Ivy Bridge to Have a Maximum TDP of 77 Watts

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jacobdrj

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Well that is disheartening: How can I use my CPU as a space heater this winter if intel keeps lowering their desktop TDPs?...

Guess I have to get a new Dual GPU video card with a 1.5 KW PSU to make up the difference...

What a shame :(
 

Zagen30

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Mobo backwards compatibility? From Intel? I'm surprised. Yes, not everything's compatible, and there's catches with everything else, but when's the last time there was any backwards compatibility in an Intel product?

The lower TDP is impressive. I wonder how much power IB will use.
 

ben850

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Stupid question: Is Ivy Bridge supposed to be an upgrade to Sandy Bridge? Or is it strictly for low-powered applications?
 
early info, but looks very promising. here's hoping intel doesn't pull a cougar point or a bulldozer(more unlikely).
the leak doesn't seem to share much about ivb's igp which is rumored to be a big upgrade from hd3000.
configurable tdp is very welcome. will make those cpus even more power efficient.
i guess the backward compatibility is a result of intel putting less emphasis on desktop(still impressive) and more on laptop, ultrabooks, portables.
 

amk-aka-Phantom

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The Z68, P67, H67 and H61 chipsets look to all be compatible with a required UEFI update (this can be seen by recent announcements of motherboard makers coming out the PCIe Gen 3 support, which require the Ivy Bridge CPU).
IN YOUR FACE AMD! Who drops sockets all the time now, huh? And that max TDP... in your face as well!
 

soccerdocks

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[citation][nom]ben850[/nom]Stupid question: Is Ivy Bridge supposed to be an upgrade to Sandy Bridge? Or is it strictly for low-powered applications?[/citation]

Its an update. It will be faster than sandy bridge.
 

balister

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[citation][nom]ben850[/nom]Stupid question: Is Ivy Bridge supposed to be an upgrade to Sandy Bridge? Or is it strictly for low-powered applications?[/citation]

It's the die shrink from 32nm to 22nm. The new architechture will be the one after Ivy Bridge.
 

Thunderfox

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[citation][nom]Anontmouse of Singapore[/nom]I dont give a shit about intel give me some bulldozer news.[/citation]

THIS JUST IN: BULLDOZER SUCKS.
 

theconsolegamer

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[citation][nom]ben850[/nom]Stupid question: Is Ivy Bridge supposed to be an upgrade to Sandy Bridge? Or is it strictly for low-powered applications?[/citation]Better power efficiency, better internal graphics, smaller form factor.... take a guess! =)
 

amk-aka-Phantom

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LOL! APUs are a totally different market and I hope Intel rolls over AMD's APUs at some point just for the hell of it - they can afford it!
 

milktea

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[citation][nom]makaveli316[/nom]"The Z68, P67, H67 and H61 chipsets look to all be compatible with a required UEFI update" Where's the catch?[/citation]
It looks like the older chipsets would not have USB 3.0 support. :(
 

2late2die

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Looks interesting, but I hope Intel doesn't continue the current i7/5 trend of pricing i7 40-50% more for a 5-10% performance improvement over i5.
 

zanny

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[citation][nom]species8472[/nom]AMD had better pull a rabbit out of its hat soon or Intel will stagnate.[/citation]

That IS the rabbit. When Amd released the Athlon 64 line Intel was stagnant on the Pentium 4 line and had not innovated since Pentium 2 was the colossal success it was.

The problem with Intel is they now have this huge refinement process that they have planned out until 2016, with the tick-tock cycle. They have teams and such commited to each new step of their evolution until the end of the decade, so its unlikely they will slow down and lay people off to not push the tech. They probably learned when they had to adopt AMDs 64 bit instruction set that they can't give them headroom.

Its good for the industry to have AMD competitive, but for the time being everyone is winning because Intel is trying to avoid another multi core / 64 bit disaster like at the turn of the century.
 

zanny

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Should also mention, AMD is innovating on one front - they are pushing the core envelope in a way Intel isn't. It seems Ivy Bridge will still be a line of quad cores. If AMD gets a 16 core high end CPU that clocks as high as Bulldozer they would beat any quad core offering Intel could put out. So hopefully that gets Intel shoving more cores on the die.
 

soccerdocks

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[citation][nom]Zanny[/nom]That IS the rabbit. When Amd released the Athlon 64 line Intel was stagnant on the Pentium 4 line and had not innovated since Pentium 2 was the colossal success it was. The problem with Intel is they now have this huge refinement process that they have planned out until 2016, with the tick-tock cycle. They have teams and such commited to each new step of their evolution until the end of the decade, so its unlikely they will slow down and lay people off to not push the tech. They probably learned when they had to adopt AMDs 64 bit instruction set that they can't give them headroom.Its good for the industry to have AMD competitive, but for the time being everyone is winning because Intel is trying to avoid another multi core / 64 bit disaster like at the turn of the century.[/citation]

I was just about to say that. If you look at what Intel has planned for the future (even the little information that is publicly available) you can see that they will be making more significant advances. These things have been planned for years and will not change because AMD does not have a competing processor. The only thing that may happen is that the new processors will be delayed by a few months and be $20-50 more expensive, but I'm not even sure that will happen.
 

ben850

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[citation][nom]balister[/nom]It's the die shrink from 32nm to 22nm. The new architechture will be the one after Ivy Bridge.[/citation]

I'm currently on a Phenom II x4 am2+ build. Assuming I want to ditch AMD, what would you recommend for an Intel build? I don't want to spend more than 400$ on the mobo/cpu and I can wait probably a year before truly requiring an upgrade..

The i5-2500K seems like the sweet spot but I also am clearly not educated on what Intel has on it's horizon :p
 
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