[SOLVED] Is Water Cooling Save in i7 9700K / i9 9900K?

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Good day,

I wanna warn right away I am a newby when it comes to certain PC knowledge or its components, so do appologize in advance folks.

I want to invest in either i7 8700 (not K), or i7 9700K or maybe i9 9900K.

I kinda want to buy a solid PC for gaming only, no real designing or any special and serious software that I would need to install other than occasional browsing and gaming on the highest settings and wanted to get an i7 9700K or even i9 9900 even though i saw/read that there isnt really a need in upgrading to i9 these days still as i7 8700s are still doing a good job, but in any case i ran into the fact that looks like if i purchase from here, which is where i am aiming at: (thats the pc im aiming at) https://www.dell.com/en-ca/shop/cty/pdp/spd/alienware-aurora-r8-desktop/daar8_f_s43e

Those 9th gen systems have to come with a water cooling systems, which i do understand since they are faster and hotter etc, its best to have a water cooling system for those CPUs, but thats where the scare comes in and therefore the questions.

I literally just want a system that I can connect to power like my current i7 6700, turn the power on/off like i did for the past 3 years on my current pc without bothering too much bout anything except for occasional cleaning etc.

Will water cooling system require certain knowledge of me to take care of it? Do i have to change the liquid or what not, do i have to set anything up myself once i take new pc out of the box or i shouldnt worry?

I heard if water somehow leaks then pc can be damaged (which is obvious) and thats gonna be a very expensive pc to t damage if something stupid like a drop of water which wouldnt even be caused by me, woudl destro a few thousad bucks PC :(

Do those i7 9700 and i9's come already with water cooling systems installed and i dont have to open the box and do anything or it requires me to install it myself cause if so im in trouble :) as i have no clue what to do with it :D I was hoping if i buy an i7 9700k or i9, i can just plug it in and play without doing anything else to that water cooling system, hoping that it works just like a normal fan, but even then it scares me a bit, not sure if its safe and thats why im thinking if i shoudl just buy i7 8700, save money, since im a newby if something breaks and i wont be able to fix it. Btw i will be including RTX 2080 in itm wether its i7 or i9, if that makes any difference, so i wonder if should stay safe with i7 8700 with rtx 2080 and hope this cpu lasts at lest 2 more year or risk and get an i7 9700 or i9 and then worry what if something happens with the cooling system and that causes some pc damage which i'd have no clue how to deal with.

ITs too much of a text, i do appologize for this, its hard to explain in simple words, watned to give as much infop as possible, but would appreciate if somone could either confirm the scareness of having water cooling system even thoguh its better or confirm there is nothign to worry aobut.

Main concern though i want to know if i have to install anything when i buy the pc or it comes already ready to go and i dont need to EVER do anythign to that cooling system and if its gonan be just like a normal fan which you never touch and it just works, cause if i have to take of liquid/water or whatever there is and change things then that might not be fun.

thank you
 
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Darkbreeze

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There is no required maintenance or anything special you need to do for an All In One liquid cooler. It is not like a custom loop water cooler where there are special procedures and chemicals that need to be changed. An AIO is good to go until it stops working for the most part.

Honestly, for any of those CPUs you could do just as well really if you don't plan to do any overclocking of the CPU, with a very good air cooler. Water cooling is not a necessity.

But if you want to use an AIO cooler, it is not a big deal. It is no more work or concern than using an air cooler once it's installed.
 
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fragment0

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There is no required maintenance or anything special you need to do for an All In One liquid cooler. It is not like a custom loop water cooler where there are special procedures and chemicals that need to be changed. An AIO is good to go until it stops working for the most part.

Honestly, for any of those CPUs you could do just as well really if you don't plan to do any overclocking of the CPU, with a very good air cooler. Water cooling is not a necessity.

But if you want to use an AIO cooler, it is not a big deal. It is no more work or concern than using an air cooler once it's installed.
Gotcha, so i guess it means all those all in one pre built pcs i would order would come with everything installed, so it is pretty much safe and i shouldnt worry about the liquid/water leakages, water levels or them drying out forcing computer to overheat or anything like that and it should still run for years without me even openning the box and checking anything in there, even if i bought an i9 9900 which would be really hot apparently if i overload it with stuff? That's cool then.

Just a ittle question though. Is i7 8700 (not K) + RTX 2080 still a good buy and would last for 3-4 years or shouldn't even go for i7 8700 anymore, if its not going to be able to handle the games of 2020-2023 or so. Or what about i7 9700K, will tthis one with 2080 graphics be able to handle all new games on maximum or at least high settings for the games to come in the next 3-4 years?

Thank you
 
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ElectrO_90

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AIO's are great if you want super quiet, and lots of space in your case and looks great (kraken)
But, they do FAIL and they can leak, the leak is very rare, but fails are common.
Safest thing is to buy a decent Heatsink and Fan Cooler - no leaks, and if something fails, it's the fan and it can be easily replaced. AIO's failures are always the pump.

As much as it is nice to buy computers already made and Alienware is great - still comes in the problem you pay more for the item than you should but you do get better warranty on it.

Maybe consider building yourself one, save money and get exactly what you want. It's not complicated to build one, you can watch many tutorials on how to do things. The problem comes if you have a problem, which is what this forum is for to help you out.

This should be almost exactly as the Alien Build - see price

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel - Core i7-8700 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($299.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 RGB Black Edition 57.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($36.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte - B360N WIFI Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard ($98.90 @ Amazon)
Memory: GeIL - EVO SPEAR 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($67.98 @ Newegg)
Storage: Patriot - Scorch 256 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($37.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB GAMING Video Card ($698.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($83.88 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($99.39 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1494.10
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-17 07:49 EDT-0400
 
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DavidM012

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Replacing a fan in say, 5 years time isn't the same hassle as replacing a failed pump. If the pump goes the entire aio unit needs replacing but a chunk of metal heat sink, so long as it isn't a faulty one out of the box, with a warped/convex/concave base, or cracked heat pipe, doesn't have any moving parts to fail.

That said, there are aio's that have 5yr warranties so there isn't much in the competition stakes you're down to fine detail in the price/performance stakes. Say you get a cooler for $80 that lasts 5 years that's 31 cents a week for 5 years on average. And with a 5 yr warranty you get another 5 years. Buy one get one free.

Say your lump of metal works fine for 20 years then it's 8cents a week. Either is affordable enough to buy any variety or style that suits your likes & specs of the pc. All you need to do from time to time is re-apply the thermal paste and replace a fan. The difference is really cents than dollars. So it's what you like. A good cooler should last as long as the pc, and more so long as the manufacturer maintains socket compatibility and offers mounting mechanisms for new sockets.

Sometimes products retire or disappear from the market, or even tech companies go under or are acquired by others, so the system isn't always about the tech specs of the product, it can be about the fortunes of tech companies as well, apart from innovations that change the market.
 
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fragment0

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So, if I buy this https://www.dell.com/en-ca/shop/cty/pdp/spd/alienware-aurora-r8-desktop/daar8_f_s41e with pre-built "Alienware™ 850 Watt Multi-GPU Approved Power Supply with High Performance Liquid Cooling", will i have to do any maintenence or worry bout it? The whole point is that i want to buy either i7 9700 or i9 9900 already pre-built, im not planning on dealing with componensts and buying/installing anything myself, or anything like that, i want to buy an all in pc and and just wonder if that pre-built pc i buy woudl require me to do anything to its liquid colling system still or i shoudlnt worry bout and let it do its thing inside the box for a few years without having to open the box to constantly check if all is okay with it.

or i shoudl just stick with the old school i7 8700 with rtx 2080 with no liquid cooling and be safe that the normal air fan would last for years without me openning the box and checking on it. I just need a plug in play system.
 
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ElectrO_90

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So, if I buy this https://www.dell.com/en-ca/shop/cty/pdp/spd/alienware-aurora-r8-desktop/daar8_f_s41e with pre-built "Alienware™ 850 Watt Multi-GPU Approved Power Supply with High Performance Liquid Cooling", will i have to do any maintenence or worry bout it? The whole point is that i want to buy either i7 9700 or i9 9900 already pre-built, im not planning on dealing with componensts or anything like that, i want to buy an all in pc and just wonder if that pre-built all in pc i buy woudl require me to do anything to its liquid colling system or i shoudlnt worry bout and let it do its thing inside the box for a few years without openning and keeping an eye on it.

or i shoudl just stick with the old school i7 8700 with rtx 2080 with no liquid cooling and be safe that the normal air fan would last for years without me openning the box and checking on it. I just need a plug in play system.
As stated in my post, you are spending more $2500 on a product worth $1500
Sure if you got all the money in the world, go with everything, why not.
At the end of the day - Things break, no matter what it is you own, it will at one time in its life break. Cars, clothes, houses, whatever it is, it breaks. As to when it breaks is a guess.
 
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DavidM012

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4 years warranty with premium support plus is $1109 is not something I would spend on, I'd build 2 pc's for that and do all the troubleshooting myself, having bought all the parts read the reviews, built it myself and having each component with it's own warranty and rma in case of an odd doa product, which hasn't actually ever happened to me apart from 1 cruddy psu in 20 years of building my own pc. Oh and 1 cruddy cheap cruddy ssd, that I shoulda known better anyway. I tend to go down the route of, upgrade the core system, mem cpu and ram, than buy a pre built, as for worrying about it, well there's always something to tweak.

Also I don't spend huge $$$ only to play every new title I have over 100 games in my inventory, played most of them sub-hd until fairly recently, dabbled a bit in overclocking & water cooling to see what the issues are, battled with a couple of frightful drips on my custom loop, had the near misses, sorted it out with glue, all entertainment from my perspective, nothing that is really recommended for others to dabble in but overall, my pc hasn't had a full day's downtime in 3-4 years.

Will the components die someday, of course, but will more likely be obsolete from a performance point of view, before that happens. Luckily there's plenty of new incoming products at sharp pricing to choose from. At around $2 dollars a week to run a $500 pc for 5 years, woohoo, you can do anything you like. The main thing is to read up on the specs. of the products + reviews to ensure everything's compatible, try to avoid known technical issues where possible there is no shortage of information on it either.
 

fragment0

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Thanks to everyone for their responses, even though most of them were unrelated to the questions asked and I still have same questions, but its fine.

I think I might have found a PC that doesnt havea liquid cooler https://www.ibuypower.com/Store/Gaming-RDY-BQIBG201 but now im not sure if 650WATT is enough for ithat machine Intel i7-9700K, MSI Z390 A PRO Motherboard with WiFi, MSI RTX 2080 8GB Video Card, XPG 16GB (8GBx2) DDR4-3200 RGB Memory, 500GB Western Digital Blue SSD + 2TB Hard Drive, Windows 10. But I guess ibuypower would know if wasnt enough or not. Im not planned to overclock and do any fancy stuff, just pretty much gaming couple of days a week massivly on the highiest settings, so not sure if 650 would be enough, especially if i upgrade in a few yers, not sure why its not 850, but maybe somone could clarify.

Also still gonna ask the main question i have, if i do indeed go with an all in pre built pc for i7 9700 that has a liquid coller in it, i dont have to maintenence it, right? its plug and play? i wont need to keep an eye on liquid or anything like that? i just want it to be just like and air fan which i havent touched in 3 years and never had an issue, or i do need to check on that liquid thing from time to time. Thanks again to everyone.
 

DavidM012

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Looks like there's a saving of about $100 to be had building your own. The 2080 is a v.expensive gpu. Well it's pretty close can't find the ibuypower gaming mouse and kyb on pcpp. You can get it from their site for $25
 
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Darkbreeze

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I'm not going into great detail unless REQUIRED to do so, which I CAN do if necessary along with a LONG, LONG list of reasons and linked threads showing why you would want to avoid them, but don't even bother LOOKING at anything iBuypower or CyberpowerPC have to offer. Of ALL possible choices, aside from Walmart's prebuilt systems, they are the absolute worst and they are assuredly even worse than Walmart in terms of after purchase support. Complete junk with support that is equally complete junk.

You are making ALL of the most common rookie mistakes, no offense intended, such as assuming that a "600 watt" power supply actually MEANS something. It doesn't. What matters is the SPECIFIC MODEL or series that it comes from. That is to say that there are a GREAT NUMBER of 1000w, or 600w, or 800w (Or whatever number you want to plug in) power supplies that cannot be trusted to power a strip of LED lights much less a computer system, and in further point of fact it is well known that these prebuilt vendors almost always use the cheapest quality and priced power supplies they can get away with in order to lower the cost of the units overall price OR increase their profit margin. The result, you get garbage.

In answer to your question, yes, they know if it is enough or not, they just don't CARE so long as it makes it to your front door, and maybe not even beyond the point at which your credit card gets charged.

If you require examples, I'll happily fill the next two pages of this thread with them, but most here have already seen these and know better. And iBuypower and CyberpowerPC are not the only two guilty prebuilt system vendors either. While some are better than others, MOST are in the same boat when it comes to offering low quality parts in return for a low price. That will never change. You get, what you pay for. If you want a prebuilt system that is halfway decent you WILL pay for it.

The ONLY way to get a system that included ALL high quality parts, and it will probably have a much longer warranty on the majority of those parts than if you bought a prebuilt system that offers only a single warranty covering everything, that is much shorter than the warranties of many of the parts individually, is to build it yourself or purchase the parts and have somebody reputable assemble and test it for you.
 
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DavidM012

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I would've thought in the case of a pre-built you'd have to rma the entire pc for a warranty repair of 1 component if that were necessary, at that price they don't appear to be making any money off the build but it's more convenient to rma 1 component if necessary than the entire pc, should the worst happen and you need a warranty repair. Each component will have their own warranty anyway.

Pc partpicker says there's $80 of mail in rebates whatever that is, and I haven't seen the be quiet! psu recommended anywhere, rather seasonic focus, evga g2,g3, along with others

Looks like you could save another few bucks buying the evga brand of 2080.
 
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The specs of the ibuypower prebuilt are very good.
9700K is as good as it gets for gaming.
cooler is ok.
The z390 motherboard will allow overclocking.
650w psu is bequiet straight power 11, a very good unit.
RTX2080 is very appropriate.
So far as pre-builts go, that is one of the best set of specs.

Customer support and other issues may be a different matter.
feedback cyberpower varies.
 

DavidM012

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DarkBreeze wouldn't recommend either of them. I'd also prolly think a bit more about the cooler. The Scythe silent one is $64 but at 14db, it's so silent you don't know it's there. And maybe prolly one of the quality 850's for overclocking. &I would care less about tempered glass side panels or rgb or that and just stuff it in my cheap $30 thermal take v3 chassis, 'cos I like 4 5.25 bays and the 6 3.5 inch drive bays, it needs a tray for a 2.5 inch ssd but since the ssd is m.2 it's on board, not a problem. Tempered glass side panel to me means one day it smashes somehow. Pretty heavy to lug about as well. Think that's about the extent of my difficult customerness. Oh but I have a media dashboard in a 5.25 bay for usb 3 & card reader. The ttv3 case doesn't have usb 3 front ports native.


Just putting that list there so I can clear the pc partpicker page.
 
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fragment0

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I'm not going into great detail unless REQUIRED to do so, which I CAN do if necessary along with a LONG, LONG list of reasons and linked threads showing why you would want to avoid them, but don't even bother LOOKING at anything iBuypower or CyberpowerPC have to offer. Of ALL possible choices, aside from Walmart's prebuilt systems, they are the absolute worst and they are assuredly even worse than Walmart in terms of after purchase support. Complete junk with support that is equally complete junk.

You are making ALL of the most common rookie mistakes, no offense intended, such as assuming that a "600 watt" power supply actually MEANS something. It doesn't. What matters is the SPECIFIC MODEL or series that it comes from. That is to say that there are a GREAT NUMBER of 1000w, or 600w, or 800w (Or whatever number you want to plug in) power supplies that cannot be trusted to power a strip of LED lights much less a computer system, and in further point of fact it is well known that these prebuilt vendors almost always use the cheapest quality and priced power supplies they can get away with in order to lower the cost of the units overall price OR increase their profit margin. The result, you get garbage.

In answer to your question, yes, they know if it is enough or not, they just don't CARE so long as it makes it to your front door, and maybe not even beyond the point at which your credit card gets charged.

If you require examples, I'll happily fill the next two pages of this thread with them, but most here have already seen these and know better. And iBuypower and CyberpowerPC are not the only two guilty prebuilt system vendors either. While some are better than others, MOST are in the same boat when it comes to offering low quality parts in return for a low price. That will never change. You get, what you pay for. If you want a prebuilt system that is halfway decent you WILL pay for it.

The ONLY way to get a system that included ALL high quality parts, and it will probably have a much longer warranty on the majority of those parts than if you bought a prebuilt system that offers only a single warranty covering everything, that is much shorter than the warranties of many of the parts individually, is to build it yourself or purchase the parts and have somebody reputable assemble and test it for you.
Thank you for the info, much appreciated, no need to go into too many details, but ill just ask the last question. What about a pre-built pc with a liquid cooler? lets say an i7 9700k or i9, is any knowledge or maintenece required for that liquid cooler in it or is it a plug and play pc that comes with those? I dont need to check on that liquie cooler and change liquid or what not, i can literally go without checking on that built in liquid coller for years just liek it is with air coolers without checking on it or i do have to maintain it to prevent any issues, such as leakage etc?
 

Darkbreeze

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Any all in one cooler not only DOESN'T need to have anything done with it in terms of maintenance, there is nothing you COULD do in that regard even if you wanted to.

But I think you could save yourself about 1000 dollars by doing this yourself. Honestly, I know 14yr olds that can build systems, and have seen many over the age of 70 do it, so there is little reason that any reasonably intelligent person couldn't manage to assemble their own PC.

I understand if you feel like you have too many thumbs, but it's really not all that difficult.
 
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fragment0

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Any all in one cooler not only DOESN'T need to have anything done with it in terms of maintenance, there is nothing you COULD do in that regard even if you wanted to.

But I think you could save yourself about 1000 dollars by doing this yourself. Honestly, I know 14yr olds that can build systems, and have seen many over the age of 70 do it, so there is little reason that any reasonably intelligent person couldn't manage to assemble their own PC.

I understand if you feel like you have too many thumbs, but it's really not all that difficult.
Wonderful, thank you!

This thready can now be considered as solved!

Appreciate.
 

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