pipirupi123

Honorable
Jun 21, 2014
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10,510
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my PC's PSU is a Cooler Master MWE 850 v2 (an 850W PSU) but according to PC Part Picker's Wattage Breakdown estimate my PC only draw out 463W (588W if assuming the i9 10850k processor is at PL2 - at all-core boost frequency )




Will the APC BV1000I-MS 1000VA/600W UPS be enough for my PC to atleast be able shutdown properly in the event of a power outage?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, so figure 100w (Being VERY generous) for the motherboard and assorted "sundries", we'll say a maximum of ~250w for the CPU under a full load, all core stress test (Yes, Intel's "TDP specifications" are laughable, since they are only for the maximum base clock configuration. Independent reviews always show WAY, WAY higher maximum power consumption under all core boost loads) just to play it safe (Even though we know that in real world usage you'll never likely come anywhere near that, but if you do, so what, you're covered). Then figure a maximum of 250w for the graphics card because the PCIe slot spec says 75w while the 8 pin connector is capable of 150w (For EACH 8 pin, so in this case, with only one, a max of 150w for the auxiliary circuit) BUT we also want to make an allowance for spikes because those DEFINITELY happen regardless of card model or architecture, so we'll add an extra 25w to the 225w we got based on spec.

So that gives us a theoretical maximum, based on realistic worst case scenarios, of 600w. In reality this system is going to use something moderately less than that, probably by a fair margin, but Nvidia even "recommends" a capacity of 600w or higher for the reference model 3060 ti, so we're really just about right on the money with that figure.

Not far off from your figure of 588w really, and I think that any GOOD UPS model that is designed for 600w or higher will be reasonably well suited for this configuration. One thing you might want to definitely consider however is making sure you get a Pure sine wave UPS, because I am pretty certain that PSU is going to have problems trying to use a Simulated sine wave unit.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
PSU calculators and even PCPP's estimates are usually not even in the ballpark of reality.

Is ANYTHING being manually or automatically overclocked beyond the default configuration that the hardware came with, not counting any memory XMP profiles?

How many PCIe auxiliary connectors and of what type (6 pin, 8 pin) does your graphics card require?

Do you have any RGB hardware or controllers connected that are separate from the motherboard's built in controller, including fans?

Any external USB hubs or devices?
 

pipirupi123

Honorable
Jun 21, 2014
22
0
10,510
0
PSU calculators and even PCPP's estimates are usually not even in the ballpark of reality.

Is ANYTHING being manually or automatically overclocked beyond the default configuration that the hardware came with, not counting any memory XMP profiles?

How many PCIe auxiliary connectors and of what type (6 pin, 8 pin) does your graphics card require?

Do you have any RGB hardware or controllers connected that are separate from the motherboard's built in controller, including fans?

Any external USB hubs or devices?
-No overclocks, everything is at stock frequency
-The graphic card only requires 1 8-pin connector and according to the product specs it draws out Max 200W
-No extra RGB unless the RGB lights from the RAM sticks count
-Only USB devices are the Razer Chroma keyboard, HyperX Cloud 2 Headphones and a Generic gaming mouse
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Ok, so figure 100w (Being VERY generous) for the motherboard and assorted "sundries", we'll say a maximum of ~250w for the CPU under a full load, all core stress test (Yes, Intel's "TDP specifications" are laughable, since they are only for the maximum base clock configuration. Independent reviews always show WAY, WAY higher maximum power consumption under all core boost loads) just to play it safe (Even though we know that in real world usage you'll never likely come anywhere near that, but if you do, so what, you're covered). Then figure a maximum of 250w for the graphics card because the PCIe slot spec says 75w while the 8 pin connector is capable of 150w (For EACH 8 pin, so in this case, with only one, a max of 150w for the auxiliary circuit) BUT we also want to make an allowance for spikes because those DEFINITELY happen regardless of card model or architecture, so we'll add an extra 25w to the 225w we got based on spec.

So that gives us a theoretical maximum, based on realistic worst case scenarios, of 600w. In reality this system is going to use something moderately less than that, probably by a fair margin, but Nvidia even "recommends" a capacity of 600w or higher for the reference model 3060 ti, so we're really just about right on the money with that figure.

Not far off from your figure of 588w really, and I think that any GOOD UPS model that is designed for 600w or higher will be reasonably well suited for this configuration. One thing you might want to definitely consider however is making sure you get a Pure sine wave UPS, because I am pretty certain that PSU is going to have problems trying to use a Simulated sine wave unit.
 
Reactions: pipirupi123

pipirupi123

Honorable
Jun 21, 2014
22
0
10,510
0
Ok, so figure 100w (Being VERY generous) for the motherboard and assorted "sundries", we'll say a maximum of ~250w for the CPU under a full load, all core stress test (Yes, Intel's "TDP specifications" are laughable, since they are only for the maximum base clock configuration. Independent reviews always show WAY, WAY higher maximum power consumption under all core boost loads) just to play it safe (Even though we know that in real world usage you'll never likely come anywhere near that, but if you do, so what, you're covered). Then figure a maximum of 250w for the graphics card because the PCIe slot spec says 75w while the 8 pin connector is capable of 150w (For EACH 8 pin, so in this case, with only one, a max of 150w for the auxiliary circuit) BUT we also want to make an allowance for spikes because those DEFINITELY happen regardless of card model or architecture, so we'll add an extra 25w to the 225w we got based on spec.

So that gives us a theoretical maximum, based on realistic worst case scenarios, of 600w. In reality this system is going to use something moderately less than that, probably by a fair margin, but Nvidia even "recommends" a capacity of 600w or higher for the reference model 3060 ti, so we're really just about right on the money with that figure.

Not far off from your figure of 588w really, and I think that any GOOD UPS model that is designed for 600w or higher will be reasonably well suited for this configuration. One thing you might want to definitely consider however is making sure you get a Pure sine wave UPS, because I am pretty certain that PSU is going to have problems trying to use a Simulated sine wave unit.
ah i see, thank you for the feedback
 

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