[SOLVED] It is normal for i7-4790k to stay at 1.25v without overclocking it?

May 23, 2020
30
0
30
0
As the title says, It is normal for i7-4790k to stay at 1.25v without overclocking it?
I think this is the problem why i hit in games 100C
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
I have it from my previous CPU an i5-4660.
Intel does not list an i5-4660, so you're instead most likely referring to the i5-4460.

The i5-4460 is an 84 Watt TDP processor that's boxed with Intel's PCG 2013D 95 Watt TDP cooler.

Intel's Product Specifications website lists all processors and their specified coolers. If you click on the red links then scroll down to "Package Specifications", you'll see the PCG 2013D stock cooler.

The i7-4790K is an 88 Watt TDP processor that's also boxed with the same PCG 2013D 95 Watt cooler.

The 2013D 95 Watt cooler has a copper center that's visible from the bottom, which distinguishes it from the 2013C 65 Watt counterpart that's all aluminum.

Intel's stock coolers are notorious for causing high Core temperatures due to their problematic push-pins popping loose from the motherboard. It's highly probable that your temperature problem is due to a loose push-pin.

However, if the cooler and push-pins are properly secured, then gaming shouldn't push Core temperatures to 100°C, which is Throttle temperature. Only certain stress tests and transcoding software can push the highest Core temperatures.

The stock cooler was never really adequate for the 4790K. Replacing the stock cooler with at least a mid-range aftermarket cooler that has a back plate and proper fastening hardware is always a smart choice. Your 4790K remains an excellent 4 Core 8 Thread processor, especially when overclocked, and is the fastest 4th generation mainstream CPU. It still compares very well to the 6700K.

Since the Noctua NH-D15 is the top-of-the-line air cooler, it will most certainly solve the problem. Until you receive your new cooler, I would check for a loose push-pin. Perform a close visual inspection with a strong light. Carefully compare each each push-pin to its neighbors. All should protrude equally from the back of the motherboard. Any pin that differs even slightly is suspect.

Regardless of whatever cooler is seated on the CPU, you're probably running Vcore in "Auto", which applies considerably more voltage than necessary to maintain stability. If you reconfigure BIOS for manual Vcore with either adaptive or offset options, you can significantly decrease Core temperatures. Most overclocking guides explain how, whether you intend to overclock or not.

Nevertheless, your new NH-D15 will definitely allow you to overclock quite nicely. Provided that you you want to do so, and have a Z87 or Z97 motherboard, then you can push for the highest stable overclock you can reach without exceeding 1.300 Vcore or 80°C. The 4790K is a great overclocker, so you should be able to achieve very good results. 4.6 to 4.8 GHz on all Cores is typical, with some even reaching 4.9.

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
May 23, 2020
30
0
30
0
If you are running Asus' Multi Core Enhancement, or some other 3rd party controlled 'Gaming Mode'?
The cpu at stock operation dynamically adjusts it's frequency and voltage.
I am not running any 3rd party program or controlled gaming mode or asus multi core enchancement, in game is going at 1.25v and i heard that this voltage is overclock voltage but i didnt overclock it. And when it hits 1.25v i have heat issues, it goes at 85C sometimes even 100C
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

Champion
Moderator
This is a normal voltage for a 4790K when it's using the normal turbo.

If you're having temperature issues with this CPU at 1.25V, then the problem is, 99 times out of 100, an inadequate/non-functioning cooling system or an inadequate installation of the cooling system.
 
May 23, 2020
30
0
30
0
This is a normal voltage for a 4790K when it's using the normal turbo.

If you're having temperature issues with this CPU at 1.25V, then the problem is, 99 times out of 100, an inadequate/non-functioning cooling system or an inadequate installation of the cooling system.
Yeah i have a stock cooler on the cpu, i'll get in 2 days a Noctua NH-D15, hope the temperature issue will get fixed.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
I have it from my previous CPU an i5-4660.
Intel does not list an i5-4660, so you're instead most likely referring to the i5-4460.

The i5-4460 is an 84 Watt TDP processor that's boxed with Intel's PCG 2013D 95 Watt TDP cooler.

Intel's Product Specifications website lists all processors and their specified coolers. If you click on the red links then scroll down to "Package Specifications", you'll see the PCG 2013D stock cooler.

The i7-4790K is an 88 Watt TDP processor that's also boxed with the same PCG 2013D 95 Watt cooler.

The 2013D 95 Watt cooler has a copper center that's visible from the bottom, which distinguishes it from the 2013C 65 Watt counterpart that's all aluminum.

Intel's stock coolers are notorious for causing high Core temperatures due to their problematic push-pins popping loose from the motherboard. It's highly probable that your temperature problem is due to a loose push-pin.

However, if the cooler and push-pins are properly secured, then gaming shouldn't push Core temperatures to 100°C, which is Throttle temperature. Only certain stress tests and transcoding software can push the highest Core temperatures.

The stock cooler was never really adequate for the 4790K. Replacing the stock cooler with at least a mid-range aftermarket cooler that has a back plate and proper fastening hardware is always a smart choice. Your 4790K remains an excellent 4 Core 8 Thread processor, especially when overclocked, and is the fastest 4th generation mainstream CPU. It still compares very well to the 6700K.

Since the Noctua NH-D15 is the top-of-the-line air cooler, it will most certainly solve the problem. Until you receive your new cooler, I would check for a loose push-pin. Perform a close visual inspection with a strong light. Carefully compare each each push-pin to its neighbors. All should protrude equally from the back of the motherboard. Any pin that differs even slightly is suspect.

Regardless of whatever cooler is seated on the CPU, you're probably running Vcore in "Auto", which applies considerably more voltage than necessary to maintain stability. If you reconfigure BIOS for manual Vcore with either adaptive or offset options, you can significantly decrease Core temperatures. Most overclocking guides explain how, whether you intend to overclock or not.

Nevertheless, your new NH-D15 will definitely allow you to overclock quite nicely. Provided that you you want to do so, and have a Z87 or Z97 motherboard, then you can push for the highest stable overclock you can reach without exceeding 1.300 Vcore or 80°C. The 4790K is a great overclocker, so you should be able to achieve very good results. 4.6 to 4.8 GHz on all Cores is typical, with some even reaching 4.9.

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: Phaaze88
May 23, 2020
30
0
30
0
Intel does not list an i5-4660, so you're instead most likely referring to the i5-4460.

The i5-4460 is an 84 Watt TDP processor that's boxed with Intel's PCG 2013D 95 Watt TDP cooler.

Intel's Product Specifications website lists all processors and their specified coolers. If you click on the red links then scroll down to "Package Specifications", you'll see the PCG 2013D stock cooler.

The i7-4790K is an 88 Watt TDP processor that's also boxed with the same PCG 2013D 95 Watt cooler.

The 2013D 95 Watt cooler has a copper center that's visible from the bottom, which distinguishes it from the 2013C 65 Watt counterpart that's all aluminum.

Intel's stock coolers are notorious for causing high Core temperatures due to their problematic push-pins popping loose from the motherboard. It's highly probable that your temperature problem is due to a loose push-pin.

However, if the cooler and push-pins are properly secured, then gaming shouldn't push Core temperatures to 100°C, which is Throttle temperature. Only certain stress tests and transcoding software can push the highest Core temperatures.

The stock cooler was never really adequate for the 4790K. Replacing the stock cooler with at least a mid-range aftermarket cooler that has a back plate and proper fastening hardware is always a smart choice. Your 4790K is still an excellent Quad Core, especially when overclocked, and is the fastest 4th generation mainstream CPU. It still compares very well to the 6700K.

Since the Noctua NH-D15 is the top-of-the-line air cooler, it will most certainly solve the problem. Until you receive your new cooler, I would check for a loose push-pin. Perform a close visual inspection with a strong light. Carefully compare each each push-pin to its neighbors. All should protrude equally from the back of the motherboard. Any pin that differs even slightly is suspect.

Regardless of whatever cooler is seated on the CPU, you're probably running Vcore in "Auto", which applies considerably more voltage than necessary to maintain stability. If you reconfigure BIOS for manual Vcore with either adaptive or offset options, you can significantly decrease Core temperatures. Most overclocking guides explain how, whether you intend to overclock or not.

Nevertheless, your new NH-D15 will definitely allow you to overclock quite nicely. Provided that you have a Z87 or Z97 motherboard and want to do so, then don't exceed 1.300 Vcore. The 4790K is typically a great overclocker, so you should be able to achieve very good results.

CT :sol:
Yea i wanted to say i5-4460, thanks for the advice! Have a good day sir!
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY