Question Just upgraded to a Radeon RX560, can nolonger see splash screen at boot

Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
This is for a HTPC. My old trusty Nvidia 430 finally crapped out. I wanted the quickest fix possible so off to Best Buy I went. I found they had the Radeon RX560 and it had good reviews and met (exceeded) my needs. Install went fine but occasionally I am getting blue screen crashes. This may or may not be related, I personally feel it's a memory and over heating from lack of space and air flow in my case. To be resolved another day. Anyway, I wanted to boot into BIOS to flash the latest FW and realized, I no longer see any splash screen at boot up. I also can't get to the BIOS. I am running all my video through HDMI and I can only assume it's because whatever video it needs to display the screen through the HDMI is not running until full boot. If this is the case, why did my Nvdia not have this issue and is there a way to set the Radeon to not do this? I assume the only potential work around is to get a basic VGA monitor and see if that will give me basic video.

Thoughts?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What are your full hardware specifications for this HTPC including motherboard, CPU, memory and EXACT model of power supply?

I would highly recommend that you do a hard reset of the BIOS, which will reset the hardware tables and may instantly solve your problems. And it may not, but often when a new graphics card is installed it is necessary to do a hard reset. Sometimes just doing a CMOS reset using the jumper pins is not enough. In rarer cases even just removing the CMOS battery and putting it back in isn't enough. It's worth trying as a starting point.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
What are your full hardware specifications for this HTPC including motherboard, CPU, memory and EXACT model of power supply?

I would highly recommend that you do a hard reset of the BIOS, which will reset the hardware tables and may instantly solve your problems. And it may not, but often when a new graphics card is installed it is necessary to do a hard reset. Sometimes just doing a CMOS reset using the jumper pins is not enough. In rarer cases even just removing the CMOS battery and putting it back in isn't enough. It's worth trying as a starting point.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
I just realized I posted this with my new account, I was locked out of my old one and there I used to have all my specs listed in my sig. I'm mobile now, I'll post back in the morning.

I have to ask though; what would the PSU model have to do with anything?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The PSU has EVERYTHING to do with EVERYTHING. There is nothing, on ANY system, that doesn't 300% fully rely on the power supply. There are NO problems, ZERO, that can occur with any piece of hardware that can't be mimicked by a problem with the power supply. Anything that can go wrong, can SEEM to be wrong as well, when a power supply is weak, failing or has other problems such as being underpowered. Even a unit with poor voltage regulation or high ripple can cause hardware to malfunction or intermittently show problems.

Your new graphics card uses FAR more power than your old one. That GT 430 only needed a halfway decent 330w power supply. Your RX 560 has a recommendation for at least a 400w unit. Not a major difference but depending on your PSU model and what kind of actual capacity it can sustain, it could definitely be relevant. Under non-Windows environments like during POST or in the BIOS, things like the CPU and graphics card tend to use more power until they get into a Windows driver framework environment where power is reduced while not under a load. I've seen stranger things that's for sure. When it comes to power supplies, ANYTHING is possible.

Does that mean it IS the problem? Of course not, but it's always a good idea to KNOW exactly what hardware you are dealing with so you don't end up chasing ghosts for no reason at all, when something specifically basic could be determined early on.

I would try the hard reset, and I also will agree with your idea that a different type of video input or display might be the ticket as far as getting into the BIOS screens.

What OS are you running on this HTPC?
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
The PSU has EVERYTHING to do with EVERYTHING. There is nothing, on ANY system, that doesn't 300% fully rely on the power supply. There are NO problems, ZERO, that can occur with any piece of hardware that can't be mimicked by a problem with the power supply. Anything that can go wrong, can SEEM to be wrong as well, when a power supply is weak, failing or has other problems such as being underpowered. Even a unit with poor voltage regulation or high ripple can cause hardware to malfunction or intermittently show problems.

Your new graphics card uses FAR more power than your old one. That GT 430 only needed a halfway decent 330w power supply. Your RX 560 has a recommendation for at least a 400w unit. Not a major difference but depending on your PSU model and what kind of actual capacity it can sustain, it could definitely be relevant. Under non-Windows environments like during POST or in the BIOS, things like the CPU and graphics card tend to use more power until they get into a Windows driver framework environment where power is reduced while not under a load. I've seen stranger things that's for sure. When it comes to power supplies, ANYTHING is possible.

Does that mean it IS the problem? Of course not, but it's always a good idea to KNOW exactly what hardware you are dealing with so you don't end up chasing ghosts for no reason at all, when something specifically basic could be determined early on.

I would try the hard reset, and I also will agree with your idea that a different type of video input or display might be the ticket as far as getting into the BIOS screens.

What OS are you running on this HTPC?
Ok, so I reset the BIOS, still not POST or splash screen. My PSU and other specs are as follows

PSU: Diablotek PDA-550BW (550W)
CPU: Intel i5-750 1156 2.7Ghz
RAM: 8Gb (4x2Gb) Corsair DDR3 1600MHz PC3-12800
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-P55A-UD3 (don't know if it's revision 1 or 2)
OS: Windows 10 Professional

If it matters, I am running 4 (2x 120mm, 2x 80mm) case fans off of the PSU and the CPU fan of course.

So obviously the PC still boots with the BIOS reset, but I still am not sure why I cannot boot to the BIOS. I would hate to go pick up a basic VGA monitor to see that it didn't work.

Any more thoughts?
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
To start with, Diablotek is one of the WORST not strictly generic brands of power supply you could get. They slot in right next to companies like Ultra, Raidmax, Logisys and Aerocool in terms of how bad their power supplies actually are. The fact that there are not only no reviews of that unit, but not even any forum entries from anybody discussing it on Jonny Guru or other PSU centric sites indicates to me an agreement that the unit in question doesn't even warrant discussion on the matter. Because if it did, even if there were no reviews, there WOULD be a discussion about it someplace on JG or here. Besides which, we already know based on their historical track record that for units that have been reviewed, Diablotek has consistently failed miserably.

The first thing I would recommend doing is replacing that unit with one that has at least halfway decent quality or if you really care about this system, one that actually HAS good quality. Please note, that Diablotek is and has been, on my list of "do not use under any circumstances", for a very long time.



I would definitely try a different video output such as Displayport, DVI or VGA if your card and your monitor support it. I'm not sure I'd buy a monitor to do it, but maybe see if you can borrow one from somebody OR get one for cheap, used, off Craigslist or another local classified etc.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
To start with, Diablotek is one of the WORST not strictly generic brands of power supply you could get. They slot in right next to companies like Ultra, Raidmax, Logisys and Aerocool in terms of how bad their power supplies actually are. The fact that there are not only no reviews of that unit, but not even any forum entries from anybody discussing it on Jonny Guru or other PSU centric sites indicates to me an agreement that the unit in question doesn't even warrant discussion on the matter. Because if it did, even if there were no reviews, there WOULD be a discussion about it someplace on JG or here. Besides which, we already know based on their historical track record that for units that have been reviewed, Diablotek has consistently failed miserably.

The first thing I would recommend doing is replacing that unit with one that has at least halfway decent quality or if you really care about this system, one that actually HAS good quality. Please note, that Diablotek is and has been, on my list of "do not use under any circumstances", for a very long time.



I would definitely try a different video output such as Displayport, DVI or VGA if your card and your monitor support it. I'm not sure I'd buy a monitor to do it, but maybe see if you can borrow one from somebody OR get one for cheap, used, off Craigslist or another local classified etc.
I built this HTPC like 11 years ago and that PSU have served me well since day one. I have l upgraded the motherboard to have USB 3.0 and doubled the RAM, aside from the aforementioned GPU. I have been wanting to get a more modular one to lessen the amount of cables in my case. As for the monitor., I used to always have an extra monitor in my work vehicle but I quit that job and moved across the country so not only do I not have it to use, I have no friends to loan me one. I am contemplating getting one cheap on marketplace or CL so I can run 2 monitors from my laptop since I am taking online classes and 2 monitors would help. So maybe I'll run out today and try to get one, there are a few pawn shops around me.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The fact that it is 11 years old AND a POS PSU to begin with, just compounds the problem, it doesn't exonerate it. You've been lucky, nothing more. And if you didn't have a unit that, on paper anyhow, was 220w above what that system actually called for with the GT 430 installed and had instead had a Diablotek unit that was closer to the actual recommendation, you almost certainly would have never made it past the warranty date.

More important though, you need to get the idea out of your head that it's ok to use a power supply that is that old. Even IF this was an incredibly fantastic unit from that era, such as the Seasonic X series or Corsair AX series, at ten years old, it would be WELL BEYOND the point at which it should have been replaced.

That Diablotek unit was a 3 year warranty part. Not five. Not ten. Three. At three to five years, IF it had been a quality unit which it is not, it should have been replaced. So at this point, it's neither surprising that you are having unexplained issues NOR would it be terribly surprising to me that perhaps your motherboard is now to blame for the problems you are having, or that your graphics card died, since you have been using a cheap, low quality model that has undoubtedly been bombarding your motherboard and graphics card capacitors with high levels of ripple for ten years.

Well, maybe not the motherboard since you say you replaced it, but it's still a consideration. Assuming you bought that board used since there haven't been any P55 motherboards manufactured in like at least seven years, I think there's at least a chance that the board is to blame. Did you try at all to get into the BIOS previously since replacing that board?

Have you tried replacing the CMOS battery? On a board that old, I'd defintely try to start with a fresh CMOS battery because that can cause any number of BIOS related issues and since a new CR2032 battery is only a few bucks, it's an easy option.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
The fact that it is 11 years old AND a POS PSU to begin with, just compounds the problem, it doesn't exonerate it. You've been lucky, nothing more. And if you didn't have a unit that, on paper anyhow, was 220w above what that system actually called for with the GT 430 installed and had instead had a Diablotek unit that was closer to the actual recommendation, you almost certainly would have never made it past the warranty date.

More important though, you need to get the idea out of your head that it's ok to use a power supply that is that old. Even IF this was an incredibly fantastic unit from that era, such as the Seasonic X series or Corsair AX series, at ten years old, it would be WELL BEYOND the point at which it should have been replaced.

That Diablotek unit was a 3 year warranty part. Not five. Not ten. Three. At three to five years, IF it had been a quality unit which it is not, it should have been replaced. So at this point, it's neither surprising that you are having unexplained issues NOR would it be terribly surprising to me that perhaps your motherboard is now to blame for the problems you are having, or that your graphics card died, since you have been using a cheap, low quality model that has undoubtedly been bombarding your motherboard and graphics card capacitors with high levels of ripple for ten years.

Well, maybe not the motherboard since you say you replaced it, but it's still a consideration. Assuming you bought that board used since there haven't been any P55 motherboards manufactured in like at least seven years, I think there's at least a chance that the board is to blame. Did you try at all to get into the BIOS previously since replacing that board?

Have you tried replacing the CMOS battery? On a board that old, I'd defintely try to start with a fresh CMOS battery because that can cause any number of BIOS related issues and since a new CR2032 battery is only a few bucks, it's an easy option.
I get what you are saying but I would reboot my HTPC at least once a week for whatever reasons and it wasn't until I put the new GPU in that notice nothing at boot, just a blank screen until my Windows login screen. I can only assume they are related. I just can't see blaming this on my PSU. Is my motherboard old and did I buy it used? Yes. I am all for the idea of getting a different PSU (mainly since it's been my list for a while). But I feel there is a bigger underlying issue why I am not seeing either my motherboard slash screen, or any of my POST details. Unless I am wrong.

Edit:

To add, if I upgrade my MB again, I will most certainly have to do the CPU too since 1156 is old architecture.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, everything you say is true, and I agree. But I ALWAYS try to get the FACTS surrounding any power supply out there when possible, when and if I know something about them, but mainly in general. Reading the recommendations at the link I gave you earlier might go a long way in helping to understand if you are fuzzy at all in that area.

Yes, if you buy additional hardware, it would make a lot of sense to go with a completely new platform.

For less than 300 bucks you could get something that not only blows doors on the performance of your current platform, but also has SATA III instead of II, which could obviously impact the performance of any media being read from that machine as well as it likely has only PCIe 2.0 instead of 3.0, so graphics performance could be limited as well although that's unlikely with a card of that caliber.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
Yes, if you buy additional hardware, it would make a lot of sense to go with a completely new platform.
Having just bought my new GPU which is PCI-E 2.0 I would hate to upgrade to a MB that requires 3.0, I am not 100% sure but isn't that the small slot? I am in negotiations with a person on MArketplace that has a whole gaming setup minus a GPU (perfect for me) for sale that far exceeds what I would ever need. I always knew if I replace my MB (again) I would need new RAM (again). So if I can find a prebuilt system that exceeds my current setup I that maybe what I need to just do.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
There is no "requires", plus your RX 560 IS a PCIe 3.0 card. Without any question. EVERY new architecture since at least 2012, probably late 2011 since the PCIe 3.0 standard was finalized in 2010.

Regardless, ALL motherboards that are PCIe 3.0 are backwards compatible with PCIe 2.0 graphics cards and other add in devices.

You can never find a quality prebuilt that is as capable as something you could assemble yourself, for the same price or less. You can get a prebuilt that costs less, or a prebuilt with better performance, but you can't get both, pretty much, ever. Not new anyhow, and generally, not used either. Not when compared to what you can do for the same price when choosing your own hardware AND you will end up with MUCH higher quality parts when you build you own than if you use an OEM system that skimps in many areas to cut costs. Remember, these companies are about profit margins, not high quality long endurance builds.
 
Reactions: Ptitifulbreak
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
There is no "requires", plus your RX 560 IS a PCIe 3.0 card. Without any question. EVERY new architecture since at least 2012, probably late 2011 since the PCIe 3.0 standard was finalized in 2010.

Regardless, ALL motherboards that are PCIe 3.0 are backwards compatible with PCIe 2.0 graphics cards and other add in devices.

You can never find a quality prebuilt that is as capable as something you could assemble yourself, for the same price or less. You can get a prebuilt that costs less, or a prebuilt with better performance, but you can't get both, pretty much, ever. Not new anyhow, and generally, not used either. Not when compared to what you can do for the same price when choosing your own hardware AND you will end up with MUCH higher quality parts when you build you own than if you use an OEM system that skimps in many areas to cut costs. Remember, these companies are about profit margins, not high quality long endurance builds.
Thanks. I was not not in the market right now to spend money on my HTPC, but I knew the time would come eventually.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
No worries. Let me know if you sort out your lack of BIOS access. I'm interested in knowing what the deal was. Good luck.
Hey it's me again.

So to add another weird issue. I decided I would use this as an excuse to do what I've been wanting to do for a while and that is to upgrade my PC. So I purchased a used AsRock FM2A88X- Extreme6+ motherboard w/ a AMD A1-7680K CPU and with 16 gigs of RAM in a Cool Master case and a 500w PSU. Sorry I forgot brand (Not Diablotek, that's for sure ;) ) So that should eliminate all the same hardware I had before that could potentially be causing problems, right? After installing my SSD with my previous Windows 10 image and loading all the appropriate drivers I of course had to reboot several times. The reason I chose this motherboard is because it had onboard HDMI and I figured I could return the new video card that I just purchased and get my money back to offset the cost of these new (used) parts. . Well not only have I not been able to get the onboard HDMI to work, which I am not giving up on, During those reboots I was able to see the splash screen while using the aforementioned Radeon GPU. Then poof, out of nowhere I have the same issue, a blank screen during boot. I at one time was able to boot with prompts for how to get into the BIOS and other start-up and have been in the BIOS. I was able to see the splash screen my first couple times booting up. This motherboard even has the newer BIOS that you can actually launch using an executable when you reboot. Even when I do that, it reboots but it never comes to ready, I can only assume it is in BIOS and the video is blank. I still plan to find an old VGA monitor to see f I can see it that way. But what the hell, how can this same thing be happening again? It's gotta be card related.

EDIT: So some more details. It is not like it's a blank screen, it is actually getting no video signal, all I see if the LG logo for my TV floating saying 'No Signal'. And I also proved it is indeed going into BIOS, I gave it some time and pressed F10 then enter to exit and it eventually booted.


Any more ideas? I am stumped.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Trying to use the same Windows installation that was used on a different system, with a different chipset and other core hardware on the motherboard such as storage controllers, rarely works. Sometimes if the chipsets are similar OR if the installation is fairly recent, it might, but usually it does not. In one way or another something always manages to be a problem and generally it's down to the fact that when windows recognizes the new hardware and installs the appropriate drivers it usually fails to properly clean up the registry and that results in one kind of trouble or another. Way more often than not.

So, if you change from one platform to another, especially if you go AMD to Intel or Intel to AMD, it is almost a NECESSITY that you do a clean install of Windows.

What is the brand and model of the PSU you have now. Keep in mind, the ratio of complete crap to halfway decent or good power supplies out there is about 90-1, so just because it's a different PSU and is 500w does not mean that it is any good. In fact, depending on what it is, it could be worse than what you had although we'll hold off on that judgement until we know since that Diablotek unit IS pretty crappy.

It does seem unusual to have the same problem though with different hardware. Are you using a power strip between the PSU and the wall outlet? Or a UPS battery backup? Or is your PSU plugged directly into the wall socket with nothing in between?

What is the model of the monitor you are trying to use? Have you tried a different display cable, or a different KIND of display output, or a different display whether another monitor or a tv or anything different that will connect?

A bad cable or monitor can still cause a "no signal".

Are you 200% certain that the graphics card is FULLY seated in the PCI slot and that the lock is engaged in the bottom of the card?
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
Trying to use the same Windows installation that was used on a different system, with a different chipset and other core hardware on the motherboard such as storage controllers, rarely works. Sometimes if the chipsets are similar OR if the installation is fairly recent, it might, but usually it does not. In one way or another something always manages to be a problem and generally it's down to the fact that when windows recognizes the new hardware and installs the appropriate drivers it usually fails to properly clean up the registry and that results in one kind of trouble or another. Way more often than not.

So, if you change from one platform to another, especially if you go AMD to Intel or Intel to AMD, it is almost a NECESSITY that you do a clean install of Windows.

What is the brand and model of the PSU you have now. Keep in mind, the ratio of complete crap to halfway decent or good power supplies out there is about 90-1, so just because it's a different PSU and is 500w does not mean that it is any good. In fact, depending on what it is, it could be worse than what you had although we'll hold off on that judgement until we know since that Diablotek unit IS pretty crappy.

It does seem unusual to have the same problem though with different hardware. Are you using a power strip between the PSU and the wall outlet? Or a UPS battery backup? Or is your PSU plugged directly into the wall socket with nothing in between?

What is the model of the monitor you are trying to use? Have you tried a different display cable, or a different KIND of display output, or a different display whether another monitor or a tv or anything different that will connect?

A bad cable or monitor can still cause a "no signal".

Are you 200% certain that the graphics card is FULLY seated in the PCI slot and that the lock is engaged in the bottom of the card?
I get the choice to do a fresh install, but I was trying every reason to not have to do that and not have to reconfigure everything again. So when I got it all working with no issues and no '❕' in Device Manager. It wasn't until I did a few reboots that the boot screen stopped showing. A quick google search indicates others have this issue too but no real answer why.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
Thanks for the link. It's not that I know how to do a clean install, I just don't want to. Lots to configure.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I understand, but that is what NEEDS to happen, whether you WANT to or not.

I can list about fifty threads here, and those are just the ones I've kept track of, where people felt exactly as you do but doing a clean install was the only thing that could resolve their issue when a platform change had occurred. But obviously, that is each persons choice. You can avoid doing it, and continue to have a system that doesn't work right, totally your prerogative, or you can bite the bullet and do a clean install and then install all the latest drivers from the motherboard and CPU manufacturer product pages and hopefully be done with it. I understand the desire to not have to do that, but sometimes, the only choice we are given is that there IS no choice.
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
I understand, but that is what NEEDS to happen, whether you WANT to or not.

I can list about fifty threads here, and those are just the ones I've kept track of, where people felt exactly as you do but doing a clean install was the only thing that could resolve their issue when a platform change had occurred. But obviously, that is each persons choice. You can avoid doing it, and continue to have a system that doesn't work right, totally your prerogative, or you can bite the bullet and do a clean install and then install all the latest drivers from the motherboard and CPU manufacturer product pages and hopefully be done with it. I understand the desire to not have to do that, but sometimes, the only choice we are given is that there IS no choice.
So an update. I picked up a cheap VGA monitor and got into the BIOS. I also finally got the onboard HDMI to work so I can return the Radeon 560 and get some cash back.

For now it all works as it should and if I need to get into the BIOS again I will just pull that monitor off the shelf. I just don't want to go through a full fresh install at this time.

Thanks for your help.
 
Likely what has happened is the BIOS initialization finished before the card and display output initialization did. There is handshaking and negotation with a startup video signal.

Stupid question but did you ever just tried hold down delete on power up to see if it would eventually go into bios?
 
Apr 11, 2019
20
0
10
0
Likely what has happened is the BIOS initialization finished before the card and display output initialization did. There is handshaking and negotation with a startup video signal.

Stupid question but did you ever just tried hold down delete on power up to see if it would eventually go into bios?
It goes into BIOS, it's just won't show the video. I know this because the screen is completely black (no no signal message) and it stays that way indefinitely. But if I hit F10 and the Enter as almost all BIOS commands will use as a way to exit, it will reboot to windows. But just like the BIOS, the screen is blank until windows loads. It's a HDMI issue since the same thing happens when using the onboard HDMI or the Radeon card's HDMI.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS