Question Kingston A400 240GB temperatures

Jul 23, 2019
6
1
15
0
Nice to meet you all. I bough a new PC recently (20 days ago). It's an Intel i7-8700 assembled on a MSI B360 Gaming Pro Carbon. The power supply is a Bitfenix Plus Gold 650W, the HDD is a Seagate Barracuda 1TB and the SSD is a Kingston A400 240GB placed on the back of the MOBO. Oh! My case is a Nox Hummer ZX with three pre-installed fans of 120mm. The issue is that I'm getting temperatures close to 70ºC. According to CrystalDisk and Kingston software my SSD punctually got 72ºC. What about SSD Wear Indication at 99%? I have been using this SSD less than one month. I also did a stress benchmark (HeayLoad) for 25 minutes and HWiNFO64 registered these temps. Finally, I did CrystalDiskMark test. Room temperature is around 30ºC. Thanks and sorry if my english isn't very good, I'm learning the language. ^^"
 
It could be that the normalised value of the Wear Indication attribute is rounded down. If so, then this would imply that this number drops from 100 to 99 after the very first byte is written to the drive. I would wait until it drops to 98 before passing judgment.

The reported temperature would be the temperature of the controller die rather than the case environment. The datasheet specifies an operating range of 0C to 70degC.

https://www.kingston.com/datasheets/SA400S37_en.pdf

Edit: Your drive is a SA400S37/240G , according to the screenshot of your Kingston software. This is a 2.5" SATA model. Sorry, I was thinking about the NVMe version.

This photo clip shows an LM75B digital temperature sensor IC in the top right corner:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/hs-wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/12142624/A400_120-h07.jpg

Review of 120GB model (SA400S37/120G)
https://www.hardwaresecrets.com/kingston-a400-120-gib-ssd-review/2/

LM75B digital temperature sensor datasheet:
https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/data-sheet/LM75B.pdf

I can't understand how this air temperature sensor could be reporting 70degC ?!
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Satan-IR
Jul 23, 2019
6
1
15
0
It could be that the normalised value of the Wear Indication attribute is rounded down. If so, then this would imply that this number drops from 100 to 99 after the very first byte is written to the drive. I would wait until it drops to 98 before passing judgment.

The reported temperature would be the temperature of the controller die rather than the case environment. The datasheet specifies an operating range of 0C to 70degC.

https://www.kingston.com/datasheets/SA400S37_en.pdf

Edit: Your drive is a SA400S37/240G , according to the screenshot of your Kingston software. This is a 2.5" SATA model. Sorry, I was thinking about the NVMe version.

This photo clip shows an LM75B digital temperature sensor IC in the top right corner:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/hs-wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/12142624/A400_120-h07.jpg

Review of 120GB model (SA400S37/120G)
https://www.hardwaresecrets.com/kingston-a400-120-gib-ssd-review/2/

LM75B digital temperature sensor datasheet:
https://www.nxp.com/docs/en/data-sheet/LM75B.pdf

I can't understand how this air temperature sensor could be reporting 70degC ?!

Should I be worried? T_T
 
I don't know how an excessive temperature (72C) would affect the longevity of your drive. To be honest, I don't know whether I should be worried. However, I don't understand why the NVMe version of the same drive appears not to have a similar temperature sensor IC, which then begs the question, which chip is responsible for the SMART temperature attribute?

Kingston SA400M8 NVMe A400 SSD:

https://cdn-reichelt.de/bilder/web/xxl_ws/E600/SA400M8_120GB_02.png
https://cdn-reichelt.de/bilder/web/xxl_ws/E6aa00/SA400M8_120GB_01.png

Your Kingston CP33238B controller is actually a rebadged Phison PS3111-S11. Phison's datasheet specifies an operating temperature range of 0 - 70C:

https://www.phison.com/images/products_datasheet/Embedded-PS3111-S11T.pdf

If you can access the PCB without voiding your warranty, I would use my finger to test the temperatures of the controller and temperature sensor ICs. You could also see how the SMART report changes in response to cooling and heating these ICs.
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
Thing is you can't really know if it was at 72C for a second or not from those Kingston manager numbers. Unless you run other software and monitor it for longer periods of time. That min and max indicates it's not running at 72 C 24/7 but I'd say it shouldn't get that high at all.

Controller apart, I guess above 70 C the NAND would start to degrade faster and data corruption risk increases a lot. Of course fzakbar knows better.
 
All I know about temperature as it affects NAND is that the data retention period is reduced.

https://www.anandtech.com/show/9248/the-truth-about-ssd-data-retention
https://www.atpinc.com/blog/ssd-data-retention-temperature-thermal-throttling
https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/facebook-study-finds-no-correlation-between-ssd-reads-and-failure-rate/

The researchers found that it wasn’t usage, as is commonly believed, that wears down flash memory, but temperature that has the most effect on data integrity.
That said, all those articles are obviously referring to the temperature of the NAND flash array. This begs the question, which temperature is the SSD firmware reporting?
 
Reactions: Satan-IR

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS