GX4M2D3000C16-Vengeance-Performance-Desktop/dp/B07B2Y6H1M/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=2x16gb+ddr4&qid=1592408826&sr=8-4

500gb samsung 970 evo plus m.2 pcie ssd
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Samsung-MZ-V7S500BW-Solid-State-Drive/dp/B07MFBLN7K/ref=sr_1_1?crid=11W6KL4VYBLH2&dchild=1&keywords=samsung+500gb+970+evo+plus&qid=1592408558&sprefix=samsung+500gb+970,aps,265&sr=8-1

the 1tb version costs twice as much. Buy the capacity you need.

LGA 1200 motherboard.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/B460M-PRO4-Supports-Processors-motherboard/dp/B088ZS6SDN/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=b460m&qid=1592408470&sr=8-4

Then, your processor choice will depend on how well multithreaded your apps are.
A i5-10400 has 12 threads.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/B460M-PRO4-Supports-Processors-motherboard/dp/B088ZS6SDN/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=b460m&qid=1592408470&sr=8-4
a I5-10600 also has 12 threads but a higher turbo speed.
I might pick this:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-Core-i5-10600-base-stroke/dp/B0883PYCB7/ref=pd_sbs_147_4/259-6338195-7687934?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0883PYCB7&pd_rd_r=552c2186-19f7-4c43-a2b1-85d8ca7eb2ce&pd_rd_w=aAWmY&pd_rd_wg=9mxvA&pf_rd_p=2773aa8e-42c5-4dbe-bda8-5cdf226aa078&pf_rd_r=ZE7AA6W9F9AMCJYVHCZJ&psc=1&refRID=ZE7AA6W9F9AMCJYVHCZJ

If your need is for more threads, the i7-10700 has 16.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-i7-10700-2-90GHz-Socket-LGA1200/dp/B0883NPRL9/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=i7-10700&qid=1592408731&sr=8-1

All come with an adequate stock cooler for a 65w processor.
The integrated graphics is sufficient for HD movie playback.
In the event that you might want a discrete graphics card for fast action gaming or for the assist of CUDA cores, you can always add such a card later.

Do you need a tpm module?
I am unfamiliar with how that works.

I have not added it up, but I think you will be well under your budget.

As to building your own as a first time builder:

MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
Please help.... where is the intergrated graphics? Also, where can I get either of these processors without a cooler?
 
Last edited:

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
The non K Intel chips come with a stock cooler, as do most of the Ryzen 3000 lineup. The non F labeled chips have integrated graphics, as well. In multithreaded applications, Ryzen beats Intel, right now. Since you are not gaming, the 1650s should be sufficient, for your occasional autocad work.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor (£250.56 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B550 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard (£168.67 @ Overclockers.co.uk)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory (£176.62 @ Newegg UK)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (£74.98 @ Amazon UK)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.51 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER 4 GB Twin Fan Video Card (£152.47 @ Amazon UK)
Case: Antec GX202 ATX Mid Tower Case (£45.43 @ More Computers)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (£64.99 @ Currys PC World)
Total: £986.23
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-17 23:12 BST+0100
 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
The non K Intel chips come with a stock cooler, as do most of the Ryzen 3000 lineup. The non F labeled chips have integrated graphics, as well. In multithreaded applications, Ryzen beats Intel, right now. Since you are not gaming, the 1650s should be sufficient, for your occasional autocad work.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor (£250.56 @ Amazon UK)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B550 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard (£168.67 @ Overclockers.co.uk)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory (£176.62 @ Newegg UK)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive (£74.98 @ Amazon UK)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.51 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER 4 GB Twin Fan Video Card (£152.47 @ Amazon UK)
Case: Antec GX202 ATX Mid Tower Case (£45.43 @ More Computers)
Power Supply: Corsair TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply (£64.99 @ Currys PC World)
Total: £986.23
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-17 23:12 BST+0100
Nice one... this looks good too.. now Im completely confused...! :) I was origionally thinking the AMD ryzen are faster... but I guess a lot of this comes down to personal opinion.. Whatever processor I go with intel/ryzen I would prefer that it does not come with cooler.. but that seems to be very difficult for me to find/see when looking whether they do or dont...! I would prefer if Im building my own pc to go with a water cooler and just feel its a waste of money to buy a processor and have to take off and disregard the cooler/fan!
 
I had just read on more than one post elsewhere that you get a bigger bang for your buck with AMD Ryzen.. is that not the case?
They definitely can, though that Threadripper model is a couple generations old and came out almost three years ago. It offers a lot of cores, but unless a particular application is designed to utilize that many cores, then they will be sitting around not doing anything.

The 3700X in Logain's build is a current-generation Ryzen for about the same price. It offers 8-cores with 16-threads, whereas the 1920X offers 12-cores with 24-threads. However, on average, the 3700X offers around 20% more performance per core. So in the vast majority of applications that don't utilize a ton of cores, it can be around 20% faster than the 1920X. In those applications that do fully utilize all cores, the 1920X can potentially be faster by a similar amount, however, again, those applications tend to be much less common. Things like CPU-based video encoders and photorealistic 3D renderers can fall into that category. For people primarily targeting those applications above all else, something like a 1920X might still be a decent buy, however, most other workloads would be better served by a Ryzen 3000 part.

Intel did recently increase core and thread counts at a given price point with their 10th-gen processors, making them closer to what AMD has been offering, though I think most of the Ryzen 3000 processors still offer a bit more value for the money. The 6-core, 12-thread i5-10400 in Geofelt's build is arguably a fine enough processor, though Intel doesn't hold a clock-rate advantage with these mid-range locked parts, and also limits B460 boards to DDR4-2666 memory speed, limiting performance a little more. As a result, the Ryzen 3600 not only typically costs a bit less than an i5-10400 while offering the same number of cores and threads, but also typically outperforms it, often being over 10% faster, and in worst-case scenarios generally tends to perform about the same. So, from a value perspective, AMD is still arguably the better option, at least when it comes to processors around this price range.
 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
They definitely can, though that Threadripper model is a couple generations old and came out almost three years ago. It offers a lot of cores, but unless a particular application is designed to utilize that many cores, then they will be sitting around not doing anything.

The 3700X in Logain's build is a current-generation Ryzen for about the same price. It offers 8-cores with 16-threads, whereas the 1920X offers 12-cores with 24-threads. However, on average, the 3700X offers around 20% more performance per core. So in the vast majority of applications that don't utilize a ton of cores, it can be around 20% faster than the 1920X. In those applications that do fully utilize all cores, the 1920X can potentially be faster by a similar amount, however, again, those applications tend to be much less common. Things like CPU-based video encoders and photorealistic 3D renderers can fall into that category. For people primarily targeting those applications above all else, something like a 1920X might still be a decent buy, however, most other workloads would be better served by a Ryzen 3000 part.

Intel did recently increase core and thread counts at a given price point with their 10th-gen processors, making them closer to what AMD has been offering, though I think most of the Ryzen 3000 processors still offer a bit more value for the money. The 6-core, 12-thread i5-10400 in Geofelt's build is arguably a fine enough processor, though Intel doesn't hold a clock-rate advantage with these mid-range locked parts, and also limits B460 boards to DDR4-2666 memory speed, limiting performance a little more. As a result, the Ryzen 3600 not only typically costs a bit less than an i5-10400 while offering the same number of cores and threads, but also typically outperforms it, often being over 10% faster, and in worst-case scenarios generally tends to perform about the same. So, from a value perspective, AMD is still arguably the better option, at least when it comes to processors around this price range.
Thanks for detailed explanation... however, cant find anywhere that can supply the Gigabyte B550 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard I am tempted just to go with the intel... really not sure what to do? Will this work just as well? https://www.amazon.co.uk/MSI-X570-PRO-Motherboard-Type-C/dp/B07TDST84Q/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=MSI+X570-A+PRO&qid=1592482396&refinements=p_76:419158031&rnid=419157031&rps=1&sr=8-1
 
Last edited:
Thanks for detailed explanation... however, cant find anywhere that can supply the Gigabyte B550 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard I am tempted just to go with the intel... really not sure what to do? Will this work just as well? https://www.amazon.co.uk/MSI-X570-PRO-Motherboard-Type-C/dp/B07TDST84Q/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=MSI+X570-A+PRO&qid=1592482396&refinements=p_76:419158031&rnid=419157031&rps=1&sr=8-1
The first B550 boards just came out a couple days ago, and supplies of B450 boards have been very low in recent weeks, so availability might be a bit limited for the time being.

As for that MSI X570 board, their initial X570 motherboard lineup was a bit weak in terms of VRM thermals, with the X570 A-Pro seeing some of the highest VRM temperatures when paired with 12 and 16-core processors under heavy load. That might be less of a concern with 6 and 8-core parts though. Still, you can likely find much better options than that for not much more than £150.

With B550 being so new, I don't quite know what the best boards are yet, though a number of B550 boards in the sub-£200 price range appear to fair a lot better than some similarly-priced entry-level X570 boards from the limited reviews I've seen so far, while offering a rather similar feature-set to X570...

 
Apr 26, 2020
58
0
30
0
As for that MSI X570 board, their initial X570 motherboard lineup was a bit weak in terms of VRM thermals, with the X570 A-Pro seeing some of the highest VRM temperatures when paired with 12 and 16-core processors under heavy load. That might be less of a concern with 6 and 8-core parts though. Still, you can likely find much better options than that for not much more than £150.
Thanks for info.. I am still looking... thinking... driving my self mad with it all.. ill take a look at the B550 boards
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts