[SOLVED] Leaving devices ON straight will cause them to have a shorter lifespan?

Azevedo

Reputable
Dec 4, 2014
59
0
4,630
0
Hey there

Nowadays devices in general (games consoles, tv/sat decoders, tv boxes, home theaters, etc...) they all have some kind of boot process (POST)

I was wondering if leaving those devices always ON will cause them to have a shorter lifespan. (screens are another matter)

Will the electric/electronic components "wear off" if the device is left ON straight?

My humble opinion is that leaving it ON straight will in fact prolong the lifespan because everytime a device is turned on all the system will go through POST which may stress even more the hardware (or maybe not?). Flash memories will say.

So, have your say: Will the electric/electronic components "wear off" if the device is left ON straight?
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
In theory, the continual, thermal fluctuation of powering a unit on and off will create wear and tear on a component more than just leaving it on, 24/7. The downside to leaving it on, of course, is power consumption and your electric bill. However, it's pretty much a moot point as components are designed to handle this stress until long after it becomes obsolete. Post people will purchase newer devices long before a component wears out. simply because their old components are outdated/obsolete/lack support, etc...

-Wolf sends
 

Azevedo

Reputable
Dec 4, 2014
59
0
4,630
0
Good point. The power consumption is so low for those devices, like 12v. Maybe it pays off if you consider the boot up time and POST
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Big rig truck drivers aren't rocket scientists, but even they understand the concept that the starting process puts more stress and more wear and tear on that engine than simply letting it run at idle for hours.

POST puts a lot of stress on a system. It's getting 'super flush' as bios puts full power to every component and piece of hardware in order to determine identity and status. And this happens almost simultaneously and remains as long as bios is active. It's not until OS loads and starts up that power plans and objectives kick in and running processes and services shut down if not needed.

Periodic reboots are healthy for Windows in particular, it resets cache and other memory functions, but other than that the only thing that happens with power downs is savings on electricity.
 

Azevedo

Reputable
Dec 4, 2014
59
0
4,630
0
Instead of power off, use sleep to ram.
That puts all parts into a very low power mode.
It also is faster to the sleep/wake process.

Use power down only when needed for a windows update.
If you read my 1st post you will see that I'm referring to devices in general (games consoles, tv/sat decoders, tv boxes, home theaters, etc...) I know PCs can go sleep mode but not all devices have that option.
 

Imacflier

Honorable
Jan 19, 2014
329
0
10,810
23
I was involved in the design, qualification, and manufacture of both integrated circuits and hybrid micro circuits used in critical defense applications. Without doubt, best longevity is attained by leaving them powered up 24/7. The most stressful part of the lifecycle is powering up and down due to the thermal shock experienced. This is also why electronic devices suffer from "infant mortality".

Larry
 

Azevedo

Reputable
Dec 4, 2014
59
0
4,630
0
I was involved in the design, qualification, and manufacture of both integrated circuits and hybrid micro circuits used in critical defense applications. Without doubt, best longevity is attained by leaving them powered up 24/7. The most stressful part of the lifecycle is powering up and down due to the thermal shock experienced. This is also why electronic devices suffer from "infant mortality".

Larry
Very nice explanation.

That explains why all my devices, as a remember, die in winter. I guess in winter the stress shock is even higher because of the temperature delta.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS