Question Kernels

shaharhada

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Jul 27, 2020
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One information source say that "there is no different" and in another say that "there is fundamentally different" between the two? Which is right?
 

shaharhada

Prominent
Jul 27, 2020
103
2
585
0
O.K. I can say the sources is one for Computer Manager support and the second is a Linux. These sources are private and you can't enter from outside. I think the second is more deep.
More question: is one operating system take think from the other?
The frist source say there is no difference from the presepective of the user. Can you answer me please: Why the second source say there is fundamental differences?
 
Can you answer me please: Why the second source say there is fundamental differences?
They're different in the philosophies that drive their design. Linux started off as a FOSS clone of MINIX, to put it very broadly. MINIX is a UNIX-like OS, so by association Linux follows how UNIX works. As mentioned, Windows NT was developed by the guy who developed VMS.

If there's another fundamental difference, it's how they run things. Linux uses a so-called monolithic kernel approach, meaning everything the OS needs to function like drivers and services, runs in the same memory space and security level as the kernel. Windows NT uses a so-called hybrid kernel approach, where some of the things the OS needs to function don't run in the same memory space and security level as the kernel.

The first source is probably saying "there is no difference" is because at the moment, enough of the feature sets of the Linux, Windows, and macOS kernels overlap that for all practical purposes, it doesn't matter which is being used. But this is also like saying "there's no difference between a Honda or a Ford car" if you consider you only need a vehicle to get from A to B.
 
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