Question I've done everything I know and my computer still won't turn on.

tyler.slagboom

Prominent
Feb 8, 2019
5
0
510
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old system:
CPU / I5-6600k
MOBO / MSI Z170 Krait Gaming 3X
Memory / DDR4-3200
GPU / RTX 3070
PSU / Corsair RM650X

new system
CPU / I7-9700k
MOBO / Gigabyte Auros Elite Z390
Memory / DDR4-3200
GPU / RTX 3070
PSU / Corsair RM750X


About a week and a half ago, I got my I7 and my new motherboard to upgrade my computer. After putting it together with the old power supply (650 watts), I turned on the power, but the mobo lights flashed for half a second then shut off. Turning it off/on right afterwards did nothing, but if I waited around 30 seconds to turn it back on, then I would get another flash. I figured it was a dead cpu, so I put my old computer back together and well, the old computer doesn't turn on either. I have rebuilt both of my systems multiple times, as well as resetting my CMOS on both motherboards multiple times. I have done the paperclip test on both of my power supplies and they both work, I'm just extremely confused as to what might have happened. I have also been grounded at all times when working on it. Any help or suggestions would be helpful, school just started back up for me and I kind of need this thing for my computer science class. I'm working on a <Mod Edit> laptop right now but it is definitely not good. Thank you for any replies.
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
TRIPLE check EVERY SINGLE THING at the following link, even IF you THINK you already have. 90% of these kinds of issues end up being something you overlooked that was so obvious you would never think of it.

 

tyler.slagboom

Prominent
Feb 8, 2019
5
0
510
0
TRIPLE check EVERY SINGLE THING at the following link, even IF you THINK you already have. 90% of these kinds of issues end up being something you overlooked that was so obvious you would never think of it.

Checked it all, and still nothing. I can post a video of it if that would help. At this point, my only real idea is that I maybe shorted both of my motherboards... really hoping that's not the case though.
 
I have no idea why but both Asus and Gigabyte website are not reachable here for me so I cannot look on them.

Doesn't the Z390 need a certain BIOS version for that CPU to be supported? I'd like to check but I can't.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That's 100% true, but if it's actually a NEW motherboard, purchased from a primary, first tier retailer, it would be incredibly unlikely for it to come with an older BIOS version. Then again, things have gotten scarce and there are many sellers pulling stock out of back rooms to satisfy orders so you never know.

About the only way you're going to know on that is to either get a cheap 8th Gen CPU to try in it, or borrow one from somebody, or take it to a repair shop or PC service that can update the BIOS for you, if in fact it is not a board problem. I'm leaning towards this probably being the issue too, but again, it's pretty late in the game for it to have come with a version too old to support those 9th gen SKUs.
 
Reactions: Nemesia

boju

Titan
Ambassador
Yeah true. If wherever the motherboard was bought from has high volume turn around there shouldn't be an issue with old stock and also to keep exchange rate consistent with product inventory. Old stock should have left the site long ago.
 

tyler.slagboom

Prominent
Feb 8, 2019
5
0
510
0
Thank you all for your responses, and sorry I haven't responded sooner. About the BIOS questions, that wouldn't be affecting both of my systems. While it could certainly explain why my new motherboard/cpu won't work, it doesn't explain why my old motherboard/cpu no longer work either. I'm getting a PSU load tester to see if I somehow have two dead PSU's and if that still doesn't do anything, then I'll probably be back again.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You don't need a "PSU load tester". Just go to any harbor freight, walmart or local hardware store and get a cheap digital volt/ohm meter (multimeter) or analog volt meter, usually for anywhere from five to twenty bucks, or borrow one from somebody if you don't have one or can't buy one. Much less expensive than a purpose built tester that honestly won't give you any meaningful usability after you test one PSU, unless you happen to run into the same problem again. A volt meter gives you a LOT of useful scenarios from your car, to your house, to electronics, etc.

Below are full instructions on testing your PSU using a volt meter.

 

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