Question laptop base clock frequency

Aug 22, 2021
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I will buy a new laptop and I have a question related to laptop base clock frequency.

I am a light or occasional gamer and mostly use laptop for daily purpose which include watching videos, browsing internet like opening multiple tabs in multiple browsers like 10-20 tabs etc.., working on office apps like Word,Excel etc and maybe occasionally Engineering programming/CAD software/simulating software

Should I go for i7-10750H 6corex2.60 GHz -5.00 GHz or Ryzen7 5800H 8core x 3.2 GHz- 4.4 GHz?

My concern is maybe these laptops are targeted for professional gamer or creators as a base clock frequency of 8core x 3.2 GHz will generate lot of heat for a laptop which is occasionally used for gaming and maybe I should opt for a lesser base clock frequency of 6corex2.60 GHz which would be ideal for my usage or which laptop minimum base clock frequency and number of cores should I be looking for ?
 
Aug 22, 2021
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What I understand from tdp is something which tells the amount or impact a CPU processor has on ur laptop generating heat. Since its same in both the processors so it makes sense I should look for more cores/threads etc...

I would also like to know based on my usage as described in the post which processor would u suggest other than what I have mentioned?
 

Howardohyea

Proper
May 13, 2021
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You can always limit the laptop's capability using throttlestop.

As far as the two, I'd go for the ryzen because it has more cores, a faster single thread performance and still the same tdp as the Intel:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-i7-10750H-vs-AMD-Ryzen-7-5800H/3657vs3907
TDP is a meaningless number, people, especially laptop manufacturers all make different algorithms for power management, resulting in each laptop being different, and both Intel/AMD's specs become meaningless.

Also let me just throw in this, but I won't use sites like cpubenchmark for comparison of processors, they never list the test system specs like laptop model, RAM speed, and other information. For actual performance figures read reviews of both laptop, not those shady benchmarks.

As to the original question, which laptops are you looking at? And at what price?
 
Reactions: maven.sharma
Aug 22, 2021
3
0
10
0
TDP is a meaningless number, people, especially laptop manufacturers all make different algorithms for power management, resulting in each laptop being different, and both Intel/AMD's specs become meaningless.

Also let me just throw in this, but I won't use sites like cpubenchmark for comparison of processors, they never list the test system specs like laptop model, RAM speed, and other information. For actual performance figures read reviews of both laptop, not those shady benchmarks.

As to the original question, which laptops are you looking at? And at what price?
My usage: light or occasional gamer and mostly use laptop for daily purpose which include watching videos, browsing internet like opening multiple tabs in multiple browsers like 10-20 tabs etc.., working on office apps like Word,Excel etc and maybe occasionally Engineering programming/CAD software/simulating software

The laptops I am looking at are:

HP 15-ec2275ng gaming notebook,Ryzen7 5800H,15.6 "
Clock frequency 8core x 3.2 GHz,up to 4.4 GHz
16 GB RAM,1000 GB SSD,NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050 4 GB,€ 952.01

HP 15-dk1270ng Notebook, i7 10750H,15.6 "
Clock frequency 6core x 2.6 GHz,up to 5 GHz
16 GB RAM,512 GB SSD,NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 4 GB,€ 949

what price? around 950 Euros
 
TDP is a meaningless number, people, especially laptop manufacturers all make different algorithms for power management, resulting in each laptop being different, and both Intel/AMD's specs become meaningless.

Also let me just throw in this, but I won't use sites like cpubenchmark for comparison of processors, they never list the test system specs like laptop model, RAM speed, and other information. For actual performance figures read reviews of both laptop, not those shady benchmarks.
It's definitely not a meaningless number as it is the 'thermal design power' or the target design power. These are a VERY good reference when comparing cpus and coolers or else they wouldn't help guide decisions.

There is no such thing as 'actual' performance figures since they always depend on other hardware. cpubenchmark is a VERY good relative comparison site because it's a bunch of test data for each processor aggregated into a number that can be used to compare processor to processor very well when you look at the single thread performance. It's has been flawlessly accurate in this regard. All other benchmark sites out there that use a few data points are so skewed it's not even funny.

For a particular laptop, yes, read the reviews, but don't expect performance numbers there to be easy to compare to another laptop in another review as the test conditions will be different enough that it's apples and oranges. So back to cpubenchmark again, lol.
 

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