Question Laptop Socket 1440 FCBGA, would they all have the same bga layout?

jasonmbrown

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Assuming one had the Knowledge to both Modify the bios (to update/change the cpu microcodes), and the skills/tools required to desolder and resolder a BGA chip (I did a handful of Xbox 360 Reballs on the GPU/CPU).

Just need to confirm that the package reported in CPU-Z refers to the bga layout. So any 1440 FCBGA Cpu chips should have the same layout correct? Im planning to swap out an Intel Core i5-9300H to an Intel Core i9-9980HK (found a bunch of them at a pretty good price for 8 cores).

My laptop averages between 60 and 80c (Under Heavy Load and Max Turbo of 4ghz) depending on external temperatures. To combat this I plan to switch to liquid metal cooling, and replace the fans. As the MAX TDP on both chips is the same I'm not really worried about power related issues.

TL;DR:
From a purely technical aspect, Can you swap a laptop cpu for another of the same socket type.
 

Lutfij

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Technical aspect? I'm concerned you won't be able to tame the heat coming off that i9. Yes the i9 is advertised as 45W but in reality it dumps more heat than stated, it's the same case with all the other processors from Intel. If you're able to tame the heat, write the BIOS without issue and you're able to solder without issue, then yes you should be good to go though those are too may variables(if's) for people to drop resources into.
 

jasonmbrown

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Its quite cheap compared to buying a new laptop (like 1300$ cheaper) and would double my speed. According to ThrottleStop my cpus actual Max power draw is 31watts under full load. Not sure what the Actual Power draw is on the Intel Core i9-9980HK. Anyone got a good idea of the Actual real world Power draw on it?
 
Even disregarding both quite significant BIOS compatibility and feasibility of successfully desoldering the CPU (if required), it might likely be pure folly to assume the existing thermal solution and/or VRM/power delivery implementation on the system board would still be adequate for a CPU with more cores and/or clock speed.... (many laptops are on the verge of throttling under rendering or even gaming loads anyway, much less with a hotter CPU installed)

Unless you know for a fact that the exact same mainboard/cooling solution within the laptop is used for faster CPUs...I'd abandon the idea.
 

jasonmbrown

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Worst comes to worst I just put the old cpu back on. This is more so a learning experience for me, if it works I get a faster computer if it fails, I will have learned a decent amount.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
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Lol true, that would be absolute worst case scenario. So long as the bga soldering goes fine though, I don't think that will be an issue
When your worst case assumption also involves the assumption that everything goes fine, it's not exactly a worst case assumption.

I think the most likely result of all of this is you're buying a new laptop, but good luck to you.
 

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