Issues for extra large hard drives.

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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

The largest disk drive that I have used was for Video was 120GB. Are there
any particular issues to consider when using much larger drives for video
editing using Windows XP. Is there a limit on partition size for instance.
--
Thanks in advance
 
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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"Videot" <videot@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:40b144d3$0$3036$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
> The largest disk drive that I have used was for Video was 120GB. Are
there
> any particular issues to consider when using much larger drives for video
> editing using Windows XP. Is there a limit on partition size for
instance.


http://support.octek.com.au/FAQ/faq_0053.htm
 
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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

"twobirds" <notareal@eaddy.com> wrote in message
news:BMqdnTj-WaXt_yzdRVn-gw@bresnan.com...
>
> "Videot" <videot@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
> news:40b144d3$0$3036$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
> > The largest disk drive that I have used was for Video was 120GB. Are
> there
> > any particular issues to consider when using much larger drives for
video
> > editing using Windows XP. Is there a limit on partition size for
> instance.
>
>
> http://support.octek.com.au/FAQ/faq_0053.htm
>
I plugged a 200 gb Western Digital drive into a Tyan S2266 motherboard, an
older P4 board that made no mention of 48 bit LBA.
It formatted and appears to be recognized without difficulty.

Perhaps other motherboards have the ability even if it wasn't specified.
 
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"Robert Morein" <nowhere@nowhere.com> wrote:
> I plugged a 200 gb Western Digital drive into a Tyan S2266 motherboard, an
> older P4 board that made no mention of 48 bit LBA.
> It formatted and appears to be recognized without difficulty.
>
> Perhaps other motherboards have the ability even if it wasn't specified.

Have you filled the drive with more than 137GB of data?
 
G

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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

When you are doing video editing it's easy. I know people in our video club
that have machines with over 300GB filled on a PC when they are juggling
several projects at once.


"Samuel Paik" <sam@paiks.org> wrote in message
news:309a88d5.0405241313.28a6d7d0@posting.google.com...
> "Robert Morein" <nowhere@nowhere.com> wrote:
> > I plugged a 200 gb Western Digital drive into a Tyan S2266 motherboard,
an
> > older P4 board that made no mention of 48 bit LBA.
> > It formatted and appears to be recognized without difficulty.
> >
> > Perhaps other motherboards have the ability even if it wasn't specified.
>
> Have you filled the drive with more than 137GB of data?
 
G

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Videot wrote:

> When you are doing video editing it's easy. I know people in our video club
> that have machines with over 300GB filled on a PC when they are juggling
> several projects at once.
>

He's not saying it's not possible.

You have to remember that this is a very specific issue with one particular type
of of controller. Some older controllers have issues with large drives.

A Tyan S2266 is pretty ancient, which makes the question a logical one.


>
> "Samuel Paik" <sam@paiks.org> wrote in message
> news:309a88d5.0405241313.28a6d7d0@posting.google.com...
> > "Robert Morein" <nowhere@nowhere.com> wrote:
> > > I plugged a 200 gb Western Digital drive into a Tyan S2266 motherboard,
> an
> > > older P4 board that made no mention of 48 bit LBA.
> > > It formatted and appears to be recognized without difficulty.
> > >
> > > Perhaps other motherboards have the ability even if it wasn't specified.
> >
> > Have you filled the drive with more than 137GB of data?
 
G

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Archived from groups: rec.video.desktop (More info?)

Here's the issues involved. Basically, above 137GB, you'll be looking
at Windows XP + SP1/windows 2000 + latest SP/Linux for built-in support
of large HDs. Otherwise, you'll need other additional components to
support large HDs. That said, if you want to easily move a HD to
another system w/o worry, you will want to buy and use <137GB HDs (eg.
120GB HDs). Otherwise, you will need to make sure the system you move a
HD to supports large HDs.:

Operating System and BIOS Limitations:
Computer operating systems and system BIOSs have separate limitations
that are related to
specific drive capacities. The capacity points that can affect how your
operating system and system BIOS support your drive are 137GB, 32GB, and
8.4GB. Below is a quick reference chart that you may use as a guide to
determine the drive capacity supported by your BIOS.

BIOS Dates prior to May not support drives larger than
Aug 1994 528MB
Feb 1996 2.1GB
Jan 1998 8.4GB
Jun 1999 32GB



A brief description of each limitation appears below:

137GB (128GB binary) Barrier:
On many systems, the IDE/ATA interface uses a 28-bit addressing which cannot
recognize more than 137GB of storage. To overcome this capacity barrier,
drives
higher than this capacity have adopted a 48-bit addressing system which
can be supported in newer computer systems with updated controller
chips, BIOS codes, and operating system
drivers (refer to your system documentation for more details). If your
system does not support drives of this size, you have a few options.

Solution 1:
Western Digital has included a controller card and drivers in many
of our retail packaged drives that are greater than 137GB to address
this operating system and BIOS limitation. During installation, drives
larger than 137GB must be attached to the controller card and the
drivers for your operating system must be loaded properly to avoid the
risk of data loss. If you need a controller card, please visit our
Online Store.

Solution 2:
If the BIOS of your motherboard or controller card supports the
drive but Windows does not, see Answer ID 928.



32GB Barrier:
Some BIOSs released before June 1999 stall with drives larger than 32GB.
If you are
installing a drive larger than 32GB and your system stalls before floppy
or drive boot can take place, you may have a system BIOS that is
incompatible with larger drives. The solutions below should be followed
only if your system stalls when adding a drive larger than 32GB.

Solution 1 (recommended):
Contact your system or motherboard manufacturer for a BIOS upgrade
or use an EIDE controller card.

Solution 2:
If you are using Windows 98/ME, use the alternate Jumper Settings
and Data Lifeguard Tools 10 to install your drive. For instructions, see
Answer ID 567.

Solution 3:
If you had setup your drive using the Data Lifeguard Tools 11
option, Set Hard Drive Size and the system BIOS is displaying the size
of your drive as less than the full capacity, please see Answer ID 1157

Note: Windows 95 does not properly support drives larger than 32GB
without a high probability for data corruption. For more information,
see Answer ID 134.


8.4GB Barrier:
There is an 8.4GB drive limitation on some traditional system BIOSs. To
access the full capacity of 8.4GB and larger drives, your system BIOS
must support extended BIOS functions, and your operating system must
recognize extended BIOS functions. It is difficult to determine if your
system BIOS supports 8.4GB or larger drives. Please contact your system
or motherboard manufacturer for this information.

The following operating systems support extended BIOS functions.

* Windows 98 and Windows 98 Second Edition

* Windows ME

* Windows NT with Service Pack 4 or later

* Windows 2000

* Windows XP

The following operating systems do not support extended BIOS functions.

* DOS 6.xx and earlier

* Windows 3.1x

* Windows NT

* Novell NetWare

* OS/2 Warp

This article describes the Microsoft Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1)
48-bit Logical Block Addressing (LBA) support for ATA Packet Interface
(ATAPI) disk drives that can increase the capacity of your hard disk to
greater than the current 137 gigabyte (GB) limit.

Note Windows XP does not support 48-bit LBA support unless you are
running Windows XP Service Pack 1 (SP1). If you want to enable 48-bit
LBA support, you must apply Windows XP SP1 or later. Windows XP Media
Center Edition and Windows XP Tablet PC Edition already include SP1.

For additional information about the latest service pack for Windows XP,
click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft
Knowledge Base:

322389 How to obtain the latest Windows XP service pack
MORE INFORMATION
Windows XP SP1 includes 48-bit LBA support for ATAPI disk drives. With
this support, you can use hard disks that are larger than the current
137 GB limit. By default, support is enabled in SP1. To determine if you
are running SP1, right-click My Computer and then click Properties. On
the General tab, Service Pack 1 will be listed under "System."

To determine if you have the latest ATAPI driver, verify that the
version of Atapi.sys in your %systemroot%\system32\drivers folder is
version 5.1.2600.1135 (or version 5.1.2600.1152 for Windows XP 64-Bit
Edition) or later. To do this, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, click Search, and then click All Files and Folders.
2. Type Atapi.sys, and then click Search.
3. If you do not find the Atapi.sys file in your
%systemroot%\system32\Drivers folder, click More advanced options in
Search Companion, click Search hidden files and folders, and then repeat
step 2. For additional information about how to search for hidden and
system folders, click the following article number to view the article
in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

302347 How to search for hidden or system files in Windows XP
4. In your %systemroot%\System32\Drivers folder, Right-click
Atapi.sys, and then click Properties.
5. On the Version tab, note the file version.

If Atapi.sys is not version 5.1.2600.1135 (or version 5.1.2600.1152 for
Windows XP 64-Bit Edition), obtain and install the hotfix that is
described in Microsoft Knowledge Base article 331958. For additional
information about this hotfix, click the following article number to
view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

331958 Hard disk may become corrupted when entering standby or
hibernation or when writing a memory dump
By default, the original release of Windows XP Home Edition and Windows
XP Professional do not have 48-bit LBA support enabled.

You must meet the following requirements to use 48-bit LBA ATAPI support:

* You must have a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS.
* You must have a hard disk that has a capacity that is greater
than 137 GB.
* You must have Windows XP SP1 installed.

For the original release of Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP
Professional, 48-bit LBA can be enabled for testing purposes by setting
a registry value, named EnableBigLba, to 1 in the following registry subkey:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Atapi\Parameters\
Warning Data corruption may occur if either of the following conditions
is true:

* You use this registry value to enable 48-bit LBA support in the
original release of Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional.
* You install an earlier version of Windows, such as Windows 2000
or earlier, on a disk partition that was previously created by a 48-bit
aware operating system, such as Windows XP SP1, and that disk partition
is equal to or larger than the current addressable limit of 137 GB.

Note: The previous registry setting is ignored in Windows XP SP1 and
later. If you try to enable the 48-bit LBA ATAPI support in the original
release of Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional by editing
the previous registry setting and you did not meet the minimum
requirements, you may see the following behaviors:

* The registry value EnableBigLba is disabled. If you have a 48-bit
compatible BIOS that can support a hard disk that has a capacity that is
greater than 137 GB, only the first 137 GB of the hard disk are
addressable. The rest of the hard disk is not used.
* The registry value EnableBigLba is enabled, but you do not have a
48-bit LBA compatible BIOS and the capacity of the hard disk is not
greater than 137 GB.

If you enable the 48-bit LBA ATAPI support by editing the
registry setting, but you lack both a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS and a
hard disk that has a capacity that is see comment than 137 GB, you have
not changed the system. The hard disk continues to function as a
standard hard disk.
* The registry value EnableBigLba is enabled without a 48-bit LBA
compatible BIOS, but you have a hard disk with a capacity that is larger
than 137 GB.

If you enable 48-bit ATAPI support in the registry and you have a
hard disk that has a capacity that is see comment than 137 GB, but you
do not have a 48-bit LBA compatible BIOS, only the first 137 GB of the
hard disk are addressable. The remainder of the hard disk is not used.

To enable 48-bit LBA support by using an unattended installation with
the Microsoft System Preparation (Sysprep) tool, follow these steps:

1. Copy the following text into Microsoft Windows Notepad and save
the text as the 48bitLba.inf file:

[version]
signature="$CHICAGO$"
SetupClass=BASE


[DefaultInstall]
AddReg=48bitlba.Add.Reg

[48bitlba.Add.Reg]
HKLM,"System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Atapi\Parameters","EnableBigLba",0x10001,1

2. Create a file named Cmdlines.txt that includes the following lines:

[Commands]
"rundll32 setupapi,InstallHinfSection DefaultInstall 128
..\48BITLBA.INF"
3. Locate the Sysprep\I386 folder in the Sysprep image, and then
create a $OEM$ subfolder in this folder.
4. Copy the 48bitlba.inf and Cmdlines.txt files into the
Sysprep\I386\$OEM$ folder.
5. In your Sysprep.inf file, add a key named InstallFilesPath to the
[Unattended] section. This key must have the following value:
InstallFilesPath = "C:\sysprep\i386"

To add the previous settings to the Images folder, which had been
created with the Riprep.exe program, follow these steps:

1. On the remote installation server that contains the Riprep image,
create a Sysprep\I386\$OEM$ folder in the following folder:


RemoteInstall\Setup\Language\Images\Riprep_dir_name\I386\Mirror1\UserData

Note The word "Language" in the previous path reads "English" for
the English language, and "Riprep_dir_name" is the unique name that you
selected for the Riprep image.
2. Copy the 48bitlba.inf and Cmdlines.txt files into the $OEM$ folder.
3. Modify the Riprep.sif file in the
RemoteInstall\Setup\Language\Images\Riprep_dir_name\I386\Templates\Riprep.sif
folder (in addition to any other template files for this Riprep image
that you may have created), and then add the OemPreinstall and
InstallFilesPath values so that they are set up as:

[Unattended]
OemPreinstall = "Yes"
InstallFilesPath = "C:\sysprep\i386"
4. Close, and then save the file.

OEMs can turn on this support by using the Microsoft Windows OEM
Preinstallation Kit.

For more information, see the OEM Preinstallation Kit or the following
Microsoft Web site:

http://www.microsoft.com/oem