[SOLVED] Just Bought an XFX 590 Fatboy... now I have heating concerns

May 26, 2019
5
0
10
0
Recently I bought the RX 590 Fatboy, and now I have some concerns. The temp is high for GPUs, which I knew before buying it, but the CPU is now having high heat due to being right above it. The card on World War Z Ultra settings was performing great at 101 fps average, with around 78 degrees celcius, which I knew the card would do upon buying it. However, the cpu was averaging 76 degrees celcius, no higher, no less. Should this be a concern? (My cpu is the intel core i7 4790.)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Are you using the stock CPU cooler?

What case and how many case fans?

Where is each case fan located and in what orientation (Intake or exhaust) is each case fan?

If you do not exceed 80°C under a full load, then your CPU thermal compliance is fine. Regardless of what graphics card you have, even an R9 290x2 which is an extremely hot card, you should not see any substantial increase in CPU temps so long as you have adequate case airflow and a decent CPU cooler. Stock cooler, not so much.
 
May 26, 2019
5
0
10
0
Are you using the stock CPU cooler?

What case and how many case fans?

Where is each case fan located and in what orientation (Intake or exhaust) is each case fan?

If you do not exceed 80°C under a full load, then your CPU thermal compliance is fine. Regardless of what graphics card you have, even an R9 290x2 which is an extremely hot card, you should not see any substantial increase in CPU temps so long as you have adequate case airflow and a decent CPU cooler. Stock cooler, not so much.
I am currently using the stock cooler; my case is the AZZA Cosmas 208, a very basic case but it has a fan in the bottom front, one in the back (a normal exhaust fan), and one on the top, right above both the CPU and GPU. All are set to be outwards exhaust, no cool air being pulled in. I did this cause I didn't want the rear exhaust fan to bring cool air in but make a pocket of hot air in the front of the case. (Link to case: http://www.azzatek.com/m/2010-1275-122656.php?Lang=en )
 
May 26, 2019
5
0
10
0
No concerns here.

GPU temps are normal, cpu temps are normal. Unless youer are often getting into the mid 80s on your CPU/GPU you shouldn't worry.
Awesome. I wasn't too worried seeing as the fans weren't at 100%, and the intel tuning tool was saying 'no' under the 'thermal throttling' dialog.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That's TOTALLY wrong. No wonder you have temperature problems. Flip your front fan around as an intake. Front and bottom fans should ALWAYS (99.99999% of the time anyhow) be oriented as intake fans and top or rear fans should always be oriented as exhaust unless you have a top mounted AIO radiator configured as intake (Which I don't agree with, but some do it anyhow) or a case with a top mounted PSU.

Your reasoning for not having an intake fan is not sensible. I've never heard of such a thing before and I work extensively with PC cooling systems and designs. You NEED to have both intake and exhaust fans. The CPU and GPU card coolers are doing practically nothing without cool ambient air to work with.

So make sure the rear and top fans are blowing out, and the front fan is blowing in. Without that intake fan bringing in cool air, your GPU and CPU coolers are trying to cool the system with hot air, and the only air coming in is whatever can make it's way in through the cracks and gaps in the case. Totally not right. You'll probably see a five to ten degree drop in temps just by doing that. Installing a second front intake fan would help greatly as well. Maybe a full ten to fifteen degree drop in temps and assuredly a drop in average non-peak temperatures.

You'd be better off with no fan installed at all in front than having three fans all configured as exhaust with one of them being in the front blocking one of the main sources of airflow through the negative pressure created by the rear and top exhaust fans.

Turn it around. Should be like this.



 
Reactions: TJ Hooker
May 26, 2019
5
0
10
0
Really? Because I have HUGE concerns about a system that averages 78°C. Idle temps should be more like 30-40°C, with the stock cooler.
Well Idle is around 35 - 40,I meant to say it was 76 degreesin the middle of an intense game. Trust me, I'd be concerned too if it was 76 while idle, thank you for the fan info too!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, that's good. But I would ABSOLUTELY, not consider, but DO, flip that front fan around as an intake. In 30 years of working on systems I've only one other time come across anybody using all fans as exhaust, and when corrected, that system dropped ten degrees peak temps instantly.
 
Reactions: Pisces2000
May 26, 2019
5
0
10
0
Yes, that's good. But I would ABSOLUTELY, not consider, but DO, flip that front fan around as an intake. In 30 years of working on systems I've only one other time come across anybody using all fans as exhaust, and when corrected, that system dropped ten degrees peak temps instantly.
Totally, I'm about to do that right now. Thankyou again! I do believe the front fan came default with the case / pre-installed. The website makes it sound like its an intake fan as well.
 

spencer.cleaves2

Upstanding
Jan 5, 2019
178
25
215
8
Almost every AMD GPU I've seen performs better with an under-volt on it as far as stability and heat. The cards have great performance, just not at stock settings. So why don't the just MAKE the under-volt the stock setting (I know this thread is solved and this wasn't the main issue but I see so many people with AMD cards throttling out of the box and thinking they got a bad card). They just need the cards to be a bit more user friendly out of the box.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Reducing voltage, on anything, CPU, memory, graphics card, etc., NEVER increases stability, UNLESS you have voltage increased SO FAR as to be unrealistic in any scenario. That kind of voltage can cause stability problems but of a different kind.

Within the allowable range for the hardware in question, higher voltage will ALWAYS provide more stability. That being said, I agree that they tend to overdo the voltage in order ERR on the side of stability, which is why you can often reduce voltage from stock configurations and still maintain an acceptable level of stability which has the added benefit of reducing thermals. But you won't ever increase stability by doing so, so that's totally inaccurate.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS