Question Is this system worth $1500?

jaged

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This is for sale in my area.
I’m looking for a rig for my son who plays: Valorant, Overwatch, Rainbow 6 Siege, CS:GO

CANADIAN $$ so more expensive parts here. :)

“Mouse & keyboard included. Computer specs listed below:

  • Intel Core i7-8700K CPU @ 3.70GHz w/ liquid cooling
  • NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB GDDR5X
  • Dell Alienware Aurora R7 Series Intel Z370 LGA1151 Motherboard
  • 16GB DDR4 RAM @ 2666MHz
  • 2TB 7200RPM hard drive
  • 256GB SSD
  • wireless internet adapter built-in
  • mouse: Razer Deathadder Elite ($60 value)
  • keyboard: Razer Blackwidow Chroma ($150 value)
looking for a quick sale. Willing to negotiate price.”
 
Last edited:
Going off of market prices
8700k : $250 (it's overpriced but that's what it sells for)
small aio cooler : $50
gtx 1080 : $300
z370 dell aurora board : $150(normal z370 boards are cheaper)
16gb 2666 ram : $50
2tb hdd : $50
256gb ssd : $30
used psu's have no value
case: proprietary dell, maybe $50
used keyboard+mouse: $80

so yeah, closer to $900-$1000.
 
I would personally pass on a Dell prebuilt gaming system. I went that direction with an XPS at one point and it was a bother when it came time for upgrades.
The games you listed aren't the most demanding titles around. I think you could build a respectable new system for ~$800 that would knock those out.
 
Reactions: jaged
Seems a bit high. You can build an equivalent new computer for $1,365. Alienware adds some name brand value. Really it means weaker cooling, proprietary parts and restricted BIOS. Here is an equivalent new computer. While I say equivalent. That's just a raw comparison.
  • The GPU and motherboard support newer technologies.
  • The SSD is likely faster.
  • The RAM is faster.
  • Most importantly, it is new.
Anyways, this is just to illustrate a new equivalent. There are better optimized builds for the money. If you aren't comfortable doing it yourself. Pay someone to come to your house and set it up. Which should be doable in the $100 to $150 range.



PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10600K 4.1 GHz 6-Core Processor ($297.77 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z490-G GAMING (WI-FI) Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($229.24 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($63.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 250 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($42.49 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE 2X Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Corsair K68 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Elite Wired Optical Mouse ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Total: $1367.41
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-08-12 10:02 EDT-0400


At any rate. I would not spend $1500 on any gaming computer which did not have a 1TB NVME SSD and 8-core CPU.
 
Reactions: jaged

jaged

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Seems a bit high. You can build an equivalent new computer for $1,365. Alienware adds some name brand value. Really it means weaker cooling, proprietary parts and restricted BIOS. Here is an equivalent new computer. While I say equivalent. That's just a raw comparison.
  • The GPU and motherboard support newer technologies.
  • The SSD is likely faster.
  • The RAM is faster.
  • Most importantly, it is new.
Anyways, this is just to illustrate a new equivalent. There are better optimized builds for the money. If you aren't comfortable doing it yourself. Pay someone to come to your house and set it up. Which should be doable in the $100 to $150 range.



PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10600K 4.1 GHz 6-Core Processor ($297.77 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z490-G GAMING (WI-FI) Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($229.24 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($63.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 250 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($42.49 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE 2X Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Corsair K68 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Elite Wired Optical Mouse ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Total: $1367.41
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-08-12 10:02 EDT-0400


At any rate. I would not spend $1500 on any gaming computer which did not have a 1TB NVME SSD and 8-core CPU.
I should have indicated I’m in Canada so it’ll be more expensive but yeah I see what you mean
 

Taniki

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Take your son or go alone to a major retailer such as Best Buy or a dedicated computer store that sells the peripherals you are considering... Looks don't travel as far as feel when playing. This is what I use and my feedback on it.

DeathAdder Elite - Used the DeathAdder since Razer released it, bought a few over the years as while perfect in size and button lay out for me, if mishandled/clumsy/rough they are prone to a mouse button 'double click' issue.

BlackWidow Elite keyboard - Size of a keyboard can vary greatly nowadays, this one is longer with the numpad, soft wrist-rest and full key by key colour customisation and effects. (check some reviews and ask your son what he think he needs to play effectively). If he is prone to travel or non-dedicated gaming space, a smaller keyboard may be preferable.

NOTE: Test out the Key types in store. I accidentally purchased my keyboard in a noisy store and didn't realise how clunky the keys are. They are mega responsive, feel crisp but so so so noisy! my home office is next to a bedroom and for some families that would be a problem.
 
Reactions: jaged

jaged

Distinguished
Aug 17, 2011
99
0
18,640
4
Take your son or go alone to a major retailer such as Best Buy or a dedicated computer store that sells the peripherals you are considering... Looks don't travel as far as feel when playing. This is what I use and my feedback on it.

DeathAdder Elite - Used the DeathAdder since Razer released it, bought a few over the years as while perfect in size and button lay out for me, if mishandled/clumsy/rough they are prone to a mouse button 'double click' issue.

BlackWidow Elite keyboard - Size of a keyboard can vary greatly nowadays, this one is longer with the numpad, soft wrist-rest and full key by key colour customisation and effects. (check some reviews and ask your son what he think he needs to play effectively). If he is prone to travel or non-dedicated gaming space, a smaller keyboard may be preferable.

NOTE: Test out the Key types in store. I accidentally purchased my keyboard in a noisy store and didn't realise how clunky the keys are. They are mega responsive, feel crisp but so so so noisy! my home office is next to a bedroom and for some families that would be a problem.
Yeah this is a good point. It’s like buying a couch or bed online. You can’t know if you’ll like it until you have it
I’m using a Logitech G series mechanical keyboard and a deathadder mouse and my son uses both without complaint.
We bought him a cheap wireless keyboard/mouse package from Best Buy for his xbox and his first comment was “it feels so cheap” lol
 
Seems a bit high. You can build an equivalent new computer for $1,365. Alienware adds some name brand value. Really it means weaker cooling, proprietary parts and restricted BIOS. Here is an equivalent new computer. While I say equivalent. That's just a raw comparison.
  • The GPU and motherboard support newer technologies.
  • The SSD is likely faster.
  • The RAM is faster.
  • Most importantly, it is new.
Anyways, this is just to illustrate a new equivalent. There are better optimized builds for the money. If you aren't comfortable doing it yourself. Pay someone to come to your house and set it up. Which should be doable in the $100 to $150 range.



PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-10600K 4.1 GHz 6-Core Processor ($297.77 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Scythe Mugen 5 Rev. B 51.17 CFM CPU Cooler ($48.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus ROG STRIX Z490-G GAMING (WI-FI) Micro ATX LGA1200 Motherboard ($229.24 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 CL18 Memory ($63.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial P2 250 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($42.49 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB WINDFORCE 2X Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Keyboard: Corsair K68 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Elite Wired Optical Mouse ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Total: $1367.41
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-08-12 10:02 EDT-0400


At any rate. I would not spend $1500 on any gaming computer which did not have a 1TB NVME SSD and 8-core CPU.
Just fyi, your build in Canadian is over $1800. Looks like OP edited his original post after you posted.
 

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