[SOLVED] Is using an PCIE sata 3 converter worth it for old motherboard?

Oct 9, 2020
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I have an Intel dh61ww with Intel Pentium G630 and also using WD Green 240gb SSD, right now my system is working fine and fast browsing, light games, photoshop editing and office applications but I wonder what if I use a PCIE sata 3 converter to maximize my ssd speed will it really give a big boost? Or it's not worth it to buy for this old system and also like I said my system is working really fast already for my needs.
Right now my SSD is running at SATA 300 while it can support SATA 600

Specs:
Intel Pentium G630
Intel DH61ww
Kingston Ddr3 1333 4Gb x 2
Asus HD 6770 Gddr5 1Gb
WD green 240Gb SSD
Inplay GS450
 

USAFRet

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Just leave it.

In one of my older systems, there is a SATA II SSD (Sandisk) and a SATA III SSD (Samsung).

For light use, I can barely tell the difference.

Its not just the drive speed, but also the whole rest of the system.

Just leave it as it is.
(In addition to the fact that it won't work as your OS drive)
 
Oct 9, 2020
44
3
35
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Your WD Green SSD is already among the slowest solid state drives around, no matter what port it is in.

Putting that in a PCIe slot is unlikely to be able to boot up, and won't really affect speed much if this is a secondary drive.
This is my main OS drive actually I already used a Sata 2 to Sata 3 PCIE adapter before that I borrowed but I haven't tested it much and I think your right I can't feel the speed difference in short period of using it maybe my SSD is just limited at this speed but anyways in terms of my needs I am happy with it.. maybe it's not really worth it to buy an sata 3 converter for it
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
149,620
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Just leave it.

In one of my older systems, there is a SATA II SSD (Sandisk) and a SATA III SSD (Samsung).

For light use, I can barely tell the difference.

Its not just the drive speed, but also the whole rest of the system.

Just leave it as it is.
(In addition to the fact that it won't work as your OS drive)
 
Oct 9, 2020
44
3
35
0
Just leave it.

In one of my older systems, there is a SATA II SSD (Sandisk) and a SATA III SSD (Samsung).

For light use, I can barely tell the difference.

Its not just the drive speed, but also the whole rest of the system.

Just leave it as it is.
(In addition to the fact that it won't work as your OS drive)
Thanks for the advice sir I think I better upgrade my CPU to i5 2400 instead rather than spending with this thing.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
My Motherboard only supports Sata 2.0 while my SSD need 3.0 to use it's full potential
You just answered your own question. You could have a pcie 20.0 converter and a sata 20.0 ssd, but the best your motherboard can do is sata 2.0/pcie 2.0. It's the worst part of electronics, you are made obsolete by what comes tomorrow.

Won't be long before Windows will render your pc useless, sorry, kinda like trying to run Win10 on stuff designed a few years ago for Win98SE.
 
Oct 9, 2020
44
3
35
0
You just answered your own question. You could have a pcie 20.0 converter and a sata 20.0 ssd, but the best your motherboard can do is sata 2.0/pcie 2.0. It's the worst part of electronics, you are made obsolete by what comes tomorrow.

Won't be long before Windows will render your pc useless, sorry, kinda like trying to run Win10 on stuff designed a few years ago for Win98SE.
Not really FYI intel already stop the support for this 2nd Gen intel processors and also the motherboard for windows 10. But windows 10 will install smoothly without installing additional drivers windows 10 says "I got it" still working fine and fast. <Mod Edit>
 
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USAFRet

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Not really FYI intel already stop the support for this 2nd Gen intel processors and also the motherboard for windows 10. But windows 10 will install smoothly without installing additional drivers windows 10 says "I got it" still working fine and fast. <Mod Edit>
While your system is (currently) nowhere near too old to worry about Win 10 support, he's not really wrong.

Win 7 won't (easily) install on new hardware.
And Win 10 won't install on a Pentium D or older.


And lay off the personal attack. OK?
 

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