[SOLVED] L shaped adapter for laptop power cords. Do they exist?

conticreative

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I mostly use my Dell Inspiron 13-7359 laptop plugged in even when working around the house. That means I have the power plug to the left always in danger of being pulled, bent, broken, etc.
I have never actually damaged my own laptop in this manner, but my wife has bricked a couple of laptops (one mine, one hers) and an iPad by being careless in handling it while plugged in.
That means I live in fear of snagging the power cord and damaging my computer. I could probably fix it, as I have done previously, but it occurred to me that there should be solutions to this problem, however, google did not come to the rescue.
When I use my laptop for music or photography, where I often risk stepping on something that will in turn pull on the power cord, I actually double clamp the cord to the table so that if I pull on it somehow, it will avoid yanking the plug out of the computer the wrong way. I also make sure to have a clamp positioned so that should a large force be applied to the cord, it will be redirected perpendicular to the plug itself so it won't bend the plug and just yank it away. Which is the best case scenario.
However, that's a royal pain in the ass that really should not be very difficult to fix.

For starters, many laptops have a relatively long plug that seems designed to apply the most leverage possible to screw up either the plug itself, the female plug inside the chassis or both. Often both. Why not design something more foolproof?

For instance, a L shaped adapter, maybe with a magnetic ring, would safeguard a laptop from such an incident. No such things seem to exist. There are Lightning and USB plug with magnets, but not power chords.

Another solution would be some sort of capture device glued to the laptop itself where one can place the chord. Not ideal, but it would leave some play that may be just enough to stop before damage is done.

This is one of those "we could put a man on the moon" things. There has to be a better solution. For my purposes, and given my habits, a L saped cord would be great, except that for my laptop the cord and the brick are one and the same. I actually have 4 of them so I don't have to carry the whole thing around the house: I have one on my desk, one near my chair, one near my piano, and so on.

Still, when I play music or photograph something (I connect the camera and use the PC as a remote) wires are everywhere and often I have to walk around an obstacle course of tripods, power bricks, flash, etc.

I could really use some peace of mind knowing that I secured the cord in such a way tat I cannot brick my computer by simply tripping on a cord.

As a DIY, I was thinking of buying a Male and Female plug for my adaptor and then build my own L shaped add-on. But I figured I'd ask here first because:
Lots of smart people read this forum
The product may already exist, but I am searching for it wrong.

Thank you for reading this. Should you be Elon Musk or a friend of his, let him know this is an untapped market, if sold with the appropriate marketing "SAVE YOUR LAPTOP FROM BROKEN PLUGS" or something.
 

conticreative

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That was a surprise, I guess I need to update my Google-fu.
I didn't find anything because I was being too generic with my search and probably I was using the wrong keywords.

I searched for things like "Laptop Power cord L plug" and I got pages of "replacement power adaptors. I never imagined anyone was making adaptors for my brand and model.

A similar thing happened to me back in the day when my wife broke the apple lightning connector inside her new iPad and I couldn't find a single instance of anyone having the same problem. That is, until I learned the name for the connector and then I found hundreds of people with broken connectors. But "iPad power plug" didn't return a thing. Useful, anyway.

I am going to make sure that my plug is indeed the same as the one they sell on amazon and buy a couple if it is.

Still, I am probably going to take one of my extra power supplies and see if I can create my own magnetic plug. Once I am dealing with just wires, I am sure I can find some third party magnetic plug I can insert in the cord so in case it's pulled it will separate before the original plug breaks or bends. I don't care very much for portability, I mostly use my laptop at home, but I have a music, work and a photo station where I want to be able to carry just the unit and not bring all the cables and mice, etc.

Thank you very much.
 

conticreative

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There actually are magnetic power cord adapters but sadly unlike with countertop deep fryers, the magnetic end is at the outlet.

The BreakSafe USB cables you have seen were developed because Apple discontinued their MagSafe system for USB-C

It actually makes sense to DIY a flexible stubby wire extension because then you could pull in any direction and the barrel will unplug.
Well, someone pointed me to this: https://www.amazon.com/90-degree-Connector-Converter-Latitude-Elitebook/dp/B009KUI41S which will partially solve the problem.
Then I am going to look for a plug similar to the ones used by deep fryers to splice in the cable itself. If I can find the plugs and it's a straightforward process, then I'll retrofit all my power cords with the same magnetic breakaway plug, so I can move from station to station with just the laptop and the shortened cord. That would be great.

It's a shame magnetic plugs have not taken hold as much as I hoped for. Probably in an effort to keep cots low they used crappy magnets or other fittings and they didn't work so well.
I am willing to sacrifice some of the compactness, meaning using larger and better quality magnets, to avoid incidents.
Beside the broken female power plugs, which are a real pain, I have sent my iPhone, iPad and even my laptop flying off the table because I got the cord snagged someplace. Easy to do after a full day of photography or while moving guitars around.

So far, it only happened over relatively thick carpet, but if I am successful, it won't happen again at all.

For the record, I had some great studio headphones that cost me a pretty penny, but they got yanked one too many times and one of the cups stopped working.

That's when I learned how the microscopic wires inside modern headphones work. They are really thin and have a coating on them, making repairs problematic. But not impossible. I discovered the best way to get rid of the coating is to burn it off.
I used some old earbuds cable and joined it with the expensive headphones cable and now they work great.

Thank you.
 

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