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Question Laptop bricked? While upgrading to Windows 10

rlqjaalk

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Feb 26, 2015
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My laptop (Samsung NT305V5A-S4PB) was turned off while updating to Windows 10 during battery power and need help fixing it.
The laptop was running Windows 7 Home Premium K OA and I decided to update to Windows 10 on the Microsoft Windows 10 installation tool. Which I had to delete my graphics driver in order to proceed the installation. And while doing it, it turned off because the battery was low. So I made a usb installation boot drive which it is stuck on a black background with Windows 10 logo and a spinning circle. Please help me to fix this 8 year old laptop. Thanks!
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
Did you check if that model has Windows 10 drivers for the hardware? If not, you can end up with something major not working like no sound, or video card running on basic slow drivers.

Seemed like you learned not to work on laptops without the power plug connected.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran
You may need to power the machine off a couple of times during it booting Win 10; on the 2nd or 3rd bootup, you should get a menu with recovery options. See if you can roll back from here. If not, try that USB stick you made to repair or roll back (can't recall if the USB drive lets you do the latter).
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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While Windows 10 may not be officially supported, that doesn't mean it won't install and run quite well.

I have an Asus laptop on which it won't install, and the Windows 10 installer detects a hardware conflict that prevents it from installing. On most machines where the installer itself "gives the hardware a pass" Windows 10 runs quite well whether there were "official" drivers created for it or not. Microsoft's library of generic drivers that work is huge.

I'd try doing a completely clean install, hoping that the license was already created and linked to that machine on Microsoft's servers. And do this with the power connected. Never try doing a major update on battery power on a laptop.
 
Reactions: gn842a

gn842a

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Oct 10, 2016
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I would add that given the aggro these situations lead to I am getting in the habit of cloning the OS drive before proceeding. That way if I screw up I can get back to where I was.

On the win 10 vs win 7 issue I think you take your chances. I was going nuts this morning with a gpu driver install that JUST WOULDN'T WORK until I realized that I was on my Win 8.1 system, not the Win 10 system I just built a few weeks ago. THERE WERE NO WIN 8.1 DRIVERS (Radeon web site) and I was just going for Win 10. Silly me. I installed Win 7 drivers and now it all works.

So, while Win 10 might install and work quite well, it also might not.

Greg N
 

gn842a

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Win 10 system requirements:
  • Processor: 1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster processor or SoC.
  • 1 gigabyte (GB) for 32-bit or 2 GB for 64-bit.
  • Hard disk space: 16 GB for 32-bit OS 20 GB for 64-bit OS.
  • Graphics card: DirectX 9 or later with WDDM 1.0 driver.
  • Display: 800x600.
All that said I, if I were to install Win 10 I would want a good deal more: >2 Ghz on processor, 6 to 8 GB RAM (and 64 bit), 250 gb drive for OS.
 

gn842a

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Win 10 kinda sux in my view. But it is true Win 7 is moving beyond the support update window so we're all going to end up there sooner or later. GN
 

britechguy

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Win 7 is moving beyond the support update window so we're all going to end up there [on Windows 10] sooner or later.
And that's the long and the short of it.

I have been on every version of Windows since Windows came on the scene. When an operating system goes out of support, it goes off of my computers (at least if they're being used as "daily drivers" with a connection to cyberspace).

If anyone plans on staying in the Windows ecosystem they'll be using Windows 10 (and making a transition just like they've probably done multiple times in the past). Nothing is so constant as change, and nowhere is change so constant and rapid than in the world of electronic technology, which includes computers.
 

gn842a

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And that's the long and the short of it.

I have been on every version of Windows since Windows came on the scene. When an operating system goes out of support, it goes off of my computers (at least if they're being used as "daily drivers" with a connection to cyberspace).

If anyone plans on staying in the Windows ecosystem they'll be using Windows 10 (and making a transition just like they've probably done multiple times in the past). Nothing is so constant as change, and nowhere is change so constant and rapid than in the world of electronic technology, which includes computers.
True. But I hate it. I would be happy using DOS and scribe to format text files in my emacs emulator if I could.

8.1 still gets my vote as the best all around system I've ever used. Doesn't crash right and left like Win 10. Really easy to navigate. And I found the whole "start window" thing hugely contrived. I set mine to open to desktop and it was a cinch to go in and out of start menu with win key. The file indexing feature worked much better. It didn't try to kick me on to MS on line accounts. I would still be using it on my main build if I hadn't had a catastrophic installation of a new psu that fried everything and put me into a new build.

We had a wonderful 100 years where typewriter keyboards really didn't change much at all. Such bliss. My typewriter needed new ribbons from time to time but it never ever crashed. People developed lifelong affections for their typewriters. The news came once a day on a newspaper. Ah.....

Oh well. The really GREAT thing about computers is that after a few years you get to do to them what you really wanted to do when they were NEW: heave them into the trash.

Greg N
 

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