[SOLVED] ISP router better than my personal router?

Mar 1, 2020
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I have my modem, router, and TV all in one box provided from my ISP, which should provide me with 400mbps. My house is big and the signal isn't that good in some areas so I have the Deco m5 mesh router:

https://www.tp-link.com/us/home-networking/deco/deco-m5/#specifications

It is capable of handling the 400mbps speed. So I connected the Deco m5 into one of the gigabit ports from the all in one box. This means that I have two different networks. (one provided from the all in one box and the one provided through the Deco m5). The speed tests I conducted on the m5 showed that my speeds ranges from 100-150mbps. However if I conducted the same speed tests on the same computer in the same location my speeds are now 250-300+. I have contacted my ISP about this and they enabled mesh technology in the all in one box but nothing changed.

I don't know what else I can do to fix this. If someone could help me I would greatly appreciate it.
 
Some ISP provided router/modems have very good WiFi (the quality of antenna has a lot to do with it).

I agree with everything Bill said.

I will add one other thing. Your Deco system includes WMM. This is a protocol that attempts to ensure your streaming applications have enough bandwidth to give you a good experience. How do they do this? By slowing down other connections. Poor implementations of this can effect speed tests.

The m5 can match the speed of your ISP provided WiFi, but it adds more complexity which means there is more of a chance of a slower connection.
 
Reactions: sppatel21
Why exactly would you expect "MESH" to be some magic speed solution. It is purely marketing to get people to buy new hardware. It is just a new term for repeater/extender.

You need to understand the numbers in the specs for the devices to really know what to expect.

That deco unit is a pretty average device spec wise. Maybe the ISP router is running 3x3 mimo rather than 2x2. But your end device matters also.

The 250-300mbps is about the maximum you can expect from wifi and that assumes you are fairly close to the router with minimal interference from other wifi sources.

No wifi is going to get 400mbps.

If it works with the ISP router just put the mesh device in a drawer and use the ISP router. The network will be simpler. Now if you actually run the mesh unit as a repeater...ie not plugged in via ethernet you expect the speed to drop by at least 1/2 because you have double the radio signals.
 
Mar 1, 2020
3
0
10
0
Why exactly would you expect "MESH" to be some magic speed solution. It is purely marketing to get people to buy new hardware. It is just a new term for repeater/extender.

You need to understand the numbers in the specs for the devices to really know what to expect.

That deco unit is a pretty average device spec wise. Maybe the ISP router is running 3x3 mimo rather than 2x2. But your end device matters also.

The 250-300mbps is about the maximum you can expect from wifi and that assumes you are fairly close to the router with minimal interference from other wifi sources.

No wifi is going to get 400mbps.

If it works with the ISP router just put the mesh device in a drawer and use the ISP router. The network will be simpler. Now if you actually run the mesh unit as a repeater...ie not plugged in via ethernet you expect the speed to drop by at least 1/2 because you have double the radio signals.
So there isn't really a way for my m5 to match the same speeds as the ISP router as long the m5 is connected to the ISP router?
 
Some ISP provided router/modems have very good WiFi (the quality of antenna has a lot to do with it).

I agree with everything Bill said.

I will add one other thing. Your Deco system includes WMM. This is a protocol that attempts to ensure your streaming applications have enough bandwidth to give you a good experience. How do they do this? By slowing down other connections. Poor implementations of this can effect speed tests.

The m5 can match the speed of your ISP provided WiFi, but it adds more complexity which means there is more of a chance of a slower connection.
 
Reactions: sppatel21
Mar 1, 2020
3
0
10
0
Some ISP provided router/modems have very good WiFi (the quality of antenna has a lot to do with it).

I agree with everything Bill said.

I will add one other thing. Your Deco system includes WMM. This is a protocol that attempts to ensure your streaming applications have enough bandwidth to give you a good experience. How do they do this? By slowing down other connections. Poor implementations of this can effect speed tests.

The m5 can match the speed of your ISP provided WiFi, but it adds more complexity which means there is more of a chance of a slower connection.
Thank you for your help! I think I will use both routers then because I do still need coverage from the m5 that the ISP can't match in some areas and deal with the slower speeds
 

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