[SOLVED] Laptop CPU temperature

Status
Not open for further replies.
Oct 17, 2020
3
0
10
0
My laptop is Lenovo IdeaPad Gaming 3 15IMH05 with Intel core i7 - 10750H and Nvidia GTX 1650 Ti, which I just purchased it 2 weeks ago.
I don't know if my laptop has heating problems or is it normal, it is my first time owning a gaming laptop. But, from such a powerful CPU and GPU, and with verified information about my CPU and GPU, I know that I should be able to run most of modern games, and run average games with no problems, but for example, while I am running Total war Warhammer 2, and NOT even go in a battle, just opening it and be idle in the campaign map for 15 minutes, the laptop heat goes up to around 70-80, which some sources say its normal, but then after 20 more minutes at this 70-80 c temp, everything lags, and by lag I mean, everything turns very very slow, and no its not screen tearing, I have my max FPS set to "120" as my screen is 120Hz, so the lag and sudden slowness is because of the heat.
So what can I do? Like, I don't think anything is wrong with the laptop inner build, or hardware, or cooling system, maybe am doing something wrong? or maybe this is normal and laptops are built to only withstand gaming for only a period of time then needs a rest? I mean I only ran the game for 1 hour, and everything started to go very slow cause of the heat. And my CPU and GPU settings were ALL set to "Balanced" modes, not High performance, but my GPU "Power management" were set to "Optimal Power".
Also one more question, which side of my laptop has the CPU and which side has the GPU? Because my laptop right side (side where there is the windows button, F1,F2,F3 buttons, and ESC button and etc) is the one getting super hot, is that where the CPU or the GPU is?
 

keith12

Illustrious
Hey there,

Yes, gaming laptops (with strong CPU/GPU's) do get hot. How hot depends on the cooling system in use. They are not all the same, and not all CPU/GPU's will be in the same position as yours. It could very well be that the CPU is on the side that is very hot. Typically the CPU will reach higher temps than the GPU.

There are a couple of things you can do. You can use Intel XTU or Throttlestop to 'undervolt' your CPU. This has a dual benefit. Firstly it decreases the temp of the CPU, because there is a lower voltage going to the CPU. The second benefit comes from the lower heat of the CPU from undervolting, which is the CPU can also boost to it's all core boost or single core boost more frequently, and for longer, which equates to more steady sustained performance.

There are many tutorials online which show how to do it. Here's one for an example, and it's for my CPU - I7 9750h :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=ze8dN1UyAGQ&ab_channel=Meanpooh


If you follow the guide you will see clear results.

To supplement the undervolt, you could get a laptop cooler. The decent ones can reduce your temps even further, anywhere from 5-10c lower task dependant. They are very useful.
 

keith12

Illustrious
Hey there,

Yes, gaming laptops (with strong CPU/GPU's) do get hot. How hot depends on the cooling system in use. They are not all the same, and not all CPU/GPU's will be in the same position as yours. It could very well be that the CPU is on the side that is very hot. Typically the CPU will reach higher temps than the GPU.

There are a couple of things you can do. You can use Intel XTU or Throttlestop to 'undervolt' your CPU. This has a dual benefit. Firstly it decreases the temp of the CPU, because there is a lower voltage going to the CPU. The second benefit comes from the lower heat of the CPU from undervolting, which is the CPU can also boost to it's all core boost or single core boost more frequently, and for longer, which equates to more steady sustained performance.

There are many tutorials online which show how to do it. Here's one for an example, and it's for my CPU - I7 9750h :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=ze8dN1UyAGQ&ab_channel=Meanpooh


If you follow the guide you will see clear results.

To supplement the undervolt, you could get a laptop cooler. The decent ones can reduce your temps even further, anywhere from 5-10c lower task dependant. They are very useful.
 
Oct 17, 2020
3
0
10
0
Hey there,

Yes, gaming laptops (with strong CPU/GPU's) do get hot. How hot depends on the cooling system in use. They are not all the same, and not all CPU/GPU's will be in the same position as yours. It could very well be that the CPU is on the side that is very hot. Typically the CPU will reach higher temps than the GPU.

There are a couple of things you can do. You can use Intel XTU or Throttlestop to 'undervolt' your CPU. This has a dual benefit. Firstly it decreases the temp of the CPU, because there is a lower voltage going to the CPU. The second benefit comes from the lower heat of the CPU from undervolting, which is the CPU can also boost to it's all core boost or single core boost more frequently, and for longer, which equates to more steady sustained performance.

There are many tutorials online which show how to do it. Here's one for an example, and it's for my CPU - I7 9750h :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=ze8dN1UyAGQ&ab_channel=Meanpooh


If you follow the guide you will see clear results.

To supplement the undervolt, you could get a laptop cooler. The decent ones can reduce your temps even further, anywhere from 5-10c lower task dependant. They are very useful.
So to clarify this, it is completely normal for the CPU/GPU to be heated, and it is even more normal for a CPU/GPU to be heated even more in laptops, as it is in a very small cramped place under the laptop. So gamers use undervolting to fix that.
I personally don't believe it has ANYTHING to do with dust at all since I literally just bought it and have been using it only for 14 days, but I must say, my house is surrounded by a big spacious place, so there are no houses around my house, so my house is a little bit dusty, but I made sure that I put my laptop in a safe place from dust while I am not using it and while I am asleep.
I got one more question about undervolting, I have watched view videos of it already, I don't understand the part of "Set it to a value, and check if your CPU crashes or no until you find the best value for you", so my CPU will... crash? Is there is a way to find my undervolt right settings right away without having to do tests? Also, my CPU is 10th generation, will undervoting still work with 10th generation?
 

keith12

Illustrious
Yes, undervolting will work the same on 10th Gen.

I got one more question about undervolting, I have watched view videos of it already, I don't understand the part of "Set it to a value, and check if your CPU crashes or no until you find the best value for you", so my CPU will... crash? Is there is a way to find my undervolt right settings right away without having to do tests?
So, yes, the system may crash when finding out how far it can undervolt. For the most part a few crashes while you work threw the numbers is okay. Nothing to worry about.

Because each chip is different, that's why they say things like the above 'the best values for you' etc.

To start with make it very simple.

Undervolt both your core and cache to -100mv, and maybe the Intel GPU by -42mv. Save settings, and test your new settings with TS Bench. TS bench is the built in benchmark to stress your CPU at load to see if the settings are stable.

Then increase the undervolt in -0.10mv to each of the core/cache and test again. If it passes then keep trying for further reductions in core/cache only. The Intel GPU should only have a small undervolt of-42, don't decrease that further.

Then play a game, and see if there's a noticeable change in temps. If your system crashes, then reduce the undervolt slightly. So foe example, if you've set -140mv and it crashes, bring it back to -130mv and see if it crashes. So you kind of have to play around to get the sweet spot for your CPU, if ya get me.
 
Oct 17, 2020
3
0
10
0
Yes, undervolting will work the same on 10th Gen.



So, yes, the system may crash when finding out how far it can undervolt. For the most part a few crashes while you work threw the numbers is okay. Nothing to worry about.

Because each chip is different, that's why they say things like the above 'the best values for you' etc.

To start with make it very simple.

Undervolt both your core and cache to -100mv, and maybe the Intel GPU by -42mv. Save settings, and test your new settings with TS Bench. TS bench is the built in benchmark to stress your CPU at load to see if the settings are stable.

Then increase the undervolt in -0.10mv to each of the core/cache and test again. If it passes then keep trying for further reductions in core/cache only. The Intel GPU should only have a small undervolt of-42, don't decrease that further.

Then play a game, and see if there's a noticeable change in temps. If your system crashes, then reduce the undervolt slightly. So foe example, if you've set -140mv and it crashes, bring it back to -130mv and see if it crashes. So you kind of have to play around to get the sweet spot for your CPU, if ya get me.
Yes, I get what you mean by "the sweet spot", thank you very much for all this information, and excuse me for my little knowledge on these stuff.
 

keith12

Illustrious
Yes, I get what you mean by "the sweet spot", thank you very much for all this information, and excuse me for my little knowledge on these stuff.
Hey,

Not at all, you are welcome! :) If you have any questions you can PM, and I can try help. If you are satisfied with the answer and help, then you can close this thread by choosing an answer as the solution.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY